Dermoid Ovarian Cyst In Pregnancy

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    What is the main ovarian cyst symptoms?
    Is it true that ovarian cyst symptoms are the same as pregnancy symptoms.
    I’ve read some answers here saying that but I don’t think that’s true.

    • ANSWER:
      The number of women suffering from ovarian cyst has caused concern for other women everywhere. The alarming growth of incidents may indicate that no one is immune to this dreaded reproductive problem. In recent years, millions of women from all walks of life have experienced having ovarian cyst, and chances are you too might have one as well. So it is vital that you learn the ovarian cyst symptoms to detect the disease as quickly as possible.

      First you have to remember that ovarian cyst symptoms are different depending on its type. An ovarian cyst could either be one of the following: functional cyst, polycystic ovaries, endometrial cysts, cytadenomas and dermoid cysts. The symptoms of each of these types are different because their growth is not the same.

      It is hard to tell the cysts on ovaries symptoms in its early development, which is definitely a bad news to all the women. They might just mistake the symptoms as part of their menstrual period. But if the pain gets really excruciating, then it is definitely not the ordinary menstrual cramp, it could be ovarian cyst already.

      Recurring back aches could also be signs of having ovarian cyst. If your back is constantly aching, you should see your doctor quick for an examination. Lower back pain could also be a signal that you have cyst on ovary.

      If you notice tenderness in your breasts, it may also be one of the ovarian cyst symptoms. See your doctor at once if you notice clearly the obvious change in your breasts. Irregular menstrual period is also one of the symptoms of having this type of reproductive disease.

      If you feel like you always want to vomit, then you might be suffering from this disease as well. Women who are still in their reproductive years may simply mistake it as being a sign of pregnancy. But they might already be suffering from ovarian cyst if the feeling of vomiting is frequent.

      Pain during sex may also indicate that you have ovarian cyst. In case it would be your first time to experience pain during your intimate moments with hubby, then it should be a cause for concern. The growing cyst in your ovary is causing the pain.

      Problem in bowel movement is another symptom of having ovarian cyst. Women should not ignore if they have frequent constipation as it may be one of the ovarian cyst symptoms. You might also be developing cyst on ovary if you feel a constant abdominal pain accompanied by pressure.

      Visit your doctor at once for ovarian cyst treatment if you are suffering from any of the symptoms mentioned above. Although most of the symptoms are also connected with other reproductive problems, it is better to be safe than sorry.

  2. QUESTION:
    What is the Treatment for Ovarian cyst?
    my grandma having 6cm ovarian cyst what is the treatment? she is 70 years old. doctors told that she is weak surgery is impossible.

    • ANSWER:
      Hi,
      The treatment depends upon the size and type of the cyst, the women’s age and overall health, her future pregnancy plans and the symptoms that she is experiencing. The treatment options include:
      Expectant – Where the cysts are small (< 8 cm) and appear functional, they can be observed for 2-3 months as many of them resolve.

      Surgery – can be decided upon if the cyst does not disappear on its own or is causing severe pain or bleeding or if the cyst is of a type which requires surgery (Dermoid, Endometrial, Cystadenoma). Surgery can be through laparoscope or conventional (by an incision on the tummy), depending on the size & type of cyst patient profile and expertise of surgeon.

      Treatment of Polycystic ovaries – This depends upon the requirement of the patient, her symptoms and profile. Weight reduction in an overweight patient constitutes the most important treatment. The other treatments can be hormonal for regularising the periods and for excessive facial hair as well as ovulation induction (aiding in producing an egg) in case of infertility.

  3. QUESTION:
    Can an ovarian cyst cause me not to get pregnant?
    I am 22 years old, My boyfriend and I want to get married and have a baby. I recently found out I have a large cyst on one of my ovaries. I have always had an irregular period, but it’s always come. Could the cyst be why I haven’t gotten pregnant yet??

    • ANSWER:
      Not if your other ovary is alright. Like numerous parts of the human anatomy … such as the brain, if one side fails … the other part/one takes on the work for the both of them. Therefore, it’s not necessarily true … that you would only ovulate every other month. You can, and may, ovulate each and every month.

      I tried to conceive for 10 years. I had a tipped uterus, as well as my uterus being “spongy” and twice it’s normal size. I had pelvic adhesions, which had twisted my fallopian tubes around … and bound them to my bowel. I also had cysts on both of my ovaries … the one on my right ovary turned out to be a dermoid cyst … which had burst and hemorrhaged, so my OB/GYN had to remove it.

      Now … going by all of this, you wouldn’t think it was possible for a pregnancy to occur right? Wrong … my period was late one month, so I did a HPT … I couldn’t believe my eyes!! I gave birth to a very healthy 8lb 5 oz baby boy. Now, wait a minute … not done yet … lol. After his birth the doc gave me birth control pills, and after reading the possible side effects … I chickened-out and didn’t take them. Well … ONE month later … PREGNANT again!! I gave birth to a beautiful 7lb 11oz baby boy. My sons are not quite a year apart … in fact, they’re the same age for 9 days.

      So, as you can see … you’re soooo still able to get pregnant. Don’t fret … just go with the flow, and when the time is right … you will be a mommy.

      I know how you feel hun, and I wish you all the best ……

      BTW: Welcome to Y!A !!

  4. QUESTION:
    what is an ovarian cyst, how is it seen, can you feel it, and what re the symptons?
    I have a small ovarian cyst on my right ovary. When i went to the doctors they didn’t give me much info.

    • ANSWER:
      Ovarian cysts are fluid-filled sacs that develop on the ovaries, the female reproductive organs that produce eggs. Women can develop ovarian cysts as a normal part of their menstrual cycle as the ovaries prepare eggs to release into the fallopian tubes. While many of these cysts are completely benign (not harmful to health), some ovarian cysts can be malignant, meaning they pose a danger to health

      Types of Ovarian Cysts
      Ovarian cysts can develop for a number of reasons and range from being completely harmless to life threatening. Here is an outline of the various types of ovarian cysts:
      cystadenomas: cysts that develop on the outside of the ovary, causing pain if they are particularly large

      dermoid cysts: cysts that can also grow hair, teeth and a variety of other tissues, causing pain if they are particularly large

      functional cysts: cysts filled with eggs that develop during menstruation and disappear once the eggs are released

      endometriomas: cysts that grow in or outside of the uterus, causing pain if they are particularly large

      polycystic ovaries: cysts filled with eggs that aren’t released and, instead, continue to grow.

      Symptoms of Ovarian Cysts
      The type of ovarian cyst you have will determine the symptoms you experience. However, some cases of ovarian cysts are asymptomatic, meaning the cysts exist without causing any noticeable symptoms. In general, the following are common symptoms associated with the presence of ovarian cysts:
      achiness in the in the back (especially the lower back) and upper legs
      breast tenderness
      irregular menstrual cycles
      nausea and/or vomiting
      painful sex
      pressure and/or pain in the abdomen
      pressure and/or pain on the bladder and/or rectum
      problems passing urine
      weight gain.
      Keep in mind that the above symptoms of ovarian cysts are fairly generic and may also be associated with the presence of other conditions, such as endometriosis, ectopic pregnancy or pelvic inflammatory disease. As a result, seeing a doctor is important for an official diagnosis of ovarian cysts.

      In more serious cases when the ovarian cysts are particularly harmful to your health, symptoms include:
      dizziness or light-headedness
      fatigue
      fever
      severe abdominal pain
      shortness of breath and/or rapid breathing
      vomiting.
      If you start experiencing any of the above symptoms, seek immediate medical attention.

  5. QUESTION:
    Can you wanna be pregnant so badly you have the syptoms?
    I just recently had my last Depo shot in April of 2006. Me and my husband want a baby so badly.
    It started a couple weeks ago, but my stomach feels like it has a knot in it when I lay belly down, and I have been going to bed around 10-11pm and I just can’t get myself outta bed till around noon or so. I usually get up around 8-9am. I took a home pregnancy test last week and it was negative.
    I have heard that if you want to be pregnant really badly, that your body makes the changes as if you were.
    Is this true or is it just a tale?
    It doesn’t hurt when I lay on my belly, I just feel sick when I lay on my belly, and believe me, I’m the kinda person that sleeps best on my belly. :-)

    • ANSWER:
      This sounds like the situation that I was in about a year ago. I had one shot (April ’05)… when my next shot was due… I didn’t go to get it after all the bad stories that I have heard about it. I felt a little bit of pressure around my lower abdomen on both sides when I slept on my belly… I went to the doctor (I was also pregnant… I’m guessing a faulty dose or something… anywayz…) it turned out that I had an ovarian cyst. When I lost the babies about 4 months into the pregnancy… they did a scan. The cysts did not look like normal cysts (women develop cysts around the time they have their period… in most cases go away on their own… or if they do stay there… some are harmless not all… anywayz…). They then sent me to get an MRI done… and it turned out that I had dermoid cysts… and at that point in time… they went from feeling like small pressure on my sides when I lay down… to terrible pain… felt like I was paralized at certain points. So… I got them removed back in Feb. 06 before they got any worse. To this day… I still think that it was the depo shot that gave me the cysts… and the doctor said that it may or may have not been the shot. I would honestly get it checked out… before you waive it off and it might actually be something. Call your doctor and let him/her know. Schedule and appt. Anywayz… if you want so bad to be pregnant… then yes you can get the symtpoms. I know of a girl who said that she was pregnant… she got the morning sickness… the tiredness… the belly… the whole 9 yards. 9 months came… she was still pregnant… 10 months… still pregnant… 11 months… she said that she lost the baby. But get this… she was still a VIRGIN!!! Her parents abused her and neglected her… and she wanted someone to love her so bad… so in her mind… she thought that she was pregnant… though she wasn’t. I hope all of this helps. Good luck!!


dermoid ovarian cyst in pregnancy

Home Treatment For Ruptured Ovarian Cyst

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    13 with 2 large ovarian cysts, extremely painful?
    I’m a 13 year old girl, and I discovered last month I had a six-inch cyst on my left ovary. Four days ago, I started having pain so extreme, I was in convulsions, vomited multiple times, and had to be rushed to the emergency room. They took a CT and an ultrasound, and determined I have 2 cysts, one on each ovary, of the same size. I have been at home, taking powerful pain meds, and I recently stopped yesterday. I had some pain, but it wasnt extreme. Today, I was fine till about four, and then I started having pain, and I vomited again. I could use some treatment options where I don’t have to inject myself with morphine every 8 hours, and go to school, or stay home, and act positively high. Also, I need some more info on what to expect from these. The doctor isn’t considering surgery, and if I do, they said that both ovaries would have to be removed, and I do not want that!
    I have had my period since I was 11, and it’s fairly regular, if it helps.

