Ovarian Cyst Treatment Without Surgery

Being flat-chested sucks! That was me a year ago. I was always slim and athletic in school and my breasts were small and pointy. That was fine for me the athlete but it totally sucked for me the woman. The rest of my girlfriends all seemed 'normal' except me. I hated it when the topic of breasts came up in conversations. Most times I'd find some reason to excuse myself or if I couldn't, I'd just be quiet.

High school came and went, then came college. By that time, some of my best friends started going steady. Not me. If I were at a party, I'd attract guys' attention as much as the wallpaper would. I did fine in my studies but not socially. Bummer! My girlfriends would wear pretty revealing dresses, especially on hot dates. I was dying to get myself into one of those, but I didn't dare to. I could hardly fill an A cup. And don't even get me started on going to the beach. I'd make up excuses (had lots of practice doing that in high school) like 'I can't swim,' or 'My skin is sensitive to the salt water,' or whatever. The truth was I was ashamed to look at myself in the mirror, especially without my clothes on.

In my desperation, I started trying different ways to grow my breasts naturally. I tried some special gum that was supposed to grow them in 30 days. I spent a fortune on them over a few months but my breasts didn't grow at all. The only thing I got out of that was jaw exercise. Then I tried breast enhancement cream. They say this method of growing breasts naturally has been used for years in other civilizations but was only just starting to catch on in the US. Well, after another few months of trying, my breasts still looked and felt the same. Maybe they were a little firmer but certainly not bigger. I guess they were doing some other things in those civilizations that we don't do in the US. I was getting more and more depressed and frustrated with each passing month.

I was running out of patience and more importantly, out of money. I couldn't afford to blow another few hundred bucks of pocket money on some more crap products that promises the sky but don't deliver. I needed to find something inexpensively natural and naturally inexpensive, if you get what I mean.

Then I came across something I never thought about while surfing the Web. It was an e-book. And it was entitled, “How I Made My Breasts Grow Bigger Naturally” by Nancy Newton at www.grow-bigger-breasts-naturally.com. As I read her story in the website, I could identify with every word. It seemed as though she knew what I was going through. And for less than 30 bucks, I could also experience the same results she did. I begged my mom to let me use her credit card one last time. Thankfully, she agreed. And best of all, I could download Nancy's e-book immediately. No more waiting for the mail to deliver a product.

As I started to read through her e-book, it dawned on me for the first time that growing my breasts naturally takes more than just what I eat or do. It needed to involve how I think and feel as well. That's what was missing in most of the other products I came across before. Once I started reading, I was hooked. Needless to say, I followed Nancy's methods religiously for the next few months.

Finally, after 3 months, I started to see some positive results. My breasts started to get firmer, then a bit rounder. And at the end of the third month or so, I noticed my bra felt somewhat tighter. My breasts actually grew! I was ecstatic! I kept to the routine that Nancy recommended for another 2 months. The result was my breasts grew one entire cup size.

Today, I am no longer embarrassed over the size of my breasts. I have acquired a new-found sense of confidence and self-esteem. For perhaps the first time in my life, I feel like a woman more than I ever did before. All this is thanks to Nancy Newton's “How I Made My Breasts Grow Bigger Naturally”.

About the author:

Source: http://www.sooperarticles.com/health-fitness-articles/women-health-articles/how-made-my-breasts-grow-naturally-11373.html

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Who knows some natural cures for ovarian cysts?
    I have ovarian cyst and its size is also not small, 5.2*5.1cm.
    I just get married. I cant feel its existence at normal times. So I cant decide wether I need to remove the cyst or not. But I am planning to have a baby. So I do not want to do surgery. Is there anybody who knows some conservative treatments of ovarian cysts? Thanks a lot.

    • ANSWER:
      there is no way you can get rid of it without medical help,and it will most probably prevent you from getting pregnant anyway

  2. QUESTION:
    Natural ways of shrinking uterine fibroids and ovarian cysts?
    Today I was diagnosed with three uterine fibroids (3 cm each) and a small ovarian cyst. I don’t want to get surgery as it could be dangerous for other organs. Are there any natural ways of shrinking them?

    Thank you.

    • ANSWER:
      Fibroids are benign uterine growths. Many women have no symptoms while others experience bleeding, increased urination, bladder displacement, urine retention, constipation, infertility, miscarriage, pain during intercourse and anemia. Ovarian cysts are enlarged follicles that fail to rupture and release an egg. Women may experience general pain, disrupted periods, pain in the back and abdomen and painful intercourse. Both of these conditions are caused by imbalances in estrogen production. There are many natural treatments to deal with both of these conditions. Talk to your doctor about any natural supplements you are using.

      Herbal Treatments for Fibroids

      Herbal treatments that address bleeding often work quite quickly, but supplements that control hormone levels take about three months of use before bringing about noticeable results.

      Black cohosh controls bleeding and relieves pain; take 500 milligrams daily. Cinnamon oil has a long history of use in traditional American medicine to control bleeding fibroids. Use 10-to-15 drops every 15 minutes until the bleeding stops. Dan shen, which should only be used under professional supervision, treats congealed blood, dark red clots during menstruation, and relieves pelvic congestion. Reishi tincture alleviates pelvic inflammation. Take one tablespoon in ¼ cup of water three times daily.

      There are three traditional Chinese formulas that are commonly used to treat uterine fibroids. Take as directed on the product label.

      Augmented Rambling powder lowers estrogen levels and is most useful for women who are also suffering from painful or difficult urination. Cinnamon Twig and Poria Pill lowers estrogen levels without interfering with the menstrual cycle or causing weight gain. Four Substance Decoction treats fibroids and is especially useful for women who eat a poor diet.
      Herbal Treatments for Ovarian Cysts

      Dioscorea tincture, also known as wild yam, alleviates cramping caused by ovarian cysts. Take as directed on the label. Dong quai relieves pain resulting from this condition. Take 1,000 milligrams daily during the two-week period after menstruation and then discontinue for two weeks.

      There are several Chinese formulas used to treat ovarian cysts. Use as directed on the product label.

      Dong Quai and Peony Powder reduces estrogen levels and the formation of inflammatory substances in the tissues that line the uterus. Two Cured Decoction reduces estrogen levels. Augmented Rambling Powder and Cinnamon Twig and Poria pill, which are listed above, can also be used for ovarian cysts

      Estrogen is produced from body fat. Excess weight increases the amount of estrogen in the body, so make an effort to maintain a normal weight. Do your best to exercise regularly and reduce stress levels. Avoid the following herbs that stimulate estrogen production: Coleus, Cordyceps, fennel seed, licorice, and moutan.
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  3. QUESTION:
    How young is too young for a hysterectomy and oophorectomy?
    I’m 27 with 2 kids I was told I’d never have. I have endometriosis and recurring ovarian cysts and adhesions. I’ve had 7 surgeries (6 laparoscopies and 1 laparotomy) in the last 10 years and I’m going to have another one in less than 2 weeks. DH and I were hoping to try for a 3rd baby later this year but with the pain I’m in I’m almost ready to throw in the towel. Is it too soon to give up? BTW – my mom was only 23 when she HAD to have a hysterectomy.

    • ANSWER:
      There’s never a ‘right age’ for a hysterectomy. There are extensive potential long-term risks involved in early surgical menopause. However, often, the reason or basis for the hysterectomy outweighs the potential risks. However, Endometriosis is not one of those reasons.

      Endometriosis is absolutely not cured by hysterectomy and it needs no HRT to continue thriving following removal of the uterus/ovaries. Endo implants themselves produce their own estrogen-synthesizing enzyme, known as aromatase, and therefore, any disease left behind during the hysterectomy will continue to cause symptoms.

      The key to living well with Endo is to remove disease, not healthy organs. Before going into this next surgery, take time to learn about excision surgery. See the following websites:

      http://www.centerforendo.com

      http://www.endometriosistreatment.org

      http://www.endoexcision.com

      Hysterectomy has a role in Endometriosis treatment, particularly in advanced stages in those who also have adenomyosis. However, it is not a valid treatment to simply remove the uterus and ovaries without removing all the disease left behind.

      Good luck to you.

