Tag Archives: ovarian pain during orgasm

Ovarian Pain During Orgasm

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    After I orgasm through masturbation or sex I start to get painful cramps in my uterus. Is This normal?
    Everything before the orgasms are normal, no pain. I can only describe the cramps as feeling like menstrual cramps only a little worse. Please help.

    • ANSWER:
      If you’re experiencing pain during or after sex there may be several factors that are contributing to the pain you feel. For women there are a number of physical conditions that may make sex hurt, including:

      * Pelvic Inflammatory Disease
      * Endometriosis
      * Ovarian cysts
      * Interstitial cystitis
      * Vaginismus
      * Vulvodynia
      * Some sexually transmitted diseases
      * Urinary infections
      * Yeast infections
      * Vaginal dryness
      * Physical injury and chronic pain

      I would recommend that if you experience pain during or after sex that you consult with your doctor/gynaecologist for further evaluation and to rule out any serious causes.

      Good luck :)

  2. QUESTION:
    Is it okay to take birth control if I am not sexually active?
    I am 19 years old and first want to take birth control pills for my acne, but I also want to take it because I never know what happens, I might end up having sex with someone I might not. But lets say my acne is cleared and I continue to stay on the pill for years without being active, will be be fine?
    also do they make you gain weight?

    • ANSWER:
      Health Benefits & Advantages

      Birth control pills provide certain health benefits in addition to preventing pregnancy.

      •Menstrual cycle regulation. Birth control pills cause menstrual cycles to occur regularly and predictably. This is especially helpful for women with periods that come too often or too infrequently. Periods also tend to be lighter and shorter.

      •Decrease risk of iron deficiency (anemia). Birth control pills reduce the amount of blood flow during the period. Less blood loss is helpful in preventing anemia.

      •Reduce the risk of ovarian cysts. The risk of developing ovarian cysts is greatly reduced for birth control pills users because they help prevent ovulation. An ovarian cyst is a fluid – filled growth that can develop in the ovary during ovulation.

      •Protection against pelvic inflammatory disease. Birth control pills provide some protection against pelvic inflammatory disease (PID). Pelvic inflammatory disease is a serious bacterial infection of the fallopian tubes and uterus that can result in severe pain and potentially, infertility.

      •Can improve acne. For moderate to severe acne, which over-the-counter and prescription medications can’t cure, birth control pills may be prescribed. The hormones in the birth control pill can help stop acne from forming.

      •Improve fibrocystic breasts. 70 – 90% of patients see improvement in the symptoms of fibrocystic breast conditions with use of oral contraceptives.

      •Help prevent osteoporosis. Studies show that by regulating hormones, the pill can help prevent osteoporosis, a gradual weakening of the bones.

      •Do not affect future fertility. Using pills will not affect a womanТs future fertility, although it may take two to three months longer to get pregnant than if a woman did not take pills.

      Risks & Disadvantages

      About 40% of women who take birth-control pills will have side effects of one kind or another during the first three months of use. The vast majority of women have only minor, transient side effects Some side effects are uncommon but may be dangerous.

      •Heart attack. The chances of birth control pills contributing to a heart attack are small unless you smoke. Studies have shown that smoking dramatically increases the risk of heart attack in women age 35 years or older, which is why pills are generally not prescribed to women in this age group who smoke.

      •Blood pressure. Women taking birth control pills usually have a small increase in both systolic and diastolic blood pressure, although readings usually remain within the normal range.

      •Migraines and stroke. Women who take oral contraceptive and have a history of migraines have an increased risk of stroke compared to nonusers with a history of migraine.

      •Blood clots (Venous thromboembolism). Women who use birth control pills are at a slightly increased risk of having a blood clot in the legs or lungs. Studies consistently show that the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) is two to six times higher in oral contraceptive users than in nonusers.

      •Headaches. Headaches may start in women who have not previously had headaches, or can get worse in those who do.

      •Depression. Depression (sometimes severe) and other mood changes may occur.

      •Nausea and vomiting. This side effect usually goes away after the first few months of use or can be prevented by taking the pill with a meal.

      •Breast tenderness. Your breasts may become tender or may get larger. Breast tenderness is relatively common during the first month of BCPs and uncommon thereafter.

      •Breakthrough bleeding or spotting. Spotting or bleeding between menstrual periods is very common in the first cycle of pills or if pills are missed or taken late.

      •Decreased enjoyment of sex. Some women experience a decreased interest in sex or a decreased ability to have orgasms.

      •Weight gain. Some women report slight weight gain. Weight gain is often caused by fluid retention or estrogen-induced fat deposits in the thighs, hips, and breasts.

      Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/372251

  3. QUESTION:
    why ther is pain in vagina and clitoris while urinating?
    i have severe pain in the. vaginal and clitoris area during urinating.during since i am not able to reach my climax my boy friend insert his finger inside the vagina.will ther be any cut due to sex . whether the pain is due to that?