    • ANSWER:
      Besides losing your ovaries in surgery, I do not know the risks that you face by keeping the cysts. I do know that a friend of mine had a cyst rupture on her ovary causing her major pain and massive blood loss. She was in the hospital for a week in Serious Condition.
      Before you make any surgical decisions, you need to see 2 more doctors if possible. Losing your ovaries at such a young age is very serious. You need to get a second and third opinion before you move forward. Chances are, losing your ovaries is NOT your ONLY choice.
      You need to educate yourself. Do “Yahoo” or “Google” searches on “Ovarian Cysts” and arm yourself with as much information as possible. Start to create a list of questions for your doctor(s).
      Be prepared to stand up for yourself and your body too. Doctors will make a lot of assumptions without being completely thorough. They may assume that you are exempt from certain conditions based on your age, so they won’t test for them. Fight really hard to get the tests. Also, they may not appreciate such a young person asking so many medical questions. Don’t be intimidated. If you are scared, find an adult that you trust that will stand up for you at your appointments. Even though they are doctors, no one is a better expert about your body than you, and no one will fight as hard for your health as you. Once a doctor treats you, they are done, but you have to live with your body for the rest of your life.

      Here is some info from http://www.4women.gov/ (I found this by doing a Yahoo Search – it took less than 2 minutes):

      How are cysts treated?
      Watchful waiting. The patient waits and gets re-examined in one to three months to see if the cyst has changed in size. This is a common treatment option for women who are in their childbearing years, have no symptoms, and have a fluid-filled cyst. It also might be an option for postmenopausal women.

      Surgery. If the cyst doesn’t go away after several menstrual periods, has gotten larger, looks unusual on the ultrasound, causes pain, or you’re postmenopausal, the doctor may want to remove it. There are two main surgical procedures:

      Laparoscopy –
      If the cyst is small and looks benign on the ultrasound, your doctor may perform a laparoscopy. This procedure is done under general anesthesia. A very small incision is made above or below the navel, and a small instrument that acts like a telescope is inserted into the abdomen. If the cyst is small and looks benign, it can be removed.

      Laparotomy —
      If the cyst is large and looks suspicious, the doctor may perform a procedure called a laparotomy. This procedure involves making bigger incisions in the stomach to remove the cyst. While you are under general anesthesia, the doctor is able to have the cyst tested to find out if the tissue is cancerous. If it is cancerous, the doctor may need to remove the ovary and other tissues that may be affected, like the uterus or lymph nodes.

      Birth control pills -
      If you frequently develop cysts, your doctor may prescribe birth control pills to prevent you from ovulating. This will lower the chances of forming new cysts.

  2. QUESTION:
    help! ovarian cysts-what do these symptoms suggest?
    for the past year and a half i have suffered with 3 ruptured ovarian cysts. one was removed in appendix surgery, after thinking it was appendicitis but it was an ovarian cyst instead. both ultrasounds I’ve had last year showed nothing but i still had 2 cysts rupture anyway.

    had a third ultrasound 3 weeks ago, which showed possibility of PCOS, but as I’m on the pill for control of heavy bleeding and severe periods (I’m on it for 4 months straight with no breaks until 4 months is over, I’m 2 months in now) they said its hard to tell because the cysts, if there were some, would be shrinking and going away. they said i will not have any sort of bleeding etc because I’m on the pill and so all my symptoms of bleeding and pain will go. .

    however, yesterday i had severe pay and passed 2 sac like things from my vagina. I’m 14 and a virgin. i went to a&E and they said it seemed like a miscarriage but as I’m a virgin and they did a pregnancy test for precaution (Negitive, of course) then it was likely to be whole bits of uterus lining shedding because of the huge build up from no breaks on the pill. they couldn’t explain why it happened, especially as I’ve been on the pill religiously so i shouldn’t bleed at all. they told me to come off of the pill. when this lining stuff came out, there was a huge amount of blood, followed by this skin thing. then no bleeding or nothing. an hour later the exact same things happened again. now I’m bleeding continuously. they just told me to go home and stop the pill. I’m fed up of being left like this, for over a year. the gynae nurse i saw last night said going on the pill continuously with no break after 1 strip is dangerous and should have never been done, but it was the head of the gynae department who made me do it-at the same hospital. i now feel very faint and lightheaded, tired, sweaty. i also had a high pulse and high blood pressure.

    can you give any advice? thanks. xx

    • ANSWER:
      Okay chloe, just answered your first question and come across this later question. First I will give you my observations and then some advice. Bear in mind that you have not described your full medical history and test results, so I am much more in the dark than your doctors.

      Firstly, the types of cysts that you are getting are not like PCOS-type cysts. These are small, do not rupture, and generally do not cause pain. What you are suffering from is regular ovarian cysts (very different). I am not ruling out PCOS, it is possible to have PCOS-type cysts and ovarian cysts, but it seems less likely (but still, possible).

      Secondly, I am not sure why you have been put on BC pills with no break. It is not a standard treatment of PCOS, and it does have increased risks (of endometrial cancer, because the lining of the womb is not shed.) Be clear that I am NOT saying you have endometiral cancer, that is different. Rather, I am saying that the lining of your womb has built up such that when you have a period, you are passing large amounts of endometrial tissue (which can look like clumps of liver).

      Thirdly, I find it incredible that they can think you have had a miscarriage when you are a virgin! Okay, some girls lie about it at your age, and they have to be make sure (and run the test). But they should do so discreetly, without mentioning miscarriages!!! I dont think that is at all professional.

      Okay, so how to help you? I cannot say I have any magical answers as to what is wrong with you. That is a tough call based on limited info. I would say though that I cannot see any reason to suspect PCOS based on what you have said in your 2 questions. That doesn’t mean you dont have PCOS, maybe you left out some important facts. Just that nothing you have said suggests PCOS.

      Next I would say, find another doctor. You will recover from this soon, you are young. But you need to get better treatment than taking BC pills continuously…….

  3. QUESTION:
    Is it possible I had a very early on miscarriage?
    After my period was a week late, I took a test Tuesday night. The test had a beyond a shadow of a doubt plus sign. Wednesday morning, I woke up to horrifying abdominal pain and a bed full of blood. Too much blood that if I were actually pregnant, nothing could have been done at that point anyways. Being as I am, I didn’t go to the ER, and figured since nothing can be done, I should just wait it out at home. I waited until Friday when the pain was just too unbearable to take anymore. I went to my regular doctor, who then sent me to the ER immediately. They ran every test possible (blood, urine, internal exam, external and internal ultrasound, cat scan), and could find absolutely nothing wrong. They said I was definitely not pregnant, and found no evidence of a ruptured ovarian cyst (which I have had before which caused similar pain). After spending 12 hours in the ER, still in immense pain (I Refused painkillers, because I don’t really believe in them) and no more tests the doctor could run, I just signed the refusal of treatment paperwork and left.

    The hospital couldn’t find any evidence of what went wrong. Today, the bleeding has subsided, and the pain has lessened. I have never experienced anything like that in my whole life. I have read that once a woman miscarried, especially very early in pregnancy, that within a few days, all evidence of the pregnancy is gone (the hormones, the tissues ect…). Is it possible I miscarried very early and by the time I went to the hospital, all the signs I was ever pregnant were gone already? I’m just trying to wrap my head around what happened. My husband is very concerned that the doctors couldn’t find anything, and something like that may happen again. Any ideas?
    P.S. I did tell the doctors about the positive pregnancy test/late period, but they simply couldn’t find any signs of me ever being pregnant.
    I have Crohns disease, which for now is in remission. I have taken painkillers before, and they only seem to anger my digestive problems. In the wake of all the blood and pain, I figured it was better to take the pain, rather than aggravate the Crohns and have to deal with 24/7 pain and horrifying symptoms for the next few months. What I more correctly should have said is: I don’t take pain killers because they only cause me further, long term pain.

    • ANSWER:
      Yeah it was most likely a miscarriage and the good news is it completely expelled itself on its own. Sometimes pieces are left behind and you need surgery or risk infection. About 50% of conception ends in miscarriage but only 30% of conceptions are diagnosed pregnancies that end in miscarriage. 20% of conceptions end in miscarriage and the mother never knows she was pregnant. It just looks like a late extra heavy, extra crampy period. The intense pain usually subsides after the actual fetal tissue and placental tissue pass. I am sorry for your loss. If you are trying to have a baby wait at least one normal menstrual period before you try again. Odds are your next period will be perfectly healthy.

  4. QUESTION:
    Treatment for Ovarian Cyst?? Please help?
    Last week I went into the emergency room at my local hospital with terrible pains on my right side. After a few tests I was told I had an Ovarian Cyst that had ruptured. I was on a drip for 4 days and was then allowed home. I felt extremely bloated but my doctors told me that in a few days my body will be able to fix itself up and I will be fine. I wasn’t perscribed anything.
    I am a 20 year old female. I am sexually active and have always found it slightly painful and uncomfortable to have sex.
    My stomach is still very bloated 8 days after the rupture. Sorry for the graphic details, but I have also had a thick white discharge and my vagina has been smelling a bit :/
    I went back to my local GP yesterday because I still have a stomache ache, which feels like very bad period pain. It has been hurting like this for 8 days, but until this afternoon I had not gotten my period. This afternoon however I have started ‘spotting’. It’s not like a proper period, just like bits of tissue etc.
    I got a referral to have another ultrasound today and my doctor called me with the results. I have another cyst in the same ovary, 20x18mm in size.
    Again, like the doctors at the hospital, my GP told me that my body will fix itself. She said it was “likely” that this cyst would go away and not rupture. In the meantime I have to wait and relax.
    I am not really satisfied with this answer, I feel I keep getting vague responses from doctors. Is this cyst at risk of rupturing? It’s grown pretty big for 8 days right?
    Are there any treatments that I can go on that will help me? Natural remidies?
    I would really appreciate your help and ideas.

    • ANSWER:
      go to an OBGYN.

  5. QUESTION:
    Info about burst ovarian cysts?
    On Sunday mum was admitted to hospital because an ovarian cyst ruptured inside her. She’s been in the hospital since, was supposed to have an ultrasound today but it is going to be tomorrow.

    In all my life my mum has never been hospitalized. My dad was when he had cancer when I was very young and seeing mum in hospital with the smell of hospital made me feel so much worse about the situation. I would ask her about her situation but I’m the sort of person who will just cry about it, lol. I hate leaving her after I visit. Anyway could I have some info on these ovarian cysts? Are they dangerous? Is it bad that it burst? Will she need surgery? If so will the surgery be dangerous?

    • ANSWER:
      I’m sorry your Mum is in hospital – I know you’ll be worried and concerned about her. Keep visiting, and remember that she’ll be worried too, maybe trying not to let you know. So give her lots of hugs and smiles !

      A ruptured ovarian cyst can be quite a painful situation. The ovary has many little “bubbles” all over it, and in this situation , one of them becomes full of fluid and then it bursts. This is quite serious, and as you have seen, the woman has to go to hospital. At the moment, your Mum is being stabilized – the doctors are making sure she is OK for further treatment. She may be having some antibiotics to make sure she doesn’t get an infection there. And she’ll be getting some pain killers to keep her comfortable.