  4. QUESTION:
    What are the risks of having a cyst on your ovary? Should I have surgery?
    I am 28, had an ultrasound last Wednesday, the tech said that she found a cyst on my right ovary. I didn’t get really scared until I got home and researched on the net. Just need some advice. Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      If it is a functional cyst, these usually disappear within 60 days without treatment and are relatively common. Since functional ovarian cysts typically go away without treatment within 1 to 2 menstrual cycles, your dr may recommend a period of observation without treatment to see whether your ovarian cyst gets better or goes away on its own. Your dr will do another pelvic exam in 1 to 2 months to see whether the cyst has changed in size. If the cyst comes and goes, your doctor may prescribe birth control pills. These will reduce the hormones that promote growth and prevent formation of large cysts. If the cyst doesn’t go away, then your doctor may want to surgically remove it. If it causes severe pain, then your doctor would have it surgically removed without trying birth control pills.

  5. QUESTION:
    What are the signs and symptoms of endometriosis?
    What are the side effects without treatment, and what is the treatment, and how do they diagnose it. Does it always affect fertility.

    • ANSWER:
      From the Endo Research Center (www.endocenter.org):

      “About Endometriosis:

      With Endometriosis, tissue like that which lines the uterus (the endometrium) is found outside the womb in other areas of the body. Normally, the endometrium is shed each month through menses; however, with Endometriosis, these implants have no way of leaving the body. The implants still break down and bleed, but result is far different than in women and girls without the disease: internal bleeding, degeneration of blood and tissue shed from the growths, inflammation of the surrounding areas, and formation of scar tissue result. In addition, depending on the location of the growths, interference with the normal function of the bowel, bladder, intestines and other areas of the pelvic cavity can occur. Endometriosis has also been found lodged in the skin – and even the brain.

      Symptoms include chronic or intermittent pelvic pain, dysmenorrhea (painful menstruation is not normal!), infertility, miscarriage(s), ectopic (tubal) pregnancy, dyspareunia (pain associated with intercourse), nausea / vomiting / abdominal cramping, diarrhea / constipation (particularly with menses), painful bowel movements, painful or burning urination, urinary frequency, retention, or urgency; fatigue, chronic pain, allergies and immune system-related illnesses are also commonly reported complaints of women who have Endo. It is quite possible to have some, all, or none of these symptoms. Endo symptoms are varied and often nonspecific, so they can easily masquerade as several other conditions, including adenomyosis (“Endometriosis Interna”), appendicitis, ovarian cysts, bowel obstructions, colon cancer, diverticulitis, ectopic pregnancy, fibroid tumors, gonorrhea, inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome, ovarian cancer, and PID.

      Despite today’s age of medical advances, researchers remain unsure as what causes of Endometriosis. There is NO CURE, despite the continued propagation of such myths by the uninformed who still mistakenly believe that hysterectomy, pregnancy and/or menopause can “cure” the disease. Invasive surgery remains the gold standard of diagnosis, and current therapies continue to remain extremely limited, often carrying side effects.

      Mistakenly minimized as “painful periods,” Endometriosis is more than just “killer cramps.” It is a leading cause of female infertility, chronic pelvic pain and gynecologic surgery, and accounts for more than half of the 500,000 hysterectomies performed in the US annually. Despite being more prevalent than breast cancer, Endometriosis continues to be treated as an insignificant ailment. Recent studies have even shown an elevated risk of certain cancers and other serious illnesses in those with the disease, as well as malignant changes within the disease itself.

      Research has shown that genetics, immune system dysfunction, and exposure to environmental toxins like Dioxin may all be contributing factors to the development of the disease. Endometriosis knows no racial or socioeconomic barriers, and can affect women ranging from adolescence to post-menopause. The disease can be so painful as to render a woman or teen unable to care for herself or her family, attend work, school, or social functions, or go about her normal routine. It can negatively affect every aspect of a woman’s life; from her self-esteem and relationships, to her capacity to bear children, to her ability to be a contributing member of society.

      The disease can currently only be diagnosed through invasive surgery, and the average delay in diagnosis is a staggering 9 years. A patient may seek the counsel of 5 or more physicians before her pain is adequately addressed.

      Once diagnosed, it is not unusual for a patient to undergo several pelvic surgeries and embark on many different hormonal and medical therapies in an attempt to treat her symptoms. None of the current treatments are entirely effective, and virtually all synthetic therapies carry significantly negative side effects; some lasting far beyond cessation of therapy. The exception to this is excision; see www.centerforendo.com to learn more about excision as the leading treatment.

      Though Endometriosis is one of the most prevalent illnesses affecting society today, awareness is sorely lacking and disease research continues to remain significantly under funded. For instance, in fiscal year 2000, the National Institutes of Health planned to spend .5 billion on research. Of that funding, only .7 million was earmarked for Endometriosis – amounting to approximately $.40/patient. This is in stark contrast to other illnesses such as Alzheimer’s and Lupus, which received approximately 5.00 and .00 per patient, respectively. American businesses lose millions of dollars each year in lost productivity and work time because of Endometriosis. The cost of surgery required to diagnose the disease in each patient alone adds greatly to the financial burden of both consumers and companies alike.

      Once erroneously believed to be a disease of “Caucasian career women who have delayed childbearing,” we know that in fact, Endometriosis affects women of all ages, races and
      socioeconomic status. Endometriosis also can and does exist in the adolescent female population. Far from the “rare” incidence once believed, studies have found that as many as 70% of teenagers with chronic pelvic pain had Endometriosis proven by laparoscopy. Other reports indicate that as many as 41% of patients experienced Endometriosis pain as an adolescent. The illness can be quite disruptive and cause significant dysfunction, especially at a time in life when self-esteem, school attendance and performance, and social involvement are all critical. Many adolescents with Endometriosis find themselves unable to attend or participate in classes, social functions, extracurricular activities, and sports due to significant pain and other symptoms of Endometriosis. Sometimes, teens and young women lack support and validation from both the home and the school; told the pain is “in their head,” that they are “faking it,” that their debilitating cramps are “normal” and “a part of womanhood,” that they are merely suffering from “the curse,” or that they should just “grin and bear it.” Their symptoms may also be dismissed as a sexually transmitted disease, which Endometriosis absolutely is not. Failure to acknowledge and address symptoms early in the disease process can lead to significant delays in diagnosis and necessary, subsequent treatments. Lack of support from family and loved ones can also add to the patient’s pain and fear – at any age.

      Recent studies have also shown that Endometriosis may in fact have an even bigger impact on younger patients than older women. One such study discovered that in patients under 22 years of age, the rate of disease recurrence was
      double that of older women (35% versus 19%). The study also revealed that the disease behaves differently in
      younger women; leading some researchers to believe it is a
      different form of Endometriosis altogether. Surgery, considered necessary to accurately diagnose and
      effectively treat the disease, is often withheld from younger patients based on the injudicious belief that early surgery somehow negatively influences a young woman’s fertility. Extensive, cumulative research has shown this concern to be unfounded. What can impact fertility, however,
      is neglecting effective treatment of the disease. Some
      researchers also feel that symptomatic, adolescent-onset
      Endometriosis is most often a lifelong problem that will
      progress to severe fibrotic disease.

      While it is possible to become pregnant with Endometriosis, the key is to obtain early, effective treatment such as that offered by specialty treatment centers like the Center for Endo Care (see www.centerforendo.com to learn about the success of excision as treatment). Hysterectomy is not a cure for Endometriosis. Any disease left behind by the surgeon (whether by design because he or she ‘couldn’t get it all’ or accident because they don’t recognize the disease in all manifestations) will continue to thrive and cause pain and symptoms. It does not matter if the ovaries are removed or if HRT is withheld; Endo produces its own estrogen-synthesizing enzyme known as aromatase. Thus, it enables it’s own vicious life cycle and sustains the disease process. You would be better off getting all disease truly excised from all locations at a specialty center like the CEC (www.centerforendo.com).

      Due in part to the efforts of foundations like the ERC, research is ongoing in some places as to the causes of Endometriosis and potential cures for the disease. Our organization will continue to push for more widespread research into the many facets of the disease, and ultimately, a cure.

      For more information:

      http://www.endocenter.org/

      Endo Self Test:

      Not sure if you have Endometriosis? While pelvic surgery is the only current way to definitively diagnose it, symptoms can lead you and your doctor to suspect the disease. Review the following and consider if any of these common symptoms apply to you. Review your answers with your gynecologist for further discussion.