    • ANSWER:
      Hi,

      When a woman feels pain while having sexual intercourse, it is called dyspareunia. Painful sex is fairly common. Nearly two out of three women have it at some time during their lives. The pain can range from very mild to severe.

      Painful sex can have both physical and emotional causes. To understand why the pain occurs, you should know what happens to your body during sex.

      A woman’s body follows a regular pattern when she has sex. There are four stages:

      Desire — The feeling that you want to have sex.
      Arousal — Physical changes take place. Your vagina and vulva get moist and the muscles of the opening of the vagina relax. The clitoris swells and enlarges. The uterus lifts up, and the vagina gets deeper and wider.
      Orgasm — The peak of the response. The muscles of the vagina and uterus contract and create a strong feeling of pleasure. The clitoris can feel orgasm, too.
      Resolution — The vagina, clitoris and uterus return to their normal state.

      Types of Pain and solutions for that

      During sex a woman may feel pain in the vulva, at the opening of the vagina, within the vagina, or deep inside. Vulvar pain is pain felt on the surface (outside) of the vagina. Vaginal pain is felt within the vagina. Deep pain can occur in the lower back, pelvic region, uterus and bladder.
      Vulvar Pain
      Pain can occur when some part of the vulva is touched. The vulva may be tender or irritated from using soaps or over-the-counter vaginal sprays or douches. Other causes include scars, cysts or infections.

      Vaginal Pain
      Vaginal dryness. The most common cause of pain inside the vagina is lack of moisture. This can occur with certain medications, with certain medical conditions, or because you are not aroused. It can occur at certain times of your life such as during or just after pregnancy, while breastfeeding, or near or after menopause.

      Vaginitis. Another cause of vaginal pain is vaginitis — an inflammation of the vagina. The most common symptoms of vaginitis are discharge, itching and burning of the vagina and vulva. Vaginitis has many possible causes, such as yeast or bacterial infection.

      Vaginismus. Vaginismus is a spasm of the muscles at the opening of the vagina. It causes pain when your partner tries to enter the vagina. In some cases, vaginismus is present the first time a woman has — or tries to have — sex. The pain also may occur during a pelvic exam.

      Vaginismus also can be a response to a fear of some kind, such as being afraid of getting pregnant.

      Deep Pain
      Pain that starts deep inside may be a warning sign of an internal problem. Pain that happens when the penis touches the cervix can have many causes:

      Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID)
      Problems with the uterus
      Endometriosis
      A pelvic mass
      Bowel or bladder disease
      Scar tissue (adhesions)
      Ovarian cysts

      Emotions Play a Role
      Pain during sex sometimes can be linked to a state of mind. Emotional factors, like memories or fears, can keep you from relaxing. Some women may feel guilty having sex. Or, some women may be afraid of getting pregnant or getting a sexually transmitted disease (STD). Sometimes, a past bad sexual experience, such as rape or sexual abuse, may be the cause. All these factors may make it hard to relax during sex. This prevents arousal and lubrication.
      Finally …
      Pain during sex is a sign there may be a problem. Talk to your doctor about the pain so that the cause can be found and treated as soon as possible. Proper treatment can help you enjoy your sex life.

  4. QUESTION:
    Do many women have abdominal pain after intercourse?
    Hi! Have you ladies experienced lower abdominal pain after having sex? If so, how long has it lasted? (p.s. any tips on reaching orgasm?)
    How do I tell a doctor that I’ve been having pain?

    • ANSWER:
      If you’re experiencing pain during or after sex there may be several factors that are contributing to the pain you feel. For women there are a number of physical conditions that may make sex hurt, including:

      * Pelvic Inflammatory Disease
      * Endometriosis
      * Ovarian cysts
      * Interstitial cystitis
      * Vaginismus
      * Vulvodynia
      * Some sexually transmitted diseases
      * Urinary infections
      * Yeast infections
      * Vaginal dryness
      * Physical injury and chronic pain

      I would recommend that if you experience pain during or after sex that you consult with your doctor/gynaecologist for further evaluation and to rule out any serious causes.

      Good luck :)

  5. QUESTION:
    What can cause pain during orgasm?
    I’m a 24 year old woman and apart from being a heavy woman I am relatively healthy. However for the last couple of weeks I have been jumping from spotting to light bleeding after about3 months of not bleeding.The lack of bleeding I know is mostly due to my birth control. Tonight my boyfriend and I were intimate and it was uncomfortable and slightly painful for me when I finally reached orgasm I had a sharp pain shoot through my lower right abdomen felt much like a muscle spam in the leg but worse and my stomach is still hurting me now almost an hour later.What is going on?

    • ANSWER:
      the most common reasons would be muscle spasms, endometriosis, ovarian cysts or fibroids. I would have it checked out if it continues.


ovarian pain during orgasm