      If she is going to have surgery to repair the area, no it isn’t dangerous at all. The doc will decide what he is going to do, after she has had the ultrasound, since he will be able to see how big the ruptured cyst is, and how much damage there is. The operation will last a few hours, and the doc will tell you and the family how things went, as soon as they are finished.

      After the surgery she’ll be in hospital for about 5 days, and will have more antibiotics and pain relief. When she comes home she’ll have some pain, and won’t be able to do all the usual tasks at home. You can be a big help by doing some of the chores for her – she’ll be very grateful I’m sure.

      After a couple of weeks, she’ll be pretty much back to normal. Doc will put her on medications so this doesn’t happen again.

      Best wishes to you, and don’t worry, she is going to be fine.


home treatment for ruptured ovarian cyst

Are Ovarian Cysts Dangerous During Pregnancy

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Is an ovarian cyst during pregnancy dangerous?
    Hi, when I was told I was pregnant. The doctor discover and ovarian cyst on my left side. I’m 18 weeks pregnant with no complications. Does anyone know is it dangerous to have a cyst during pregnancy.. Or have gone through the same situation?? Thank you for answering.. :)

    • ANSWER:
      It is not dangerous to the baby whatsoever. They usually tend to go away on their own.
      If you feel sharp pain where the cyst is, keep it in check. It could be because its twisting or it has burst. If it gets too big (rarely), the docs will drain it laparoscopically and it does not touch the baby.

  2. QUESTION:
    I am 7 weeks pregnant I have ovarian cyst is it dangerous for my baby?
    I am 7 weeks pregnant I have ovarian cyst is it dangerous for my baby?
    ovarian #1 cyst is 1 D 3.11cm,2 D 3.54cm
    ovarian #2 cyst is 1 D 2.30cm,2 D 1.98cm
    is there any risk for my baby, I have pain in my stomach. Can I lift or do work at home or I should rest?

    • ANSWER:
      No it isn’t dangerous. All women produce an ovarian cyst called a Corpus Luteum Cyst each time they ovulate. If no pregnancy occurs, the cyst will disappear and the uterus will shed it’s lining, causing the bleeding you see during your period. If pregnancy does occur, the cyst will remain. It produces the hormones needed to maintain a pregnancy and it is what the baby lives off of until the placenta is formed. Usually they cause no symptoms and they just go away on their own after a few weeks so most women don’t even know that they had one. But occasionally, they can be quite large and cause some discomfort or pain. I had some pain and they wanted to rule out ectopic. I had a very large one at my 6 weeks ultrasound and it was completely gone by the u/s I had at 12 weeks. If your Dr isn’t concerned, then don’t worry about it.

  3. QUESTION:
    Is it okay to take birth control if I am not sexually active?
    I am 19 years old and first want to take birth control pills for my acne, but I also want to take it because I never know what happens, I might end up having sex with someone I might not. But lets say my acne is cleared and I continue to stay on the pill for years without being active, will be be fine?
    also do they make you gain weight?

    • ANSWER:
      Health Benefits & Advantages

      Birth control pills provide certain health benefits in addition to preventing pregnancy.

      •Menstrual cycle regulation. Birth control pills cause menstrual cycles to occur regularly and predictably. This is especially helpful for women with periods that come too often or too infrequently. Periods also tend to be lighter and shorter.

      •Decrease risk of iron deficiency (anemia). Birth control pills reduce the amount of blood flow during the period. Less blood loss is helpful in preventing anemia.

      •Reduce the risk of ovarian cysts. The risk of developing ovarian cysts is greatly reduced for birth control pills users because they help prevent ovulation. An ovarian cyst is a fluid – filled growth that can develop in the ovary during ovulation.

      •Protection against pelvic inflammatory disease. Birth control pills provide some protection against pelvic inflammatory disease (PID). Pelvic inflammatory disease is a serious bacterial infection of the fallopian tubes and uterus that can result in severe pain and potentially, infertility.

      •Can improve acne. For moderate to severe acne, which over-the-counter and prescription medications can’t cure, birth control pills may be prescribed. The hormones in the birth control pill can help stop acne from forming.

      •Improve fibrocystic breasts. 70 – 90% of patients see improvement in the symptoms of fibrocystic breast conditions with use of oral contraceptives.

      •Help prevent osteoporosis. Studies show that by regulating hormones, the pill can help prevent osteoporosis, a gradual weakening of the bones.

      •Do not affect future fertility. Using pills will not affect a womanТs future fertility, although it may take two to three months longer to get pregnant than if a woman did not take pills.

      Risks & Disadvantages

      About 40% of women who take birth-control pills will have side effects of one kind or another during the first three months of use. The vast majority of women have only minor, transient side effects Some side effects are uncommon but may be dangerous.

      •Heart attack. The chances of birth control pills contributing to a heart attack are small unless you smoke. Studies have shown that smoking dramatically increases the risk of heart attack in women age 35 years or older, which is why pills are generally not prescribed to women in this age group who smoke.

      •Blood pressure. Women taking birth control pills usually have a small increase in both systolic and diastolic blood pressure, although readings usually remain within the normal range.

      •Migraines and stroke. Women who take oral contraceptive and have a history of migraines have an increased risk of stroke compared to nonusers with a history of migraine.

      •Blood clots (Venous thromboembolism). Women who use birth control pills are at a slightly increased risk of having a blood clot in the legs or lungs. Studies consistently show that the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) is two to six times higher in oral contraceptive users than in nonusers.

      •Headaches. Headaches may start in women who have not previously had headaches, or can get worse in those who do.

      •Depression. Depression (sometimes severe) and other mood changes may occur.

      •Nausea and vomiting. This side effect usually goes away after the first few months of use or can be prevented by taking the pill with a meal.

      •Breast tenderness. Your breasts may become tender or may get larger. Breast tenderness is relatively common during the first month of BCPs and uncommon thereafter.

      •Breakthrough bleeding or spotting. Spotting or bleeding between menstrual periods is very common in the first cycle of pills or if pills are missed or taken late.

      •Decreased enjoyment of sex. Some women experience a decreased interest in sex or a decreased ability to have orgasms.

      •Weight gain. Some women report slight weight gain. Weight gain is often caused by fluid retention or estrogen-induced fat deposits in the thighs, hips, and breasts.

      Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/372251

  4. QUESTION:
    What are signs of an ovarian cyst?
    I have been having sharp pains in my lower right side. When I am still the pain is dull. But when I am active the pain is very sharp. I also think I might be pregnant. Not sure yet.
    Asking for my girlfriend.

    • ANSWER:
      Usually there are no signs of an ovarian cyst. Ovarian cysts are normal we get them during every cycle. It is when they don’t go away that they are abnormal this then becomes Poly-cystic Ovarian Syndrome. When this happens there are a lot of signs that occur during your adult life such as an increase in hair usually on the legs and face, weight gain, particularly around the stomach, infrequent menstrual cycle etc. This is not something that just happens for one or two cycles.
      If you think you are pregnant and you are having right sided pain that is quite severe then one thing that is a possibility is an ectopic pregnancy. This is where the baby has implanted in your fallopian tubes rather than in your uterus. This is a very serious condition and you would need to have the baby removed as the condition can be life threatening. So if the pain increases and you are pregnant you need to go to your doctor.
      Other possibilities are your uterus expanding- this is not usually one sided when pregnant or appendicitis. This is also dangerous and can be life threatening. I suggest you take a pregnancy test when you are ready and if the pain becomes really severe you should go and see a doctor. If the pains are more cramp like then it is probably your uterus expanding if you are pregnant but sharp one sided pains should not be ignored.

  5. QUESTION:
    Ive been haveing really bad pains on the left side of my stomach, what can this be?
    It’s been accuring every other day or so, and its painfull. What could it be and how do i prevent it?

    • ANSWER:
      Ovarian Cysts

      Doctor’s PCOS Healthy Diet eBook
      ——————————————————————————–

      An ovarian cyst is a fluid-filled sac usually found on the surface of an ovary. There are many types of ovarian cysts, each with a different underlying cause. Many women will have them at some point during their childbearing years. Most are completely without symptoms. However, some types can cause serious health problems.

      You have two walnut-sized ovaries. These are located on either side of the uterus, nestled under the fringed ends of the fallopian or uterine tubes. These tubes create a pathway for a released egg to reach the center of the uterus. During the menstrual cycle, one ovary will develop and mature an egg. The egg is encased in a sac called a follicle. About day 14 of the menstrual cycle, ovulation occurs and the egg is released from the ovary.

      Are They Dangerous?
      Symptoms
      Types of Ovarian Cysts
      How They Are Diagnosed
      How They Are Treated
      Can They Be Prevented?
      Diet and Ovarian Cysts

      Picture of Ovarian Cyst

      Are Ovarian Cysts Dangerous?
      Most are harmless “functional” or “physiologic” cysts. Between 4% and 10% of women of childbearing age develop a potentially serious metabolic dysfunction, known as polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). Multiple cysts are one hallmark of PCOS. PCOS also includes hormonal disruptions that can result in persistent acne, excessive body hair, thinning scalp hair, infertility, obesity, and increased risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and uterine or breast cancer.

      Ovarian cysts can cause discomfort during intercourse. They may bleed, rupture, or twist the ovary, causing significant pelvic pain. Sudden or severe pelvic pain, especially with vomiting or a fever, should be treated as a medical emergency.

      Some ovarian cysts can become cancerous. These are all rare cancers and are most common in women in their fifties. Cancerous ovaries are usually not painful unless they grow very large before they are discovered. Annual pelvic exams are the best preventative method for detecting gynecologic cancers in the early, most treatable stages.

      Top

      Ovarian Cyst Symptoms
      It’s not easy to know whether you have ovarian cysts. You can have cysts without any symptoms at all, or you may have vague abdominal symptoms that could suggest a number of health problems that are completely unrelated to ovarian cysts.

      Some abdominal conditions with symptoms similar to painful ovarian cysts are: appendicitis, diverticulitis, intestinal inflammation or obstruction, gall bladder disease, kidney stone, or bladder infection. Gynecologic problems with symptoms similar to ovarian cysts are: pelvic inflammatory disease, endometriosis, ectopic or tubal pregnancy, or mittleschmirtz, the pain some women feel at mid-cycle, after normal ovulation.

      In general, one or more of the following symptoms could be related to ovarian cysts:

      Menstrual irregularities.
      Pelvic pain – a dull ache, either constant or intermittent, possibly radiating to the low back or thighs.
      Pelvic pain during intercourse.
      Pelvic pain just before your period begins or just after it ends.
      A fullness or heaviness in your abdomen.
      Feeling of pressure on your bladder or rectum.
      Nausea or breast tenderness similar to when you’re pregnant.
      Continuous, creamy or clear-like-eggwhite vaginal discharge that persists unchanged for a month or more.
      Any of these symptoms are sufficient cause to consult with your health professional.