      Do you experience so much pain during or around your period that you find yourself unable to work, attend school or social functions, or go about your normal routine? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you have any relatives diagnosed with Endometriosis? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you find yourself with painful abdominal bloating, swelling or tenderness at any time in your cycle? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you have a history of painful ovarian Endometriomas (“chocolate cysts”)? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you have a history of miscarriage, infertility or ectopic pregnancy? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you experience gastrointestinal symptoms during your cycle, such as nausea or vomiting and/or painful abdominal cramping accompanied by diarrhea and/or constipation? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you have a history of fatigue and/or a lowered immunity (i.e., “sick and tired” all the time)? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you have a history of allergies, which tend to worsen around your periods? _____YES / _____ NO

      If sexually active, do you experience pain during sexual activity? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you suffer from autoimmune diseases or other conditions (i.e., thyroid disease, rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, fibromyalgia, multiple sclerosis, chronic migraines)? _____YES / _____ NO

      Have you ever undergone pelvic surgery like a laparoscopy, in which Endometriosis was suspected but not definitively diagnosed?
      _____YES / _____ NO

      If you have answered “yes” to one or more of these questions, you may have Endometriosis. Talk to your doctor about getting an accurate diagnosis and effective treatment today. Dull aching and cramping can occur during menstruation in many women and teens, due to uterine contractions and the release of various hormones including those known as prostaglandins. However, period pain that becomes so debilitating it renders you unable to go about your normal routine is not ordinary or typical! Pain is your body’s way of signaling that something is WRONG. If you are suffering from pelvic pain at any point in your cycle, an Endometriosis diagnosis should be considered.

      Know the Facts:

      - Endometriosis can affect women and teens of all ages, even those as young as 10 or as old as 85!
      - Hysterectomy, menopause and pregnancy are NOT cures for Endometriosis; in fact, there is no definitive cure!
      - Delayed childbearing is NOT what causes Endometriosis; in fact, no one really knows for sure what causes the disease, but research points to multi-factorial origins like heredity, immunology and exposure to environmental toxicants!
      - Endometriosis can only be accurately diagnosed via surgery; diagnostic tests like MRIs and ultrasounds are not definitive!
      - GnRH therapies like Lupron should never be administered in those patients younger than 18 yrs. of age or before a surgical diagnosis!
      - You CAN live well in spite of Endometriosis. WE ARE HERE TO HELP!” ~ www.endocenter.org

  6. QUESTION:
    What are treatments of ovarian cyst?
    I heard that ovarian cyst is a common disease. Bur if we leave it on its own, it will possibly worsen.
    So who knows some good ways to treat ovarian cyst, no surgery. What are treatments of ovarian cyst?

    • ANSWER:
      When it comes to the treatments of ovarian cyst, doctors always choose surgery first. Why?
      Because if the cyst is removed through operation, it will never recur. It is a good choice in deed.

      But some patients do not want to do surgery or the cyst is too small no need to do surgery.
      It is over treating to do surgery. So then what should we do?
      I think most patients would prefer to take some drugs to treat ovarian cyst. If their ovarian cyst can recover without taking any drugs, I think it is what they are looking for:

      Chinese conservative choice for treatment of ovarian cyst is Moxa Attach Cyst Plaster.
      They use a plaster to treat ovarian cyst and no need to take drugs orally and no operation.
      If you are also interested, please go to, http://nobleherb.com/goods-15.html

      Many of my friends had used this magic Moxa Attach Cyst Plaster. They told me its effect is good, so I recommend it to you.
      Wish it also bring luck to you.
      Good luck.

  7. QUESTION:
    Do ovarian cysts usually need to be surgically removed?
    I was told today after getting MRI results that I need to see an oncologist. I always thought that most ovarian cysts and fibroids are not cancer. I have no symptoms, no pain, no bleeding.
    Do you think I’ll have to have that godd-awful test called a ‘Hysterosonography?’
    the report mentioned that I should go for a transvaginal sonogram for more information.

    • ANSWER:
      Typically, ovarian cysts are functional (not disease or cancer related) and occur as a normal process of ovulation. During the days before ovulation, a follicle grows. But at the time of expected ovulation, the follicle fails to break open and release an egg, as it is supposed to. Instead, the fluid within the follicle remains and forms a cyst.

      Functional, or physiological, ovarian cysts usually disappear within 8-12 weeks without treatment. They are relatively common, and are more common during a woman’s childbearing years (puberty to menopause). Ovarian cysts are rare after menopause.

      Functional ovarian cysts are not the same as ovarian tumors (including ovarian cancer) or cysts due to hormone-related conditions such as polycystic ovarian disease. Some non-functional ovarian cysts must be treated to go away.

      An ovarian cyst can cause pain if it pushes on nearby structures, ruptures or bleeds. Pain may also occur if the cyst is twisted or causes twisting (torsion) of the fallopian tube.

      Symptoms of ovarian cysts can include:

      * Pelvic pain – constant, dull aching
      * Pain with intercourse or pelvic pain during movement
      * Pain during bowel movements
      * Pelvic pain shortly after beginning or ending a menstrual period
      * Abnormal uterine bleeding (change from normal menstrual pattern)
      * Longer than usual menstrual cycle
      * Shorter than usual menstrual cycle
      * Absent menstruation
      * Irregular menstruation
      * Abdominal bloating or swelling

      Often no symptoms are noted and ovarian cysts are found only be routine examinations. Usually birth control pills may be prescribed to help establish normal cycles and decrease the development of functional ovarian cysts.

      Simple ovarian cysts that are larger than 5-10 centimetres and complex ovarian cysts that persist should and will usually be surgically removed via laparoscopy (minimal invasive surgery).

      I would recommend that you discuss all the details such as the type of cyst, size of cyst etc with your doctor/gyno and ask them to answer any questions or concerns you may have.

      I have suffered from many bilateral ovarian cysts over the past 10 years and have had to have surgery 2 times to the cysts removed (it wasn’t anything too serious).

      I hope this helps to answer your question. Good luck :)

  8. QUESTION:
    How to treat an ovarian cyst?
    I just found out I have a little ovarian cyst. I’ve already been in pain for two weeks. I can’t take anymore. What’s gonna happen?? Supposebly they go away on their own, how long till it goes awayy? Help

    • ANSWER:
      Hi,
      You can’t depend on symptoms alone to tell you if you have an ovarian cyst. In fact, you’ll likely have no symptoms at all. Or if you do, the symptoms may be similar to those of other conditions, such as endometriosis, pelvic inflammatory disease, ectopic pregnancy or ovarian cancer. Even appendicitis and diverticulitis can produce signs and symptoms that mimic a ruptured ovarian cyst.

      Still, it’s important to be watchful of any symptoms or changes in your body and to know which symptoms are serious. If you have an ovarian cyst, you may experience one or more of the following signs and symptoms:

      ■Menstrual irregularities
      ■Pelvic pain — a constant or intermittent dull ache that may radiate to your lower back and thighs
      ■Pelvic pain shortly before your period begins or just before it ends
      ■Pelvic pain during intercourse (dyspareunia)
      ■Pain during bowel movements or pressure on your bowels
      ■Nausea, vomiting or breast tenderness similar to that experienced during pregnancy
      ■Fullness or heaviness in your abdomen
      ■Pressure on your rectum or bladder — difficulty emptying your bladder completely
      When to see a doctor
      Seek immediate medical attention if you have:

      ■Sudden, severe abdominal or pelvic pain
      ■Pain accompanied by fever or vomiting
      These signs and symptoms — or those of shock, such as cold, clammy skin, rapid breathing, and lightheadedness or weakness — indicate an emergency and mean that you need to see a doctor right away.
      Treatment depends on your age, the type and size of your cyst, and your symptoms. Your doctor may suggest:

      ■Watchful waiting. You can wait and be re-examined in one to three months if you’re in your reproductive years, you have no symptoms and an ultrasound shows you have a simple, fluid-filled cyst. Your doctor will likely recommend that you get follow-up pelvic ultrasounds at periodic intervals to see if your cyst has changed in size.

      Watchful waiting, including regular monitoring with ultrasound, is also a common treatment option recommended for postmenopausal women if a cyst is filled with fluid and is less than 2 centimeters in diameter.