      If you have sudden, severe or spasmodic pain in your lower abdomen, especially if accompanied by fever, vomiting, or signs of shock (cold, clammy skin, rapid breathing, weakness), go immediately to the emergency room of the nearest hospital.

      Top
      Types of Benign Ovarian Cysts
      1) Functional (physiologic) cysts. The most common type of ovarian cyst is the functional cyst, also called a physiologic cyst. “Physiologic” means the cyst is non-pathogenic. It develops from tissue that changes during the process of ovulation. Your ovaries normally grow cystic structures called follicles each month. Typically, these resolve back to normal ovarian tissue after ovulation. But sometimes there is a glitch and the fluid-filled cyst stays on for a while.

      Functional cysts fall into two categories; follicular cyst, and corpus luteum cyst.

      Follicular cyst. The pituitary gland in your brain sends a message, by increasing luteinizing hormone (LH), to the follicle holding the ripening egg. This is called a “LH surge”. Normally, the egg is released from the follicle and starts down the fallopian tube where it may then become fertilized by a sperm cell. If the LH surge does not occur, the follicle doesn’t rupture or release its egg. Instead, it grows until it becomes a cyst. These cysts seldom cause pain, are usually harmless, and may disappear within two or three menstrual cycles.

      Corpus luteum cyst. When there is a successful LH surge and the egg is released, the follicle responds by becoming a new, temporarily little secretory gland called the corpus luteum. The corpus luteum produces large amounts of progesterone and a little bit of estrogen, to prepare the uterus for conception.
      But occasionally, after the egg is released, the escape hatch seals off prematurely and tissue accumulates inside, causing the corpus luteum to enlarge. This type of cyst will usually disappear after a few weeks. Rarely, a corpus luteum cyst can grow to 3″-4″ in diameter and potentially bleed into itself, or twist your ovary, thus causing pelvic or abdominal pain.

      2) Dermoid cyst. A dermoid cyst is mainly fat but can also contain a mix of different tissues. They are often small and usually don’t cause symptoms. Very rarely, they become large and rupture, causing bleeding into the abdomen, which is a medical emergency.

      3) Endometrioma or “chocolate cyst”. These are cysts that form when endometrial tissue (the type that lines the inside of the uterus) invades an ovary. It is responsive to monthly hormonal changes, which causes the cyst to fill with blood. It’s called a “chocolate cyst” because the blood is a dark, reddish-brown color. Multiple endometriomas are found in the condition called “endometriosis”. Although often asymptomatic, chocolate cysts can be painful, especially during your period or during intercourse.

      4) Cystadenoma. Cystadenomas are cysts that develop from cells on the surface of your ovary. They are usually benign. Occasionally, they can become quite large and thus interfere with abdominal organs and cause pain.

      5) Multiple cysts – the polycystic ovary. Women who don’t ovulate on a regular basis can develop multiple cysts. The ovaries are often enlarged and contain many small cysts clustered under a thickened, outer capsule. There are many factors causing a woman to not ovulate and develop polycystic ovaries. Polycystic ovarian syndrome is a complex condition that involves multiple hormonal and organ system dysfunction. Multiple ovarian cysts are just one facet of this disorder.

      Top

      How Ovarian Cysts are Diagnosed
      Pelvic Exam. An ovarian cyst may be discovered by your doctor during a pelvic exam, while she is palpating your ovaries. If a cyst is suspected, an ultrasound is usually the next step.

      Pelvic Ultrasound. Ultrasound is a painless procedure where sound waves are transmitted through your pelvic area and an image of your ovaries and uterus is shown on a video screen. The image is analyzed to determine the nature of the cyst.

      Laparoscopy. Laparoscopy is a surgical procedure performed when your doctor wants to see the cyst. A thin, lighted telescope, called a laparoscope, is inserted through a small incision into your abdomen. Laparoscopy may be used for treatment as well as diagnosis.

      Top

      How Ovarian Cysts are Usually Treated
      Watchful Waiting. If you have no symptoms and ultrasound shows a small, fluid-filled cyst, your doctor may simply schedule another pelvic exam and ultrasound in six weeks. The concept behind watchful waiting is to not actively treat the cyst until does not go away as your hormones change. An unchanging or growing cystic ovary needs further investigation.

      Birth Control Pills. If you have a functional cyst that is larger in size and causing some symptoms, birth control pills may be prescribed. The purpose of birth control pills is to alter your hormone levels so the cyst will shrink. Birth control pills will reduce the probability of other cysts growing.

      Surgery. Your cyst may be surgically removed if it is large, solid or filled with debris, persistently growing, irregularly shaped, or causing pain or other symptoms. If the cyst is not cancerous, it can be surgically removed without also removing the ovary. This is called a cystectomy. In some cases, the doctor may want to remove the affected ovary, while leaving the other intact in order to maintain your ability to have a normal hormone cycle.

      Top

      Can Ovarian Cysts Be Prevented?
      It may not be possible to completely eliminate ovarian cysts. However, you can minimize the probability that they will form and grow.

      You can do this in several fundamental ways:

      Improve the quality of your diet.
      Increase your exercise.
      Control chronic stress.
      Use bio-identical hormones, supplements and herbs to help balance your hormonal system.
      Improve your overall health.

      Top

      Diet and Ovarian Cysts
      A recent study from the Institute of Research Pharmacology in Italy analyzed the diet over a ten-year span of 225 women with benign ovarian cysts and 450 women who did not have ovarian cysts.

      The researchers discovered that the type of food eaten influenced the development of cysts. For example, they said that women who consumed the most beef and cheese developed the most ovarian cysts. In contrast, consumption of green vegetables provided a strong protective effect. This study makes it clear that what you eat will influence whether or not you develop ovarian cysts.

      We have written an in-depth diet ebook for women with PCOS. But the dietary recommendations in the ebook are the same for ovarian cysts. If you have this problem, consider purchasing The Natural Diet Solution to PCOS and Infertility ebook.

      Source: Chiaffarino F et al, Diet and risk of seromucinous benign ovarian cysts, Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol. 2003 Oct 10;110(2):196-200.


are ovarian cysts dangerous during pregnancy

Symptoms Of Burst Cyst In Ovaries

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    What happens when an ovarian cyst ruptures?
    When an ovarian cyst ruptures, can it cause more harm to your eggs? Will it decrease chances of pregnancy even more?

    • ANSWER:
      Ruptured ovarian cysts, as any woman who has had one will tell you, can be incredibly painful. Many women have ovarian cysts without even knowing it, and often they just disappear themselves. But sometimes they continue to grow, and if left untreated, the walls of the cyst will get thinner, and eventually it may burst, or rupture.

      It is unusual for the pain experienced from a ruptured ovarian cyst to be the first symptom a woman feels. Because the cyst is typically quite large before it ruptures, it usually causes a good deal of discomfort and pain.

      Typical symptoms include:

      - abdominal pain, particularly during the menstrual period
      - irregular menstrual cycles
      - feeling the need to urinate frequently (as the large cyst puts pressure on the bladder)
      - sometimes difficulty urinating
      - feeling of pressure or heaviness in the stomach

      The symptoms of a ruptured ovarian cyst are very similar, but usually the pain is much more intense. It also usually comes very suddenly – a cyst rupturing is like a water balloon bursting, so the pain is sharp and sudden. Thankfully, the severe pain is usually quite short lived (typically ebbing within 24 hours), and the pressure is relieved from the ‘balloon’ on your ovary.

      Mostly, after the rupture the ovary will heal itself, and there will be no further complications. But this is not always the case. The ovary can get infected, which if left untreated can have serious implications for your health and your ability to conceive.

      Sometimes, the rupture can cause the ovary to twist, restricting blood flow and causing severe pain. The wound may be slow to heal, so increasing the chance of scar tissue forming. Again, this can affect fertility.

      If you think your cyst might have ruptured, you should get medical attention right away. At the very least, you will probably need strong painkillers. If the intense pain does not subside after 24 hours, it is likely that the ovary has twisted or infection has set in. In this case, it is absolutely essential to get expert medical help.

      Once the cyst has ruptured, it is gone. If you only had one cyst, the problems it caused prior to the rupture should end. However, it is unfortunately quite likely that the cyst will come back again. Unless you do something to change them, the underlying problems which caused the cyst are still present.

      The natural holistic approach to treating and preventing ovarian cysts addresses these underlying causes. By getting your internal balance right, particularly through altering your diet and metabolism, you can get rid of your ovarian cysts for good – without drugs or surgery.
      Good luck

  2. QUESTION:
    Is a pulling type of abdominal pain a symptom of a ruptured ovarian cyst?
    I went to the er on tuesday thinking that I had a kidney stone. They did a CAT scan and determined that I ruptured an ovarian cyst. I have been having a type of pulling feeling on the side of the cyst along with nausea and a persistent achey feeling (kind of like when you get a cold or the flu). Is this normal? Thank you.

    • ANSWER:
      well since the cyst already burst you shouldn’t be feeling any severe pain anymore. I had three cysts burst in a 12 hour time frame and once they were done I felt so much better, just a little tired. your body just might be trying to repair itself now and your ovary might be a little inflamed or irritated from the rupture. usually nausea and that achey feeling just come with the cyst rupturing, they should go away soon. drink a lot of water and rest a lot and you should feel better in a few days.

  3. QUESTION:
    Is it possible for a cyst to burst, and if so, what are the symptoms? How dangerous is this?
    I have a ovarian cyst the size of a grapefruit, but cannot receive surgery just yet due to blood complications. For the past few days, I have had hot flashes and chills, have felt very nauseated, nd whenever I eat anything, it goes right through me. Are these possible symptoms that the cyst has burst? thank you guys for your time

    • ANSWER:
      I had an ovarian cyst about that size when I was 16.
      I went through a time of “just not feeling well”. I woke up one morning with gut wrenching pain. Horrible, horrible pain. I could only curl up in a ball and scream. My Mother drove me to the ER, I was given a shot of Demerol, and later, had an ultrasound done. Turns out I had a cyst that had burst!
      I was scheduled for surgery 5 days later (I had 2 pain attacks in that time) and they removed the cyst, along with my right ovary. Apparently it weighed about 3 lbs.
      It doesn’t sound like yours has burst. The cyst just being there can make you feel unwell.

  4. QUESTION:
    How do you know when you have a cyst on your ovary?
    What does it feel like?? I just had my period and worry that a feeling I cant describe has been bothering me. It doesn’t hurt it almost feels like there is pressure on my right ovary.

    • ANSWER:
      Ovarian cysts often cause no symptoms, however when symptoms are present, ovarian cysts may cause a dull ache or a sense of fullness or pressure in the abdomen. Pain during intercourse and at other times can also indicate the presence of ovarian cysts.

      Pain or pressure is caused by a number of factors such as size, bleeding or bursting of a cyst which irritates the abdominal tissues, or torsion (twisting of a cyst) which can block the flow of blood to the cyst.

      Other symptoms of ovarian cysts which might occur include delayed, irregular, or unusually painful periods. If you experience distension of your abdomen or any other symptoms, I recommend you go see your doctor immediately.

      Good luck :)

  5. QUESTION:
    What does it mean when your right ovary is cramping?
    What does it mean when your right ovary is cramping?
    my right ovary keeps cramping, the pain stops and goes its a dull pain, i started my period september 4th. some said that the right ovary is the one where your implanted egg came from. The reason that sides hurts now is because a cyst is form once the egg is released and once it is implanted and the egg leaves this area of the fallopian tubeovary it burst and so it hurts is that true?

    • ANSWER:
      Quite honestly i’m having a hard time understanding what you’ve been told. Both ovaries release eggs not just the right one. They take turns every month, so one month the right ovary will release eggs & the next month the left will. You possibly have a cyst & that’s why you are having pain. Most of the time cysts will go away on there on own but sometimes they don’t. Cysts can also cause other problems, for example they can rupture. If you continue to feel pain or if it gets worse you should go to your dr to make sure it’s nothing serious. If the pain gets unbearable or you develop other symptoms like nausea or vomiting & fever go to the er to rule out appendicitis. Good luck!


symptoms of burst cyst in ovaries

Ovariancancer.org

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    How do you prevent ovarian cancer? and how does the doctor check for it??
    IF it runs in the family, do your odds go up??????

    • ANSWER:
      Most of the cancers that run in the family have a certain genetic
      trend. It can be checked through genetic tests. But no use worrying about it. You can’t prevent it, the problem is detection
      in time. You feel nothing until its a bit too late. Therefore its good to go once a year to your gynecologist, he or she can feel your ovaries and check for changes also they will probably send you to have an MRI if it runs in your family. Read more here:

      http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ovariancancer.html

      http://www.ovariancancer.org/

      http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/types/ovarian

      http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/wyntk/ovary

      http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/ovarian-cancer/DS00293

  2. QUESTION:
    Is it possible to survive stage 4 cancer that has spread?
    My aunt has stage 4 cancer that started in her ovaries went to her stomach tissue and went into her lungs. She has been very healthy her whole life never smoked or drank. She is undergoing Chemo and surgery. Is it possible for her to survive? Or is it to late???

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, it is possible to survive stage IV cancer that has spread. People are individuals and not statistics. No one knows what will happen to your aunt. Stage IV is difficult to treat but it can be done and there are survivors . . no one, not even a doctor, can know if your aunt will or will not be one of them.

      I know survivors of advanced abdominal cancers . . no one could have predicted they would survive their cancer, but they did . . most of them underwent high dose chemotherapy for many months, extensive surgical debulking (often two surgeries to complete) stem cell transplant (or hyperthermic chemoperfusion) followed by whole abdominal radiation and adjuvant chemotherapy . . two of the survivors had extensive ovarian disease.

      I would suggest that your aunt join an online support group and ask questions of other advanced cancer patients who have survived a long time. It is also possible that even if the disease is not ‘cured’ that your aunt could find a treatment that will allow her to live with the cancer by controlling disease progression.

      Your aunt should try to contact the following groups:

      ACOR: Ovarian Cancer ListServ

      http://listserv.acor.org/SCRIPTS/WA-ACOR.EXE?A0=OVARIAN

      ACOR: The Gynecological Cancers Online Support Group

      http://listserv.acor.org/SCRIPTS/WA-ACOR.EXE?A0=GYN-ONC

      Share Support

      http://www.sharecancersupport.org/

      Ovarian Cancer National Alliance

      http://www.ovariancancer.org/

      There are many other resources out there that are far better than any ‘advice’ you might seek out here . . use them. good luck to your aunt.

  3. QUESTION:
    Does anybody know where i can find a cancer foundation that i can donate money to?
    a place that is like in/near bothell, lynwood, those places? around there>? please!!!
    in washington
    im doanting like 0 mabye more

    • ANSWER:

      http://www.breastcancerfund.org

      http://www.ovariancancer.org

      Start with these not-for-profit organizations.

  4. QUESTION:
    Is it true that benign cancerous cells can turn malignant even if treated?

    • ANSWER:
      Anything that is malignant is cancer.

      Anything that is cancer is malignant.

      Benign malformations are harmless, but sometimes, they can develop into cancer. Your doctor can discuss with you the possibility of this occurring.

      I don’t think your doctor was trying to be kind, but rather, informative.

      What you really need is some more in-depth information. Please visit these two websites:

      http://www.ovariancancer.org/

      http://www.ovarian.org/

      The provide information, outreach, and community support organizations. And, these sites will give you information on how to speak with your doctor, which isn’t always an easy thing to do.

      You sound like a strong person who has taken a positive step by going onto Answers to seek support/information. I commend you for being forward and actively seeking information. Your good spirit and positive energy is your most powerful weapon for healing yourself.

      Kind thoughts to you and all of God’s love.

      Drop in a follow up to let us know how you are doing.

  5. QUESTION:
    Information on ovarian cancer?
    Hello! I need all the information I can get on ovarian cancer. Would prefer the following-
    Symptoms
    Treatments
    Causes
    Average Age To Get It

    Or if you have a good website with this information. Thank-you!

    • ANSWER:

      http://www.ovariancancer.org/


ovariancancer.org

Ovarian Cyst And Pregnancy Chances

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Does having ovarian cysts decrease the chance of getting pregnant?
    I had an ovarian cyst rupture in April and the doctor said i still have one. Man does it hurt when those thing’s rupture. Never been in so much pain. Anyway do they decrease the chances of pregnancy?

    • ANSWER:
      I’m sorry that this has happened to you and I hope that you are feeling much better by now.

      For the majority of women, the presence of ovarian cysts has no impact on their ability to conceive.

      Typically, ovarian cysts do not interfere with ovulation or conception.

      You will need to consult with your gynecologist for an individual evaluation, but I would say that NO – the cysts will NOT decrease your chance of pregnancy.

      If you are not wanting to conceive yet, then you should be using some form of birth control.

      Good Luck! =)

  2. QUESTION:
    What happens when an ovarian cyst ruptures?
    When an ovarian cyst ruptures, can it cause more harm to your eggs? Will it decrease chances of pregnancy even more?

    • ANSWER:
      Ruptured ovarian cysts, as any woman who has had one will tell you, can be incredibly painful. Many women have ovarian cysts without even knowing it, and often they just disappear themselves. But sometimes they continue to grow, and if left untreated, the walls of the cyst will get thinner, and eventually it may burst, or rupture.

      It is unusual for the pain experienced from a ruptured ovarian cyst to be the first symptom a woman feels. Because the cyst is typically quite large before it ruptures, it usually causes a good deal of discomfort and pain.

      Typical symptoms include:

      - abdominal pain, particularly during the menstrual period
      - irregular menstrual cycles
      - feeling the need to urinate frequently (as the large cyst puts pressure on the bladder)
      - sometimes difficulty urinating
      - feeling of pressure or heaviness in the stomach

      The symptoms of a ruptured ovarian cyst are very similar, but usually the pain is much more intense. It also usually comes very suddenly – a cyst rupturing is like a water balloon bursting, so the pain is sharp and sudden. Thankfully, the severe pain is usually quite short lived (typically ebbing within 24 hours), and the pressure is relieved from the ‘balloon’ on your ovary.

      Mostly, after the rupture the ovary will heal itself, and there will be no further complications. But this is not always the case. The ovary can get infected, which if left untreated can have serious implications for your health and your ability to conceive.

      Sometimes, the rupture can cause the ovary to twist, restricting blood flow and causing severe pain. The wound may be slow to heal, so increasing the chance of scar tissue forming. Again, this can affect fertility.

      If you think your cyst might have ruptured, you should get medical attention right away. At the very least, you will probably need strong painkillers. If the intense pain does not subside after 24 hours, it is likely that the ovary has twisted or infection has set in. In this case, it is absolutely essential to get expert medical help.

      Once the cyst has ruptured, it is gone. If you only had one cyst, the problems it caused prior to the rupture should end. However, it is unfortunately quite likely that the cyst will come back again. Unless you do something to change them, the underlying problems which caused the cyst are still present.

      The natural holistic approach to treating and preventing ovarian cysts addresses these underlying causes. By getting your internal balance right, particularly through altering your diet and metabolism, you can get rid of your ovarian cysts for good – without drugs or surgery.
      Good luck

  3. QUESTION:
    If i had an ovarian cyst removed does it reduce the chance of pregnancy?
    first of all i am 14 years old and i might just have a ovarian cyst thats causing lots of pain in my right side.

    if i was to get this cyst removed will it reduce the chance that i will be able to get pregnant in the future? thanks :)

    • ANSWER:
      Nope, I have Pcos and discovered it when I was pregnant for my son. After his birth I had surgery to remove cysts from my ovaries. I have a daughter that was born about 2 years after the surgery, but I was on birth control up till then to prevent the cysts from growing back. Birth control is part of the treatment therapy for pcos. Good luck, I think you will have plenty of very annoying loud children to make you happy:) Careful what you wish for:)LOL! jUst kidding kids are great and I wish you the best:)

  4. QUESTION:
    Which activities are likely to cause an ovarian cyst to twist or rupture?
    I am 13 weeks pregnant with an 8cm ovarian cyst. I hope to avoid surgery during pregnancy, and want to know what I can do to try to lessen my chances of a twisted or ruptured cyst.
    I am especially curious about women who have had complications? What were you doing when the cyst twisted or ruptured?

    • ANSWER:
      Bending could possibly affect a cyst such as by rupture (an example only) depending on how much bending you do. A fall could also possibly affect a cyst (another example only).

      I would recommend checking with your OB/GYN as well when you go in for your next check-up to see what they say.

      In the mean time here’s the link to a site that might help you find even more information. The link is at: http://forums.obgyn.net/pregnancy-birth

  5. QUESTION:
    What is the main ovarian cyst symptoms?
    Is it true that ovarian cyst symptoms are the same as pregnancy symptoms.
    I’ve read some answers here saying that but I don’t think that’s true.

    • ANSWER:
      The number of women suffering from ovarian cyst has caused concern for other women everywhere. The alarming growth of incidents may indicate that no one is immune to this dreaded reproductive problem. In recent years, millions of women from all walks of life have experienced having ovarian cyst, and chances are you too might have one as well. So it is vital that you learn the ovarian cyst symptoms to detect the disease as quickly as possible.

      First you have to remember that ovarian cyst symptoms are different depending on its type. An ovarian cyst could either be one of the following: functional cyst, polycystic ovaries, endometrial cysts, cytadenomas and dermoid cysts. The symptoms of each of these types are different because their growth is not the same.

      It is hard to tell the cysts on ovaries symptoms in its early development, which is definitely a bad news to all the women. They might just mistake the symptoms as part of their menstrual period. But if the pain gets really excruciating, then it is definitely not the ordinary menstrual cramp, it could be ovarian cyst already.