      ■Birth control pills. Your doctor may recommend birth control pills to reduce the chance of new cysts developing in future menstrual cycles. Oral contraceptives offer the added benefit of significantly reducing your risk of ovarian cancer — the risk decreases the longer you take birth control pills.
      ■Surgery. Your doctor may suggest removal of a cyst if it is large, doesn’t look like a functional cyst, is growing or persists through two or three menstrual cycles. Cysts that cause pain or other symptoms may be removed.

      Some cysts can be removed without removing the ovary in a procedure known as a cystectomy. Your doctor may also suggest removing the affected ovary and leaving the other intact in a procedure known as oophorectomy. Both procedures may allow you to maintain your fertility if you’re still in your childbearing years. Leaving at least one ovary intact also has the benefit of maintaining a source of estrogen production.

      If a cystic mass is cancerous, however, your doctor will advise a hysterectomy to remove both ovaries and your uterus. After menopause, the risk of a newly found cystic ovarian mass being cancerous increases. As a result, doctors more commonly recommend surgery when a cystic mass develops on the ovaries after menopause.

  9. QUESTION:
    Can exercise rupture an ovarian cyst?
    I got an ultrasound done today and the lab tech saw a cyst on my left ovary that appears to be twice the size of my uterus. Would it be dangerous to exercise? I need to start loosing weight and I plan on using the new Wii Fit that uses hula hooping and abdominal twists.

    • ANSWER:
      OVARIAN CYSTS

      About Your Diagnosis

      Ovarian cysts are fluid filled structures that develop in the ovary. Ovarian cysts develop with every menstrual cycle. Fluid collects around developing eggs; one egg becomes “dominant” and that egg ovulates (leaves the ovary and goes into the fallopian tube). The ovulated egg leaves a cyst behind in the ovary. This cyst is usually 2—3 centimeters (1—2 inches) in diameter. This type of cyst is called a “physiologic cyst,” “follicular cyst,” or “simple cyst.” If the cyst remains a normal size, it does not cause any symptoms. If the cyst grows larger, 4 centimeters or larger, it can cause pain. Symptomatic cysts are very common; in most cases, the cyst and symptoms will resolve without any treatment.

      Occasionally, cysts can bleed into themselves. A very small blood vessel in the wall of the cyst breaks, and the blood goes into the cyst. These are called “hemorrhagic cysts” and sometimes are more painful. Hemorrhagic cysts are common as well. Occasionally, hemorrhagic cysts can rupture, and the blood goes into the abdominal cavity. No blood is seen out of the vagina. If a cyst ruptures, it is usually very painful. Hemorrhagic cysts that rupture are less common. Most hemorrhagic cysts are self-limiting; some need surgical intervention (see below). Even if the hemorrhagic cyst ruptures, in many cases it will resolve without surgery. Sometimes surgery is necessary.
      READ MORE..

      http://apma-nc.com/PatientEducation/ovarian_cysts.htm

  10. QUESTION:
    How long will the pain last?
    I have a Hemorrhagic Ovarian Cyst and I have been in extreme pain for a week. The pain medication my Doctors prescribed barely takes the edge off the pain. I am thinking about surgery, but I’m afraid that it will affect my chances of being able to conceive. I looked on web md for information on how long symptoms last, but haven’t been able to find any information.

    • ANSWER:
      It’s very difficult to predict just how long the pain will last with ovarian cysts. There are many factors that influence the pain: the location of the cyst (if it’s pressing on a nerve etc.), the size of the cyst and whether it has burst or is still growing. If your doctor is suggesting surgery I would seriously consider this option as Hemorrhagic cysts are almost always require surgery. The procedure is called a laparoscopy and is very minimally invasive and should in no way affect your ability to conceive in the future. In truth a laparoscopy may help the doctor determine if there are any other issues relating to the formation of cysts (endometriosis, Pelvic inflammatory disease..) The more information your dr has the better he will be able to treat your symptoms as well as provide you with other treatment options if needed. I personally have undergone 3 laparoscopies for the removal of endometrial tissue within my pelvic cavity as well as several cysts. After each surgery I would have a significant improvement in my pain level. I had many ultrasounds done prior to my surgeries but it was only once the surgeon was inside that they determined I had significant scarring, cysts and a bicornuate uterus (in the shape of a heart with a septum dividing the cavity into 2 sections). Without surgery I would have never known this. Good luck with everything and I hope things go well. Please go back to your Dr if the pain medication is not working he may need to increase the dose or switch you to another medication. Myself I have found that a combination of an NSAID and a narcotic analgesic works best (ie, Ibuprophen and Demerol or hydrocodone)`

  11. QUESTION:
    After having clamps removed and tubes opened. I start Clomid soon. one tube is blocked. Can i get pregnant.?
    I already have 3 children but with a new husband we want more children. I had surgery to remove clamps. One tube is blocked and I have tried to get pregnant. The next step is Clomid. Any ideas.

    • ANSWER:
      Hi there,
      Can I ask you a couple of questions?
      I don’t know much about clomid, but have read alot of success story, and also alot of side affect storys, I guess you have to weight up the benifets

      When did you have tubal reversal?
      Asking because in booked in in two mths, both my tubes are fine, but just wwondering.
      tina_kel@yahoo.com.

      Clomiphene citrate (CC, Clomid, Serophene) is often the first fertility drug that couples come in contact with. It is (relatively) inexpensive as fertility drugs go, it is easily taken (orally rather than by injection) and it is the first line drug used for ovulation induction in patients with PCOS and other ovulatory disorders.

      It has been used for patients with luteal phase defect. It can also be used to assess ovarian reserve or, in other words, the likelihood that a woman’s ovaries can still produce viable eggs.

      Clomid is not useful for women whose ovaries have reached the end of their working life.

      How does it work?

      Clomid is actually quite a potent and somewhat complicated medication. It is capable of reacting with all of the tissues in the body that have estrogen receptors.

      These tissues include hypothalamus, pituitary, ovary, endometrium, vagina, and cervix.

      Clomid influences the way that the four hormones required for ovulation, GnRH, FSH, LH and estradiol, relate and interrelate.

      While we do not completely understand the mechanisms by which this drug works, in essence it appears that Clomid fools the body into believing that the estrogen level is low.

      This altered feedback information causes the hypothalamus (an area of the brain) to make and release more gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) which in turn causes the pituitary to make and release more FSH and LH.

      More follicle stimulating hormone and more luteinizing hormone should result in the release of one or more mature eggs – ovulation.

      How is it taken?

      When used for ovulation induction, Clomid is taken orally for approximately five days early in the menstrual cycle.

      Depending upon your clinic protocol this may start as early as day 3 or as late as day 5. It is important to remember that the first day of the menstrual cycle is the first day of normal bleeding, not spotting.

      Most women begin with an initial dose of one tablet (50 mg.) per day.

      This dose may be increased by your physician in subsequent cycles if pregnancy does not occur.

      Once ovulating, most pregnancies occur in the first 6 cycles of treatment.

      Clomid is said to be able to induce ovulation in as much as 85% of the women who use it, though only half of those will actually become pregnant.

      Most authorities agree that continuing for more than 6 ovulatory cycles in not likely to increase the chances of success.

      At many clinics a pelvic examination or ultrasound is done each cycle shortly before starting on CC in order to determine if there are any ovarian or uterine abnormalities.

      Approximately 5% of women using Clomid will develop an ovarian cyst at some time during their treatment period.

      These cysts are benign and will usually resolve spontaneously without any treatment, but may cause discomfort.

      If you are using Clomid and do not have a menstrual period by cycle day 35, you may have failed to ovulate or you may be pregnant! In either event you need to schedule a visit to your doctor to ascertain what is happening.

      If you are not pregnant, your doctor may prescribe other medications to help bring on your period.

      Extended luteal phases (late periods, long cycles) are not uncommon on Clomid.

      What are the side effects of Clomiphene?

      Twin pregnancies may occur in as many as 5% of the women who use Clomid.

      Triplet pregnancies are far more rare. Other reported adverse effects include ovarian enlargement 13.6%,

      Vasomotor Flushes 10.4%,

      abdominal or pelvic discomfort, distention or bloating 5.5%, nausea and vomiting 2.2%,
      breast discomfort 2.1%, visual symptoms (blurred vision, lights, floaters, waves, unspecified visual complaints, photophobia, diplopia, scotoma, etc.)

      1.5%, headache 1.3% and abnormal uterine bleeding (intermenstrual spotting, menorrhagia)1.3%.

      Although there has been much talk about the relationship of clomiphene (and other fertility drugs) to ovarian cancer the vast majority of the evidence now seems to point at infertility itself, rather than the use of fertility drugs as being the primary explanation for the slightly increased incidence of reproductive cancers in the infertility population. (See recent discussion on our boards.)

      Clomid has been used to induce ovulation for more that thirty years.

      There is not any evidence that it causes an increase in congenital abnormalities or birth defects in children.

      It is not associated with an increase in premature labor or in other complications of pregnancy.

      What if only one tube is blocked?

      One normal tube is sufficient to allow a pregnancy – and most surgeons would not advise tubal surgery for these patients.

      Obviously, the chances of pregnancy for such patients is half that of normal women and therefore establishing a pregnancy may take twice as long.

      The danger of trying to surgically repair a single blocked tube is that adhesions because of the surgery may cause both the tubes to become blocked !

      good luck…

  12. QUESTION:
    How do I know if I have an Ovarian Cyst or if i’m Pregnant?
    Is there anyway to know if I have an Ovarian Cyst or if i’m Pregnant without going to a doctor?

    Can I have any ides? I’ve just found out that they have the same symptoms….
    ideas* sorry type
    I also did some research, and I may even have an Ectopic Pregnancy?

    • ANSWER:
      Typically, ovarian cysts are functional (not disease or cancer related) and occur as a normal process of ovulation. During the days before ovulation, a follicle grows. But at the time of expected ovulation, the follicle fails to break open and release an egg, as it is supposed to. Instead, the fluid within the follicle remains and forms a cyst.

      Functional, or physiological, ovarian cysts usually disappear within 8-12 weeks without treatment. They are relatively common, and are more common during a woman’s childbearing years (puberty to menopause). Ovarian cysts are rare after menopause.

      Functional ovarian cysts are not the same as ovarian tumors (including ovarian cancer) or cysts due to hormone-related conditions such as polycystic ovarian disease. Some non-functional ovarian cysts must be treated to go away.

      An ovarian cyst can cause pain if it pushes on nearby structures, ruptures or bleeds. Pain may also occur if the cyst is twisted or causes twisting (torsion) of the fallopian tube.

      Symptoms of ovarian cysts can include:

      * Pelvic pain – constant, dull aching
      * Pain with intercourse or pelvic pain during movement
      * Pain during bowel movements
      * Pelvic pain shortly after beginning or ending a menstrual period
      * Abnormal uterine bleeding (change from normal menstrual pattern)
      * Longer than usual menstrual cycle
      * Shorter than usual menstrual cycle
      * Absent menstruation
      * Irregular menstruation
      * Abdominal bloating or swelling

      Often no symptoms are noted and ovarian cysts are found only be routine examinations. Usually birth control pills may be prescribed to help establish normal cycles and decrease the development of functional ovarian cysts.

      Simple ovarian cysts that are larger than 5-10 centimetres and complex ovarian cysts that persist should and will usually be surgically removed via laparoscopy (minimal invasive surgery).

      I would recommend that if you think you have an ovarian cyst that you consult with your doctor/gyno about this and ask them to answer any questions or concerns you may have.

      I have suffered from many bilateral ovarian cysts over the past 11 years and have surgery 2 times to have them removed (it wasn’t anything too serious).

      I hope this helps to answer your question. Good luck :)

  13. QUESTION:
    What treatment is given for ovarian cysts that come and go?
    I have a cyst on my remaing ovary,but my Gyn said they leak out and they aren’t worth removing an ovary over. 3 yrs later,I can barely stand to stit without feeling like I’m gonna pee myself!! Why can’t they remove this ovary which I wanted!!!

    • ANSWER:
      While 95% of all cysts are benign, the current treatment is a wait and see approach. 44% of cysts will resolve on their own. They should be checked with ultrasound at various intervals. For those that don’t resolve on their own, surgery is usually required

  14. QUESTION:
    I was diagnosed with an ovarian cyst last week?
    I have been in pain for months and have my first appointment with a gynecologist tomorrow. How long do you think it will take them to fix me and for me to be out of pain? It has been 5 months already.

    • ANSWER:
      The GYN will want to do some tests to determine the size and growth rate. Basic tests to expect would be a regular ultrasound, trans-vaginal ultrasound and most likely a CT scan of abdomen/pelvis. Once it is known how large it is, then treatment options will be discussed.

      I had what was thought to be an ovarian cyst last April. The CT scan and ultrasounds confirmed a 4 cm mass on right ovary. When I followed up with my GYN, he explained that most women will have cysts from time to time and that, for many women they’ll come and go without causing problems. Cysts 3 cm and under are generally not cause for concern, but cysts 5 cm and over need to be checked out. Because mine fell right in the middle, my treatment options were to wait a month and have a repeat ultrasound to check for growth or schedule a laparoscopy in order to get a visual on it and if possible determine what was causing it. Because I had a history of endometriosis as well, I elected to have the surgery to make sure. And my ovarian cyst actually turned out to be a fibroid tumor within my ovary so I’m glad that I did not wait.

      Again, depending upon its size and the amount of pain you are experiencing, the doc may advise the wait & see approach, put you on medication or advise the laparoscopy. Should the surgery be the option recommended, know that you are going to be really uncomfortable for about a week, then it will taper off. It helps to have someone around who can help you with any heavy lifting and standing or sitting and getting into and out of bed during that time so that you do not hurt or frustrate yourself trying to do it all. Follow any activity restrictions you are given to the letter.

      Good luck to you dear.

  15. QUESTION:
    will i become fat or gain weight even if i take treatment?
    i’m 17 years old and have a single cyst (48mm) in the right ovary. will i gain weight, will it lead to obesity? i just came to know that i have a cyst a couple of days ago, n i haven’t put on weight and have always been skinny (even today). will i gain weight even if i’m in the process of taking treatment?

    • ANSWER:
      Not if you just have one single cyst. Many women have them and many cysts are discovered by chance having given no problems. Often they resolve without treatment.
      If you do experience discomfort your doctor will problably advise surgery.
      If you’re having periods, only mild symptoms, you probably won’t need to have surgery. If the cyst doesn’t go away after several menstrual periods, if it gets larger or if it doesn’t look like a functional cyst on a sonogram, your doctor may want you to have an operation to remove it. There are many different types of ovarian cysts in women of childbearing age that do require surgery. Fortunately, cysts in women of this age are almost always benign

      Functional ovarian cysts (the most common type). These are harmless cysts that are short-lived and formed as part of the menstrual cycle.

  16. QUESTION:
    Just been diagnosed with an ovarian cyst please help?
    So I have just been diagnosed with an ovarian cyst and doc says I should start to feel better in a few days about a week ago. The pain feels like its getting worse and worse and they said it was already quite large when I was diagnosed. What should I do?? I was wondering if they could drain it or remove it somehow???

    • ANSWER:
      For 3 years running I had pain in my lower abdomen. Went to the doctors the first year and he told me that I had a cyst on my ovary. Pain was excruciating and the only way was surgery. Had the operation and found out that my right ovary had adhered itself to my uterus and had a cyst in it. Fixed it up and then same time the following two years the same thing happened. Doctor finally fixed it after the 3rd time. No problems since.

      Without treatment (surgery) I don’t know how the cyst would disappear. I’m not a doctor though but I was not told of any other way of getting rid of it except surgery.

      Hope all goes well with you whichever treatment you go with.

  17. QUESTION:
    What Is Ovarian Cyst And how Can You Cure It?
    Can Ovarian Cyst be cured naturally?

    • ANSWER:
      Typically, ovarian cysts are functional (not disease or cancer related) and occur as a normal process of ovulation. During the days before ovulation, a follicle grows. But at the time of expected ovulation, the follicle fails to break open and release an egg, as it is supposed to. Instead, the fluid within the follicle remains and forms a cyst.

      Functional, or physiological, ovarian cysts usually disappear within 8-12 weeks without treatment. They are relatively common, and are more common during a woman’s childbearing years (puberty to menopause). Ovarian cysts are rare after menopause.

      Functional ovarian cysts are not the same as ovarian tumors (including ovarian cancer) or cysts due to hormone-related conditions such as polycystic ovarian disease. Some non-functional ovarian cysts must be treated to go away.