      Recurring back aches could also be signs of having ovarian cyst. If your back is constantly aching, you should see your doctor quick for an examination. Lower back pain could also be a signal that you have cyst on ovary.

      If you notice tenderness in your breasts, it may also be one of the ovarian cyst symptoms. See your doctor at once if you notice clearly the obvious change in your breasts. Irregular menstrual period is also one of the symptoms of having this type of reproductive disease.

      If you feel like you always want to vomit, then you might be suffering from this disease as well. Women who are still in their reproductive years may simply mistake it as being a sign of pregnancy. But they might already be suffering from ovarian cyst if the feeling of vomiting is frequent.

      Pain during sex may also indicate that you have ovarian cyst. In case it would be your first time to experience pain during your intimate moments with hubby, then it should be a cause for concern. The growing cyst in your ovary is causing the pain.

      Problem in bowel movement is another symptom of having ovarian cyst. Women should not ignore if they have frequent constipation as it may be one of the ovarian cyst symptoms. You might also be developing cyst on ovary if you feel a constant abdominal pain accompanied by pressure.

      Visit your doctor at once for ovarian cyst treatment if you are suffering from any of the symptoms mentioned above. Although most of the symptoms are also connected with other reproductive problems, it is better to be safe than sorry.


ovarian cyst and pregnancy chances

Ovarian Cyst Pain Radiating Down Leg

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    How far will the pain extend if something is wrong with your ovary?
    My left ovary has been hurting. I am now having pains all the way up to my waist line on that same side. Could that still be related to my ovary like if I have a cyst or something? PLease help

    • ANSWER:
      It could be related to an Ovarian Cyst, it could be twisted around behind your uterus (nothing to worry about as you would have been born that way barring an accident) or just heavy cramping. Mine varies each month from not having really any cramping to having it radiate down my legs, through my back and all sides. Terrible stuff when that happens. My Hubby runs for cover, lol. Next time you visit your OB-Gyn, tell them how you are feeling. They may do an ultra sound to see what is going on. Be prepared as it could be either external, internal or both in order for them to see what they need to. Neither hurts but internally you will feel some pressure and externally they will often have you drink a ton of water until you think you are going to burst and then they will do it pressing on your belly. In the end, you will know what it is. If it is ovarian cysts, they will usually put you on bc pills to take care of it. No worries! :-)
  2. QUESTION:
    Do ovarian cysts sometimes send pain radiating to your thigh?
    I think I have cysts on my right ovary. I’ve had them before (surgically removed) and now I’m feeling the same kind of pain… and sometimes it radiates to my inner thigh, like where my leg connects to my body. Just wondering if this is typical. Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      My cyst actually gave me pain in my side right where it was, but it also radiated up my side and down my leg when I moved the wrong way. I’m not exactly sure if its typical, but it definitely happened to me.
  3. QUESTION:
    What were your symptoms with ovarian cysts?
    Experiences?

    • ANSWER:
      I had shooting pains in the ovary area that radiated down my legs. They were very painful. Some women can have cyst and not have any symptoms at all.
  4. QUESTION:
    Are There Any Home Remedies For Ovarian Cysts ?
    Itss mostly painful on the right side in my back , into my thighs , & down my leg . But , at times it radiates iAlso feel gurgling or popping and stabbing.pains in that area . Whenever iLay down It literally feels like some huge ball is tryna stretch my stomach & iCan literally feel the cyst . I also have boob pain rarely , & frequent urination . Im sick & tired of this of this . My mother thinks itss all jn my head , but its not -_-

    • ANSWER:
  5. QUESTION:
    Sharp twinges left side of uterus?
    I’m 6 dpo and experiencing sharp twinges in my uterus, but only on the left side.
    It is a pain that sort of radiates down my left leg.

    Never experienced this before? What’s up with it?

    • ANSWER:
      could be an ovarian cyst

 

ovarian cyst pain radiating down leg

Laparoscopic Ovarian Cystectomy Procedure

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    has any one had surgery for a ovarian cyst?
    plzz anser how safe is it if its about the size or samar than a plum

    • ANSWER:
      You are certainly not alone – ovarian cysts, or fluid-filled masses, are quite prevalent in women, ages 20-35. It is often the case that cysts have no symptoms and are only discovered in a routine physical exam. Sometimes cysts cause pain, pelvic pressure or even nausea, and that is when your doctor would probably want to intervene. Note though that (s)/he may recommend a course of birth control pills for a month or two to try to reduce the size of the cyst. If the cyst is greater than 2 inches or if it doesn’t go away, you might have what is called a “persistent ovulation-related cyst.” At this point, your doctor may want to drain the cyst or remove it entirely through surgery. The latter procedure is called a cystectomy, and if the cyst is found to be non-cancerous, the surgeon will most likely be able to leave your ovary intact. Of course, any surgery has risks (infection, cyst may come back, etc), but should your doctor recommend surgery, do not be alarmed. It is a very common procedure and you should be able to resume normal activities within 4 to 6 weeks (and significantly less time should you have a laparoscopic procedure, an incision through your belly button). Talk to your doctor about the type of procedure (s)/he is plannign on using (laparotomy or laparoscopy), and don’t be afraid to get a 2nd opinion! For more information on ovarian cysts and available treatments, check out http://health.ivillage.com/gyno/gynoovaries/topics/0,,4v5c,00.html?searcht. Good luck and good health!!


laparoscopic ovarian cystectomy procedure

Leg Pain Due To Ovarian Cyst

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    What to expect for a first pelvic exam?
    What should I expect for my first pelvic exam? What’s the average age for girls getting it? What do they do? Do they do anything else besides the pelvic exam? Will I have to go sooner because I get many ovarian cysts? I will most likely feel uncomfortable right?

    I know I feel uncomfortable just going to my regular doctor when they do the breast exam, and vaginal exam they just looked down there, no touching. And they really aren’t even doing anything. I feel uncomfortable just talking about it.

    So if anyone can answer my questions I’d greatly appreciate it!

    • ANSWER:
      Usually a girl will start going for a first pelvic examination at a gynaecologist when she starts to have sex, turn 18 or have any female related problems such as ovarian cysts.

      You may have a few examinations done, which will usually include the following:

      A pelvic exam is a way for your gynaecologist to examine your female organs and check for any gynaecological problems.

      You may be worried about your first pelvic exam. It’s very normal to be anxious about something when you don’t know what to expect. Hopefully after reading this, you will be reassured that it is simple, isn’t painful and takes only about 5 minutes. It is also normal to feel embarrassed or uneasy about your first exam, I still feel embarrassed with mine and I’ve had may many pelvic examinations over the past 9 years due to female related problems I’m experiencing. I actually just went to see my gyno about 6 weeks ago for a follow up appointment after being diagnosed with endometriosis a few months ago and it really is a simple, painless examination that literally only takes a couple of minutes.

      However, if you know what to expect, it may help you relax. I’m sure your gyno understands how you feel and will be sensitive and gentle, and answer any questions you have.

      There are other important reasons to have a pelvic exam. These may include:

      - Unexplained pain in your lower belly or around the pelvic area, where your vagina is;
      - Vaginal discharge or wetness on your underwear that causes itching, burning or smells bad;
      - No menstrual periods by age 15 or 16;
      - Vaginal bleeding that lasts more than 10 days;
      - Missed periods; especially if you are having sex;
      - A history of ovarian cysts (like you mentioned);
      - Menstrual cramps so bad that you miss school or work.

      During your first check up your gyno will ask you questions about:

      - Your general health, allergies and medications you are taking;
      - Your menstrual period, such as how old you were when you first got it, how long it lasts, how often it comes, how much you bleed , the first day that your last period started, if you have cramps; and at what age your breasts started to develop.
      - Whether you have ever had sex or have been sexually abused.
      - If you have vaginal itchiness or an unusual discharge or odor from your vagina.

      If you are under 18 and find it comforting a friend or your Mum can go with you. If your gyno is a male, then you have the right to ask for a nurse to be in the room while he does the examination, however these days (when you have a male gynaecologist), there will be a nurse present during the examination.

      After you have given your medical history, been weighed and had your blood pressure checked, you will be asked to put on a gown. You will need to remove your clothes including your underwear and bra. A breast exam is often done as a routine part of this check-up.

      Your gyno will explain the steps to the exam and ask you to lie down on the exam table. You will be given a sheet to put over your stomach and legs. You will then be asked to move down to the end of the table and place your feet in stirrups (these are holders for your feet). With your knees bent, you will be asked to let your knees fall to each side allowing your legs to spread apart. This is usually the part when most women feel embarrassed. This feeling is normal too. Just remember that although this is your first exam, this is routine for your gyno and their only concern is for your health.

      There are 3 parts to this exam. Sometimes not all parts of the pelvic exam are necessary. Ask your gyno which part or parts will be done for your examination.

      Your gyno will first look at the area outside of your vagina, (clitoris, labia, vaginal opening, and rectum).

      Now some information about the papsmear. The speculum is an instrument made of metal or plastic. Your gyno will place the speculum into your vagina. After it is inserted, it will be gently opened so that your gyno can see your vagina and your cervix (the opening to your uterus).

      After checking your vagina and cervix, your gyno may take a thin plastic stick and a special tiny brush or a small “broom” and gently wipe away some of the cells from your cervix. This is a pap smear, which detects early changes of the cervix before they become cancer. Most girls have normal pap smears.

      If you are having vaginal discharge, your gyno will take another sample to check for yeast and other causes of discharge. If you are having sex, your gyno will take another sample from the cervix to check for sexually transmitted diseases. When all of these samples have been taken, your doctor will close the speculum and gently take it out.

      When the exam is over, your gyno will answer any questions you have and tell you when to make your next appointment. He/she will also talk to you about any medications you may need and tell you when and how you will get the results of the exam.

      I hope this information helps you out. Best of luck and remember to try to relax. If at any time during your examination, you feel uncomfortable or anything causes pain, you have the right to stop your gyno and let him/her know.

      Good luck :)

  2. QUESTION:
    Could trauma to my lower abdomen cause ovarian torsion/ruptures?
    I’m in martial arts and a few weeks ago was kicked pretty hard when my practice partner wasn’t paying attention. I felt okay afterward, but, when my period came a few days after, it was so painful and lighter than normal, although it lasted as long as it normally does. Since then, I’ve had some light pain in my lower left abdomen every once in awhile and am feeling sciatic nerve pain. I’m also wondering if the sciatica could be caused by my constant leg crossing while sitting.

    • ANSWER:
      I don’t think it would cause it, but if it’s already there, it would worsen it. That is, I lost an ovary due to torsion. Some months before that time, I fell really hard and hit that area. The pain was excruciating for a day or two, then went away. But months later, the cyst caused torsion and I lost the ovary.

      Was your period early? Maybe the trauma brought it on.

  3. QUESTION:
    what do they do in a gynaecologist internal exam?
    i’m just about to go to the gynaecologist for the first time and i wanted to know what they will do to my vagina. my friends say they put a load of metal things up there is this true? and does it hurt?

    also can a gynaecologist be a man?

    xxxx

    • ANSWER:
      You may be worried about your first pelvic exam. It’s very normal to be anxious about something when you don’t know what to expect. Hopefully after reading this, you will be reassured that it is simple, isn’t painful and takes only about 5 minutes. It is also normal to feel embarrassed or uneasy about your first exam, I still feel embarrassed with mine and I’ve had may many pelvic examinations over the past 9 years due to female related problems I’m experiencing. I actually just went to see my gyno about 6 weeks ago for a follow up appointment after being diagnosed with endometriosis a few months ago and it really is a simple, painless examination that literally only takes a couple of minutes.

      However, if you know what to expect, it may help you relax. I’m sure your gyno understands how you feel and will be sensitive and gentle, and answer any questions you have.

      There are other important reasons to have a pelvic exam. These may include:

      - Unexplained pain in your lower belly or around the pelvic area, where your vagina is;
      - Vaginal discharge or wetness on your underwear that causes itching, burning or smells bad;
      - No menstrual periods by age 15 or 16;
      - Vaginal bleeding that lasts more than 10 days;
      - Missed periods; especially if you are having sex;
      - A history of ovarian cysts (like you mentioned);
      - Menstrual cramps so bad that you miss school or work.

      During your first check up your gyno will ask you questions about:

      - Your general health, allergies and medications you are taking;
      - Your menstrual period, such as how old you were when you first got it, how long it lasts, how often it comes, how much you bleed , the first day that your last period started, if you have cramps; and at what age your breasts started to develop.
      - Whether you have ever had sex or have been sexually abused.
      - If you have vaginal itchiness or an unusual discharge or odor from your vagina.

      If you are under 18 and find it comforting a friend or your Mum can go with you. If your gyno is a male, then you have the right to ask for a nurse to be in the room while he does the examination, however these days (when you have a male gynaecologist), there will be a nurse present during the examination.

      After you have given your medical history, been weighed and had your blood pressure checked, you will be asked to put on a gown. You will need to remove your clothes including your underwear and bra. A breast exam is often done as a routine part of this check-up.

      Your gyno will explain the steps to the exam and ask you to lie down on the exam table. You will be given a sheet to put over your stomach and legs. You will then be asked to move down to the end of the table and place your feet in stirrups (these are holders for your feet). With your knees bent, you will be asked to let your knees fall to each side allowing your legs to spread apart. This is usually the part when most women feel embarrassed. This feeling is normal too. Just remember that although this is your first exam, this is routine for your gyno and their only concern is for your health.

      There are 3 parts to this exam. Sometimes not all parts of the pelvic exam are necessary. Ask your gyno which part or parts will be done for your examination.

      Your gyno will first look at the area outside of your vagina, (clitoris, labia, vaginal opening, and rectum).

      Now some information about the papsmear. The speculum is an instrument made of metal or plastic. Your gyno will place the speculum into your vagina. After it is inserted, it will be gently opened so that your gyno can see your vagina and your cervix (the opening to your uterus).

      After checking your vagina and cervix, your gyno may take a thin plastic stick and a special tiny brush or a small “broom” and gently wipe away some of the cells from your cervix. This is a pap smear, which detects early changes of the cervix before they become cancer. Most girls have normal pap smears.

      If you are having vaginal discharge, your gyno will take another sample to check for yeast and other causes of discharge. If you are having sex, your gyno will take another sample from the cervix to check for sexually transmitted diseases. When all of these samples have been taken, your doctor will close the speculum and gently take it out.

      When the exam is over, your gyno will answer any questions you have and tell you when to make your next appointment. He/she will also talk to you about any medications you may need and tell you when and how you will get the results of the exam.

      Yes a gynecologist can be a man
      Good luck

  4. QUESTION:
    Im 17 weeks pregnant and for about the last 2 hours it really hurts when i walk.?
    the lower part of where my uterus is hurts very bad when i walk.. it almost feels like when you pull a muscle really badly.. it hurts when i move my legs when i walk even when i sit.. im kind of scared this could be the beginings of a miscarriage.. anyone ever havev that hapen to them?

    • ANSWER:
      no……..its probably (most likely) round ligiment pain! your muscles around your uterus stretch and cause alot of pain! like cant walk or stand long, or sit in weird position! there is nothing you can do about it its caused by the weight of the uterus! you can take a tylenol and put your legs up!

      Pregnancy, Round Ligament Pain Overview
      Abdominal pain during pregnancy is common. Most often it is a result of round ligament pain. Round ligament pain is due to normal changes that take place as your body is transformed by pregnancy. There are other, abnormal, treatable causes of pain that your health care provider may want to check. Therefore, any new or significant pain should be reported to your doctor.

      Pregnancy, Round Ligament Pain Causes
      Round ligament pain refers to a type of pelvic pain caused by stretching of the round ligaments. This occurs more commonly on the right side of the pelvis.

      Your uterus is normally the size of a pear. Thick ligaments, one of which is called the round ligament, hold your uterus in suspension within your abdomen. As the uterus grows in size and weight, these ligaments become very long and thin, stressing and tensing like rubber bands.
      The ligaments pull and tug on nearby nerve fibers and sensitive structures, causing pain. The severity of pain can worry you. Although round ligament pain is uncomfortable, it is also very normal.
      A ligament spasm, an involuntary contraction or cramp, usually triggers a sharp pain. These spasms are found more frequently on the right side than the left because of the normal tendency of the uterus to turn to the right.
      You might awaken at night with pain after having suddenly rolled over in your sleep.
      The pain may also be brought on by exercise.
      Pregnancy, Round Ligament Pain Symptoms
      Pain from stretching uterine ligaments can be severe and can be confused with causes outside your pregnancy. Pregnant women often feel acute abdominal pain when the cause is something more serious, such as the following:

      Appendicitis – An inflammation of the appendix located in your right lower abdomen. You initially have poor appetite, nausea, vomiting, fever, and, as the inflammation progresses, worsening pain. As you move further along in your pregnancy, the pain from appendicitis will be felt in the upper abdomen instead on the lower abdomen because of your growing uterus.

      Pain in ovaries or cysts. The ovary located in this area may twist, or a cyst may rupture, causing sudden severe abdominal pain. The pain may also indicate a ruptured ovarian cyst.

      Abnormal growths in the abdominal area

      Cramps because of slow digestion caused by pregnancy (These occur in the ascending colon and cecum, located in the right lower part of your abdomen.)
      When to Seek Medical Care
      Describe your pain, and any other symptoms, to your health care provider, who will assess whether to send you to a hospital’s emergency department. Do not hesitate to seek emergency care if any of the following symptoms occur.

      Fever

      Chills

      Pain on urination

      Difficulty walking

      this is some info i gathered very quickly on this website:

      http://www.webmd.com/baby/pregnancy-round-ligament-pain

      go to it and you can read all the info!! dont worry by the time you are done your feel bads will feel bad

  5. QUESTION:
    What can cause pain during orgasm?
    I’m a 24 year old woman and apart from being a heavy woman I am relatively healthy. However for the last couple of weeks I have been jumping from spotting to light bleeding after about3 months of not bleeding.The lack of bleeding I know is mostly due to my birth control. Tonight my boyfriend and I were intimate and it was uncomfortable and slightly painful for me when I finally reached orgasm I had a sharp pain shoot through my lower right abdomen felt much like a muscle spam in the leg but worse and my stomach is still hurting me now almost an hour later.What is going on?

    • ANSWER:
      the most common reasons would be muscle spasms, endometriosis, ovarian cysts or fibroids. I would have it checked out if it continues.


leg pain due to ovarian cyst

Post Menopausal Ovarian Cyst Pain

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    What is PCOS and how do you know you have it?
    And would a rutine trip to the ob be able to diagnosis it.
    p.s. I dont have it. But I keep hearing about it on this site. But know one is really explaining what it is??

    • ANSWER:
      PCOS (Polycystic Ovary Syndrome) is an endocrine disorder that affects approximately one in ten women. It occurs amongst all races and nationalities, is the most common hormonal disorder among women of reproductive age, and is a leading cause of infertility.

      The principal features are weight problems, lack of regular ovulation and/or menstruation and excessive amounts or effects of androgenic (masculinizing) hormones. The symptoms and severity of the syndrome vary greatly between women. While the causes are unknown, insulin resistance, diabetes and obesity are all strongly correlated with PCOS.

      Common symptoms of PCOS include:

      * Oligomenorrhea, amenorrhea — irregular, few, or absent menstrual periods; cycles that do occur may be heavy (heavy bleeding is also an early warning sign of endometrial cancer(in post menopausal women), for which women with PCOS are at slightly higher risk).
      * Infertility, generally resulting from chronic anovulation (lack of ovulation).
      * Hirsutism – unwanted body hair, typically in a male pattern affecting face, chest and legs.
      * Dyspareunia – pain during sexual intercourse.
      * Androgenic alopecia – male-pattern baldness.
      * Acne, oily skin, seborrhea.
      * Acanthosis nigricans – dark patches of skin, tan to dark brown or black, a sign of insulin resistance, which is associated with PCOS.
      * Acrochordons (skin tags) – tiny flaps of skin.
      * Prolonged periods of PMS-like symptoms (bloating, mood swings, pelvic pain, backaches).
      * Mild symptoms of hyperandrogenism, such as acne or hyperseborrhea, are frequent in adolescent girls and are often associated with irregular menstrual cycles. In most instances, these symptoms are transient and only reflect the immaturity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovary axis during the first years following menarche.

      It is important to know that PCOS can present in any age. Many can be diagnosed as young children, some might not present until after menopause. It is vital to find a PCOS knowledgeable doctor to catch this disorder as many miss the diagnoses – sometimes for years.

      Not all women with PCOS have polycystic ovaries (PCOS), nor do all women with ovarian cysts have PCOS; although a pelvic ultrasound is a major diagnostic tool, it is not the only one. Diagnosis can be difficult, particularly because of the wide range of symptoms and the variability in presentation (which is why this disorder is characterized as a syndrome rather than a disease).

      Standard diagnostic assessments:

      * History-taking, specifically for menstrual pattern, obesity, hirsutism, and the absence of breast discharge.

      * Gynecologic ultrasonography, specifically looking for ovarian cysts. These are believed to be the result of failed ovulation, reflecting the infrequent or absent menstruation that is typical of the condition. In normal menstruation, eggs are released from follicles – essentially cysts that burst to release the egg. One dominant follicle emerges with each menstrual cycle, and after ovulation the follicle remnant shrinks and disappears. In PCOS, failure of ovulation means that the follicles remain in the ovaries for many months. There may be 10 or more in each ovary, and on ultrasound examination they may give the appearance of a ‘string of pearls’. The numerous follicles mean that the ovaries are generally 1.5 to 3 times larger than normal.