      An ovarian cyst can cause pain if it pushes on nearby structures, ruptures or bleeds. Pain may also occur if the cyst is twisted or causes twisting (torsion) of the fallopian tube.

      Symptoms of ovarian cysts can include:

      * Pelvic pain – constant, dull aching
      * Pain with intercourse or pelvic pain during movement
      * Pain during bowel movements
      * Pelvic pain shortly after beginning or ending a menstrual period
      * Abnormal uterine bleeding (change from normal menstrual pattern)
      * Longer than usual menstrual cycle
      * Shorter than usual menstrual cycle
      * Absent menstruation
      * Irregular menstruation
      * Abdominal bloating or swelling

      Often no symptoms are noted and ovarian cysts are found only be routine examinations. Usually birth control pills may be prescribed to help establish normal cycles and decrease the development of functional ovarian cysts.

      Simple ovarian cysts that are larger than 5-10 centimetres and complex ovarian cysts that persist should and will usually be surgically removed via laparoscopy (minimal invasive surgery).

      I would recommend that if you think you have an ovarian cyst that you consult with your doctor/gyno about this and ask them to answer any questions or concerns you may have.

      I have suffered from many bilateral ovarian cysts over the past 11 years and have surgery 2 times to have them removed (it wasn’t anything too serious).

      I hope this helps to answer your question. Good luck :)

  18. QUESTION:
    What exactly is an ovarian cyst?
    and what causes them? are they easy to get rid of?
    do guys get cysts any where on their body?

    • ANSWER:
      Typically, ovarian cysts are functional (not disease or cancer related) and occur as a normal process of ovulation. During the days before ovulation, a follicle grows. But at the time of expected ovulation, the follicle fails to break open and release an egg, as it is supposed to. Instead, the fluid within the follicle remains and forms a cyst.

      Functional, or physiological, ovarian cysts usually disappear within 8-12 weeks without treatment. They are relatively common, and are more common during a woman’s childbearing years (puberty to menopause). Ovarian cysts are rare after menopause.

      Functional ovarian cysts are not the same as ovarian tumors (including ovarian cancer) or cysts due to hormone-related conditions such as polycystic ovarian disease. Some non-functional ovarian cysts must be treated to go away.

      An ovarian cyst can cause pain if it pushes on nearby structures, ruptures or bleeds. Pain may also occur if the cyst is twisted or causes twisting (torsion) of the fallopian tube.

      Symptoms of ovarian cysts can include:

      * Pelvic pain – constant, dull aching
      * Pain with intercourse or pelvic pain during movement
      * Pain during bowel movements
      * Pelvic pain shortly after beginning or ending a menstrual period
      * Abnormal uterine bleeding (change from normal menstrual pattern)
      * Longer than usual menstrual cycle
      * Shorter than usual menstrual cycle
      * Absent menstruation
      * Irregular menstruation
      * Abdominal bloating or swelling

      Often no symptoms are noted and ovarian cysts are found only be routine examinations. Usually birth control pills may be prescribed to help establish normal cycles and decrease the development of functional ovarian cysts.

      Simple ovarian cysts that are larger than 5-10 centimetres and complex ovarian cysts that persist should and will usually be surgically removed via laparoscopy (minimal invasive surgery).

      I would recommend that if you think you have an ovarian cyst that you consult with your doctor/gyno about this and ask them to answer any questions or concerns you may have.

      I have suffered from many bilateral ovarian cysts over the past 10 years and have surgery 2 times to have them removed (it wasn’t anything too serious).

      I hope this helps to answer your question. Good luck :)

  19. QUESTION:
    What are ovarian cysts? Are they dangerous? What can be done for them?
    My 18 year old daughter has large size cysts on her ovaries. Had ultrasound done and the doctors aren’t offering any answers to a diagnosis. Help!

    • ANSWER:
      Typically, ovarian cysts are functional (not disease related) and occur as a normal process of ovulation. During the days before ovulation, a follicle grows. But at the time of expected ovulation, the follicle fails to break open and release an egg, as it is supposed to. Instead, the fluid within the follicle remains and forms a cyst.

      Functional, or physiological, ovarian cysts usually disappear within 8-12 weeks without treatment. They are relatively common, and are more common during a woman’s childbearing years (puberty to menopause). Ovarian cysts are rare after menopause.

      Functional ovarian cysts are not the same as ovarian tumors (including ovarian cancer) or cysts due to hormone-related conditions such as polycystic ovarian disease. Some non-functional ovarian cysts must be treated to go away.

      An ovarian cyst can cause pain if it pushes on nearby structures, ruptures or bleeds. Pain may also occur if the cyst is twisted or causes twisting (torsion) of the fallopian tube.

      Often no symptoms are noted and ovarian cysts are found only be routine examinations. Others can cause symptoms, including changes in the menstrual cycle, including shorter or longer periods, skipped periods, and/or spotting between periods, pelvic pain or ache, especially during sexual intercourse or at the start or finish of menstruation, feelings of nausea or queasiness or breast tenderness.Usually birth control pills may be prescribed to help establish normal cycles and decrease the development of functional ovarian cysts.

      Simple ovarian cysts that are larger than 5-10 centimetres and complex ovarian cysts that persist should and will usually be surgically removed via laparoscopy (minimal invasive surgery).

      Is the doctor you have taken your daughter to your usual doctor or a gynaecologist? I would recommend that if your doctor isn’t a gynaecologist and isn’t offering any answers that you consult with a gynaecologist who specialize in this kind of thing and will be able to better help your daughter find an answer to this and which way would be the way to go as far as treatment.

      I have suffered from many bilateral ovarian cysts over the past 10 years and have surgery 2 times to have them removed (it wasn’t anything too serious).

      I hope this helps to answer your question. Good luck :)

  20. QUESTION:
    There some blood mass of about 6-8cm dia in both the overy, what is this and and how it can be cure, Help?
    is it surgery is only option r can be cure by medicine, what is the medicine?
    Thanks for your nice reply. she takes some medicine which may be similer to birth control pills. pregancy is not any issue, we ahve kids, but we are fear for the surgery that is why we want treatment by medicine prefered.

    • ANSWER:
      Sounds like you are describing a “chocolate cyst” which is an endometrioma.

      Usually endometriomas that are 4 cm or larger do not go away without surgery. Sometimes if they are smaller than 4 cm, they go away in time on their own. Some doctors prescribe birth control pills to try to shrink them…although, this is not always effective.

      Are you in any pain from these? Are you trying to get pregnant? The answers to these questions may be the deciding factor on if you choose to have surgery to remove them.

      Endometriomas are not known to cause cancer. However, they cannot be sure that they are indeed endometriomas until they get in there and biospy them. Endometriomas can cause the fallopian tubes to get plugged thus interfering with fertility.

      EDIT…

      If I was done having kids, and didn’t have any pain from it (including painful intercourse), I would do the conservative treatment as well….periodic ultrasounds to monitor and hormone meds to try to shrink. But that is just MY opinion.

      I’m faced with this problem right now. Except, we don’t have kids yet and we have been trying (I’m 35) and I do have pain from it. I’ve been putting off the surgery for 4 months now, but the Pill didn’t do anything so far to shrink it. If it was a fluid filled cyst, it most likely would have shrunk it. So they are thinking it is either an endometrioma or a dermoid (gross!)

      If left untreated, there is a risk of ovarian torsion (ovary twisting, cutting off the blood supply and the ovary dying…emergency surgery is required if this happens).

      Good luck to your wife for whatever treatment you two choose.

  21. QUESTION:
    Anyone have any luck getting pregnant on Serophene?
    I had a moral pregnancy last January and I just found out I have endometriosis. I will be started Serophene next week. So far my husband and I have had no luck on our own :( Has anyone had any luck on getting pregnant on Serophene??? Also, what cycle day do you try to conceive on?

    • ANSWER:
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  22. QUESTION:
    can i use birth control while i have cyst?
    i have stopped using birth control since i had a side effect on them, i was over bleeding, my doc says that the cyst was causing it. is it true?

    • ANSWER:
      I found this Information for you hope it helps chic : What is an ovarian cyst?
      An ovarian cyst is a sac filled with fluid or a semisolid material that forms on or within one of the ovaries, the small organs in the pelvis that make female hormones and hold egg cells.
      Functional ovarian cysts, which are relatively common, should not be confused with other types of cysts that are disease-related. Conditions such as polycystic ovary syndrome and ovarian cancer also involve growths on the ovaries. Tell your health care provider if you have any of the symptoms listed below. He or she can determine the type of cyst you have.
      What are the symptoms of an ovarian cyst?
      Some smaller cysts cause no symptoms; you may not even know you have a cyst. Larger cysts may cause the following symptoms:

      A change in your normal menstrual bleeding (abnormal bleeding)
      Pelvic pain or a dull ache in your back
      A feeling of fullness (bloating) in your lower belly
      Pain during intercourse
      Painful periods
      Some prolonged symptoms may be associated with a condition called polycystic ovary syndrome, a hormonal imbalance that causes irregular periods and other hormone-related problems, including obesity and infertility. Other symptoms of polycystic ovary syndrome include hirsutism (increased growth of body hair) and obesity.

      What causes an ovarian cyst?
      The exact cause of ovarian cysts is not known, but they tend to form when the ovary produces too much of the hormone estrogen.
      How is an ovarian cyst diagnosed?
      Your health care provider will first rule out pregnancy as the cause of your symptoms. He or she then may use the following tests to diagnose an ovarian cyst:

      A pelvic exam — During this exam, the doctor uses an instrument to widen the vagina, which allows the doctor to examine the vagina, cervix and uterus. The doctor also feels the reproductive organs for any lumps or changes.
      Blood tests — These tests are used to measure the levels of certain hormones in the blood.
      Ultrasound — This test uses sound waves to create images of the body’s internal organs. It can be used to detect cysts on the ovaries.
      Laparoscopy — This is a procedure, performed in an operating room, in which the doctor inserts a small device through an incision (cut) in the abdomen. He or she views the reproductive organs and pelvic cavity using the device. During a laparoscopy, small cysts or samples of tissue for testing may be removed.
      How is an ovarian cyst treated?
      Functional ovarian cysts generally go away without treatment. Your health care provider may give you medications containing hormones (such as birth control pills) to stop ovulation. If you do not ovulate, you will not form functional cysts. In some cases, surgery may be necessary to remove a cyst.

      Types of surgery
      The type of surgery used depends on the size of the cyst and how it appears on the ultrasound. The different procedures used include:

      Laparoscopy — This is a procedure in which the doctor inserts a small device through an incision in the abdomen. He or she views the reproductive organs and pelvic cavity using the device. If the cyst is small, the doctor can remove it through tiny incisions made in the pubic hairline.

      Laparotomy — This procedure uses a bigger incision to remove the cyst. The cyst will be tested for cancer. If it is cancer, the doctor may need to remove one or both ovaries, the uterus, a fold of fatty tissue called the omentum and some lymph nodes. Lymph nodes are small, bean-shaped structures found throughout the body that produce and store infection-fighting cells, but may contain cancer cells.

      What are the complications of an ovarian cyst?
      If a cyst breaks open, it can cause severe pain and swelling in the abdomen.

      Can ovarian cysts be prevented?
      Taking medications that contain hormones (such as birth control pills) will stop ovulation. However, many women taking low-dose oral contraceptives may still ovulate. Although there has been no study that shows that oral contraceptive pills reduce the formation of the ovarian cysts, many physicians still do prescribe this regimen.

      When should I call my health care provider?
      Call your health care provider if any of the following occur:
      Your menstrual periods are late, irregular, or painful
      Your abdominal pain doesn’t go away
      Your abdomen becomes enlarged or swollen
      You have trouble urinating or emptying your bladder completely
      You have pain during intercourse
      You have feelings of fullness (bloating), pressure, or discomfort in your abdomen
      You lose weight for no apparent reason
      You feel generally ill

  23. QUESTION:
    Doctor says I might have a cyst on my ovaries?
    My period has been pretty even in the past. I would get it once a month and it would last about 6 days… but up until a little while ago, my periods have been spread apart by 2 or 3 months and there has been little bits of clotting. So now my doctor says I have to get an ultrasound to check for a cyst… what does this mean?

    • ANSWER:
      Typically, ovarian cysts are functional (not disease related) and occur as a normal process of ovulation. During the days before ovulation, a follicle grows. But at the time of expected ovulation, the follicle fails to break open and release an egg, as it is supposed to. Instead, the fluid within the follicle remains and forms a cyst.

      Functional, or physiological, ovarian cysts usually disappear within 8-12 weeks without treatment. They are relatively common, and are more common during a woman’s childbearing years (puberty to menopause). Ovarian cysts are rare after menopause.

      Functional ovarian cysts are not the same as ovarian tumors (including ovarian cancer) or cysts due to hormone-related conditions such as polycystic ovarian disease. Some non-functional ovarian cysts must be treated to go away.

      An ovarian cyst can cause pain if it pushes on nearby structures, ruptures or bleeds. Pain may also occur if the cyst is twisted or causes twisting (torsion) of the fallopian tube.

      Symptoms of ovarian cysts can include:

      * Pelvic pain – constant, dull aching
      * Pain with intercourse or pelvic pain during movement
      * Pain during bowel movements
      * Pelvic pain shortly after beginning or ending a menstrual period
      * Abnormal uterine bleeding (change from normal menstrual pattern)
      * Longer than usual menstrual cycle
      * Shorter than usual menstrual cycle
      * Absent menstruation
      * Irregular menstruation
      * Abdominal bloating or swelling

      Often no symptoms are noted and ovarian cysts are found only be routine examinations. Usually birth control pills may be prescribed to help establish normal cycles and decrease the development of functional ovarian cysts.

      Simple ovarian cysts that are larger than 5-10 centimetres and complex ovarian cysts that persist should and will usually be surgically removed via laparoscopy (minimal invasive surgery).

      I would recommend that you wait until you have had your ultrasound and if you do have a cyst that you speak with your doctor/gyno about this and ask them to answer any questions or concerns you may have.

      I have suffered from many bilateral ovarian cysts over the past 10 years and have surgery 2 times to have them removed (it wasn’t anything too serious).

      I hope this helps to answer your question. Good luck :)

  24. QUESTION:
    how can i get rid of ovarian cyst without going through an operation??
    a scan showed two large cysts and their is pain when i press my tummy where they are located

    • ANSWER:
      Birth control can shrink it and make it go away (maybe)

      I have had cyst’s taken off….It is not painful (well it hurts a bit) but they only cut your navel and go in and remove it and you are out the same day as you go into surgery. out patient surgery.

      If your cysts are large then i would have surgery cause it will just cause you pain and they could rupture

      If you have a small functional ovarian cyst that is not causing any problems, your doctor may recommend a “watch and wait” approach. That is, you may need to return for a follow­up examination or ultrasound after one or two menstrual cycles, when there is a good chance that the cyst will have dissolved. Your doctor may suggest you avoid intercourse during this time, since it can cause a cyst to rupture. If the cyst grows, especially if it becomes larger than about 2 inches, it may need to be removed surgically.

      While small functional ovarian cysts generally disappear over time, they also tend to recur with subsequent menstrual cycles. In most cases, functional cysts can be controlled with the use of birth control pills, which reduce the hormones that promote growth of cysts and prevent formation of large, mature follicles that can turn into cysts. If you are already taking birth control pills for contraception, and think you may have an ovarian cyst, see your doctor because it is unlikely to be a functional cyst.

      It may take a few months of using birth control pills before your cysts clear up. Your doctor can determine if the pills have been successful by repeating the pelvic exam, the ultrasound, or both. Your cysts may or may not return once you stop taking birth control pills. You can decide with your doctor how long you wish to stay on the pills.

      Polycystic Ovaries: No More Surgery
      Treatment for polycystic ovaries is more varied. If you have polycystic ovaries and are having problems conceiving, your doctor may recommend that you take clomiphene citrate (Clomid) to stimulate ovulation.

      If you are not trying to get pregnant, and you have infrequent periods or no periods due to polycystic ovaries, the treatment is different. Your doctor may start you on the synthetic hormone called medroxyprogesterone acetate (Provera), which is similar to the natural progesterone your body would produce if you were ovulating. Provera fills in for the progesterone that would ordinarily appear after ovulation, allowing you to menstruate. This is important because even if you are not ovulating, your ovaries are still producing the estrogen that causes the uterine lining to grow. Without sufficient progesterone, the lining won’t be shed during the menstrual period, and can grow too much. Although you probably feel fine and may not be eager for your periods to return, if your body is exposed only to estrogen without progesterone for long periods of time, the overgrowth of the uterine lining may increase the danger of cancer developing in the uterus.