      * Laparoscopic examination may reveal a thickened, smooth, pearl-white outer surface of the ovary. (This would usually be an incidental finding if laparoscopy were performed for some other reason, as it would not be routine to examine the ovaries in this way to confirm a diagnosis of PCOS).

      * Elevated serum (blood) levels of androgens (male hormones), including dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) and testosterone: free testosterone is more sensitive than total; free androgen index is often used as a substitute.

      * Some other blood tests are suggestive but not diagnostic. The ratio of LH (Luteinizing hormone) to FSH (Follicle stimulating hormone) is greater than 1:1, as tested on Day 3 of the menstrual cycle. The pattern is not very specific and was present in less than 50% in one study. There are often low levels of sex hormone binding globulin.

      I hope this helps answer your question. Good luck :)

  2. QUESTION:
    can a cyst on ovaries cause a period not to come on?
    I have had a abnormal pap read went for the follow up they said they didnt see anything but someonwe bought this up in my last questions, what are the symptoms of cervical cancer?

    • ANSWER:
      * Cystadenomas. These cysts develop from cells on the outer surface of the ovary. They are often filled with a watery fluid or thick, sticky gel. They can become large and cause pain.
      * Dermoid cysts. The cells in the ovary are able to make hair, teeth, and other growing tissues that become part of a forming ovarian cyst. These cysts can become large and cause pain.
      * Polycystic ovaries. The eggs mature within the follicles, or sacs, but the sac doesn’t break open to release the egg. The cycle repeats, follicles continue to grow inside the ovary, and cysts form.
      What are the symptoms of ovarian cysts?
      Many women have ovarian cysts without having any symptoms. Sometimes, though, a cyst will cause these problems:

      * pressure, fullness, or pain in the abdomen
      * dull ache in the lower back and thighs
      * problems passing urine completely
      * pain during sexual intercourse
      * weight gain
      * painful menstrual periods and abnormal bleeding
      * nausea or vomiting
      * breast tenderness

      Cervical cancer symptoms:

      Symptoms

      Pre-cancerous cervical conditions are generally painless. They are not easily detected unless the patient has a pelvic exam and a Pap smear. Symptoms include:

      * Abnormal bleeding. This happens only after the cervical cells become cancerous and invade neighboring tissues.
      * Unusual vaginal discharge
      * Increased bleeding during menstruation
      * Bleeding between regular menstrual periods or after sexual intercourse, douching or a pelvic exam
      * Difficulty or pain in urination
      * Pain during intercourse
      * Pain in the pelvic area
      * Pre- or post-menopausal bleeding.

  3. QUESTION:
    occasional stabbing pain near ovary area?
    my left side, near the ovary area. i am having mild to serious pain that comes on as stabbing and lasts a few seconds and goes away. i am post menopausal(thanks to chemo 5 years ago). i am 50 years old. any ideas. do i need the ER ?

    • ANSWER:
      Yeah you should probably go to the ER. You might have an ovarian cyst.

  4. QUESTION:
    Does anyone know what a Blood Disorder is?
    My mother just found out that she has a blood disorder (menorrhagia) and I was on the web and I did find out some information however, I would like to know if anyone has had this before? Or does anyone knows someone who has had a blood disorder and what happened? I know that there is know cure however, I am just curious because I have never heard of a blood disorder before until my mother is diagnosed with it.

    Thank you for reading..

    • ANSWER:
      Hi there! I’m sorry your mother has a blood disorder. The previous poster is correct, that there are many diff. blood disorders. I had a blood disorder myself, known as thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) and my cousin had one known as idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). I suspect that others in my family also have diff. bleeding disorders, but they are undiagnosed.

      I could tell you what happened to me when I had TTP, but my story is not only very diff. than those of others with TTP, it’s EXTREMELY different than the stories of people who have totally different blood disorders! Different blood disorders affect people differently.

      I believe what your mother has is really heavy, prolonged menstrual periods. I have family members who have the same problem. If the doctors have not found the cause of it, there may be more tests to pinpoint what’s causing it. It’s possible that this bleeding symptom/disorder is caused by an underlying clotting or bleeding disorder of another name. In the case of my family members it seems to be caused by cysts on their ovaries (not sure if they have polycystic ovarian syndrome or not), rather than a bleeding or clotting disorder, though in the case of at least one of them, I think it’s a combination of a bleeding disorder and ovarian cysts, since she’s a pretty free bleeder. At least I assume ovarian cysts are to blame. While most ovarian cysts apparently do not bother women, four of my cousins experience very painful, heavy periods, and at least one of them has extremely prolonged periods (but they are also very irregular so she may not bleed for months, although she is not pregnant and tests negative for pregnancy, and then bleed for over a month). All of these women, except for one, have shown to have ovarian cysts, and I am not sure if the other one was even checked for cysts. Also, the one who didn’t bleed for months and then started bleeding for months (this is NOT an exaggeration- she has bled for at least over a month and it only stopped then due to a heavy dose of hormones recieved at the doctors) did show polyps, and the doctors seemed satisfied for this as the cause of her issues.

      The cousin who bled for over a month has had to have blood transfusions twice due to prolonged and heavy menstruation (her case reminds me a lot of the lady who posted above me- bleeding up to a month, ovarian cysts, and anemia), so if your mother bleeds badly enough, she may eventually require the same, but I do not know the extent of her bleeding and am not a dr. Therefore, I couldn’t say for sure. That cousin also takes iron pills, and an extremely heavy dose of bc (I dunno if they said 2 or if they said 4 times as much as the usual dose) to balance out her hormone levels enough to allow her not to bleed this much. Another takes the pills to ease the pain. Your mother may or may not wish to take them, but if she does, likely the dose would depend on her own hormone levels. Also, iron pills may be suggested if she has heavy bleeding.

      Besides the ovarian cysts, there’s also endometriosis as a possible cause, as well as bleeding and clotting disorders like VWD. VWD is something I’ve read about before called von willebrand disease. I just did a web search for your mother’s issue and came across an article concerning the top 10 causes of heavy menstrual bleeding. The first listed was hormonal imbalance. PCOS (polycystic ovarian syndrome, by the way, involves hormonal imbalance), but isn’t mentioned in the article. Instead, the article talks about women during their adolescent years, and during menopause, may have heavier bleeding than at other times. You do not mention your mother’s age, but if she’s nearing menopause (peri-menopausal) she may be having some hormonal fluctuations that are to blame. The article also mentions uterine fibroids, cervial polyps, endometrial polyps, Lupus, pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), cervical cancer (don’t freak out- cervical cancer is pretty rare, from what I’ve heard), Endometrial cancer, IUDs or intrauterine birth control devices, and bleeding disorders. It also mentions that VWD is the most likely culprit if it is a bleeding disorder.

      http://womenshealth.about.com/od/abnormalbleeding/a/causemenorrhagi.htm

      Okay, ironically, I was looking up endometriosis and heavy bleeding because I was pretty sure it was a symptom of it- and it is- when I came across a site that said injectable contraception (depo provera) can cause heavy or prolonged bleeding, which makes me question the ability and competancy of my one cousin’s doctors, since they are giving her depo provera shots to prevent this very thing.

      Anyway, this other page lists these causes: Unexplained (it says about half the cases have unexplained causes), contraceptive coil (IUD), injectable contraceptive (depo provera), pelvic disorders- ex. listed are fibroids, polyps, pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), endometriosis, Endometrial hyperplasia (thickening of uterine lining), endometrial cancer, hormonal imbalance, hypothyroidism, blood clotting disorders, and anticoagulant drugs.

      Here’s the link: http://www.womenshealthlondon.org.uk/leaflets/bleeding/bleeding.html

      I also found out that vitamin K deficiancy can even be a culprit. See here. http://www.womentowomen.com/menstruation/menorrhagia.aspx
      This article also mentions the importance of iron supplements and hormonal support.

      This bleeding disorder I had- TTP- can cause heavy menstrual bleeding as well as spotting and alternatively, it can cause less bleeding due to intense clotting/ Yet, it is highly unlikely your mother has this disease. It’s rare, and the doctors would prob. have noticed it during her blood work up.

      The heavy and prolonged menstrual bleeding is a bleeding condition which may or may not have a bleeding disorder as the underlying cause. Your mother will likely need to take iron supplements, she may be given medicines to help deal with her hormones if they are found to be the problem, and she could opt for a hysterectomy, BUT that carries with it, its own issues, and your mother may not want to go that route. I’d personally want to avoid that if I could, but it’s an individual choice, based on individual situations. Your mother’s treatment will also be based on the root cause of her heavy, prolonged bleeding.

  5. QUESTION:
    Painful Cysts on Ovaries?
    I get cysts on my ovaries that rupture!! It is one of the most painful feelings other than giving birth. They are fine while taking Birth Control but my hubby and I are planning to stop having kids. He can get a vasectomy but I will still have the cyst on my ovary problem. I do NOT want to take Birth control forever!!! IUDs don’t work for me and pills make me crazy! Any suggestions on a solution?

    • ANSWER:
      You may want to see if your doctor can do something to remove the cyst, or you may be able to get your ovaries removed (Which is called an Oophorectomy, or a Bilateral Oophorectomy if you get both removed)

      And I just looked this part up on Wikipedia.com for you:
      About 95% of ovarian cysts are benign, meaning they are not cancerous. Treatment for cysts depends on the size of the cyst and symptoms. For small, asymptomatic cysts, the wait and see approach with regular check-ups will most likely be recommended.

      ***** Pain caused by ovarian cysts may be treated with:
      pain relievers, including acetaminophen (Tylenol), nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), or narcotic pain medicine (by prescription) may help reduce pelvic pain. NSAIDs usually work best when taken at the first signs of the pain. a warm bath, or heating pad, or hot water bottle applied to the lower abdomen near the ovaries can relax tense muscles and relieve cramping, lessen discomfort, and stimulate circulation and healing in the ovaries. Bags of ice covered with towels can be used alternately as cold treatments to increase local circulation
      combined methods of hormonal contraception such as the combined oral contraceptive pill — the hormones in the pills may regulate the menstrual cycle, prevent the formation of follicles that can turn into cysts, and possibly shrink an existing cyst. Also, limiting strenuous activity may reduce the risk of cyst rupture or torsion.

      Cysts that persist beyond two or three menstrual cycles, or occur in post-menopausal women, may indicate more serious disease and should be investigated through ultrasonography and laparoscopy, especially in cases where family members have had ovarian cancer. Such cysts may require surgical biopsy. Additionally, a blood test may be taken before surgery to check for elevated CA-125, a tumor marker, which is often found in increased levels in ovarian cancer, although it can also be elevated by other conditions resulting in a large number of false positives.

      For more serious cases where cysts are large and persisting, doctors may suggest surgery. Some surgeries can be performed to successfully remove the cyst(s) without hurting the ovaries, while others may require removal of one or both ovaries.

      Most of the patients that have the ovarian cysts that come into our office don’t have much pain, so I haven’t witnessed someone getting any of these treatments, but I hope this helps, feel better!


post menopausal ovarian cyst pain