      There are several different schedules used for taking Provera tablets. Most experts agree that one good option is to take one 10­milligram tablet of Provera for 10 days each month. Taking the tablets on the first 10 days of the month makes it easy to remember. You should expect some menstrual bleeding approximately 3 to 5 days after you stop taking the tablets. Don’t forget that even though you have polycystic ovaries, you may ovulate occasionally, and it is possible to become pregnant. Provera is not a contraceptive pill. In fact, it is not recommended for use during pregnancy. If you need contraception, you should continue to use your preferred method during your treatment with Provera.

      During laparoscopy, the doctor inserts a narrow tube with a fiberoptic light at one end into the lower abdomen through a small incision just below the navel. This minor surgical procedure is used to diagnose many gynecological problems that may not be identifiable with less invasive methods, such as ultrasound or x­ray. For example, laparoscopy can help identify particular types of ovarian cysts, or determine the cause of pelvic pain or fertility problems.

      Laparoscopy can also be used to treat your cyst. If it’s small enough, the surgeon may be able to either drain the fluid from it or remove it through the laparoscope. Use of the laparoscope has eliminated the need for much major abdominal surgery.

      Though laparoscopy is generally an outpatient procedure, it is usually performed under general anesthesia. This means that you will be required not to eat or drink for at least 8 hours prior to your surgery. You will also have a physical exam and routine blood and urine tests to be certain that you have no underlying illness or infection.

      Often, using a vaginal speculum, the surgeon will attach a small instrument to the cervix that will allow movement of the uterus as needed during the procedure. The surgeon will then make a one-inch incision just below the navel and insert a small needle to deliver harmless carbon dioxide gas into the abdomen. The gas serves to lift the abdominal wall away from the internal organs and create a space so that the surgeon can see them. The needle is then replaced with the illuminated laparoscope. When the operation is finished, usually after 30 to 60 minutes, the gas is removed through a thin tube placed in the same incision. A few stitches close the incision which will probably be covered with a Band­Aid® type of dressing.

      After your laparoscopy you will stay in the recovery room until you are feeling awake and alert and until your vital signs (temperature, pulse, blood pressure) are normal. Before you are sent home (usually within 2 hours after your surgery), you will receive instructions on follow­up care from your doctor and nurse. Postoperative pain should be minimal, but your doctor will probably give you a prescription for a mild painkiller.

      It is not unusual to have some abdominal cramping or shoulder discomfort due to the carbon dioxide gas that filled your abdomen but this should gradually subside over a few days. You will probably be able to bathe and shower as usual, but you may need to avoid strenuous physical activity as well as sexual intercourse for a day or two.

      Postoperative complications are rare, but be sure to call your doctor if you have bleeding from your incision, severe abdominal cramping or pain, or a fever over 100 degrees. Your doctor will probably want to see you a week or two later to check how you are doing, and to remove any stitches that are not the absorbable type.

      Though laparoscopic incisions are truly Band-Aid sized, the operation frequently requires more than one puncture. Shown here, the surgeon views an ovary through one incision while manipulating it through another.

      Some doctors treat the symptoms of polycystic ovaries with low­dose birth control pills. When you take birth control pills your normal periods will resume, and you’ll be protected against pregnancy if that is a concern. Another advantage of birth control pills over Provera is that they decrease the production of the male hormone androgen. Not only does this help control excess hair growth, sometimes a symptom of polycystic ovaries, but it also may reduce the risk of heart disease in women with polycystic ovaries.

      The original cure for polycystic ovaries was a surgical procedure called ovarian wedge resection. This involved removing at least one­third to one­half of each ovary in order to return it to normal size. In most women, this operation resulted in resumption of normal periods and normal fertility. The wedge resection is rarely done anymore thanks to the availability of drugs that induce ovulation and restore normal periods.

      When Surgery Is Needed
      Sometimes, however, surgical removal of a cyst is the only option. Doctors take several factors into account when deciding whether surgery is advisable. One of the most important considerations is the size of the cyst. Because there is a very slight risk of a large ovarian cyst becoming cancerous, the larger your cyst, the more likely the surgery. Although gynecologists differ on the precise “cut­off point,” in most cases if a cyst is at least 2 to 2.5 inches in diameter (about the size of a tennis ball), it will be surgically removed. If your cyst is less than 2 inches, your doctor may want to track it with ultrasound examinations over a period of a few months to see whether it grows to a size that requires surgery.

      Another factor doctors consider is your age. Because ovarian cysts are less likely to become cancerous in a woman in her 20s than one in her 40s, or in a woman who has passed menopause, your chance of needing surgical removal of an ovarian cyst increases with age.

      The type of cyst is also an important consideration. A “simple cyst,” containing only liquid material, is less likely to require surgery than a “complex cyst,” containing a mixture of materials. However, if a “simple” functional cyst grows quite large or bleeds, surgery may be necessary. Once your doctor has determined the size and type of cyst you have, he or she will discuss with you the advisability of surgery. The common types of cysts that almost routinely demand surgical removal are endometriomas, cystadenomas, and dermoid cysts.

      Endometriomas. Because endometrial cysts are caused by endometriosis, you may wonder whether the drugs used to control endometriosis could also be effective in treating endometrial cysts. (See the chapter on “Keeping Endometriosis at Bay” for more on these drugs.) And indeed, these medications may help control the growth of cysts. However, because endometrial cysts can grow quite large and are prone to rupture, perhaps causing internal bleeding, these cysts are often treated surgically.

      Cystadenomas. Since cystadenomas are almost always benign, it would seem reasonable to leave them alone unless they are large or cause complications. The problem is that cystadenomas often do become enormous, causing complications simply due to their size. An additional concern is that cystadenomas are “neoplasms,” or new growths of abnormal tissue, and evaluation of neoplasms can be tricky. It is difficult to determine whether a neoplasm is benign or malignant simply by looking at it. Instead, tissue from most types of neoplasms needs to be analyzed under a microscope, and the only way to get a tissue sample is through surgery.

      Dermoid Cysts. Dermoid cysts are also neoplasms, and therefore candidates for surgical removal. You may know before surgery that your cyst is a dermoid because if it contains teeth as one­third to one­half of them do, your doctor may have seen them on an x­ray.

      What to Expect
      When the Doctor Operates
      Goto top

      Once surgery is decided upon, you’ll have a meeting with your surgeon to discuss the operation and have a physical exam.

      Before Surgery
      Your surgeon will review the reason for your operation, the possible risks, no matter how small, and any possible aftereffects. You may find it helpful to bring a written list of questions to the meeting. Feel free to ask your surgeon to explain the operation by drawing a simple diagram of what will be removed.

      Although at this point you will probably feel there are no lab tests you have not already undergone, a few basic studies may be ordered to establish that you are healthy enough for surgery:

      A complete blood count (CBC), to make sure that you have no underlying infection and that your body can tolerate loss of a small amount of blood during surgery
      A urinalysis to screen for infection and diseases such as diabetes or kidney problems
      A blood sample to check your blood type, in the unlikely event that you need a transfusion
      A recent chest x­ray or recent electrocardiogram (ECG) if you are over 40 years old
      In Surgery
      If you have a large cyst, your surgeon will probably remove it through an incision in your lower abdomen. The general term for any operation through the abdomen is laparotomy. If the cyst is small enough, your doctor may be able to remove it with a laparoscope, which requires only a small incision.

      The type of operation you will have will depend on the size and nature of your cyst. The goal is to remove only the cyst, leaving the ovary intact. When the cyst alone is removed, the operation is called an ovarian cystectomy. If a portion of the ovary is also removed, the operation is a partial oophorectomy. Occasionally, the large size of the cyst or complications such as bleeding, twisting, or rupture, may require removal of the fallopian tube with the ovary. This operation is called salpingo­oophorectomy. Surgeons make every attempt to preserve the reproductive organs, especially if you have not yet reached menopause since it’s still possible to have children when only a small portion of one ovary remains. Removal of the uterus, fallopian tubes, and ovaries (total abdominal hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo­ oophorectomy or TAHBSO) is very rarely used to treat the types of ovarian cysts described in this chapter, unless there is a reasonable chance that your cyst is cancerous.

      After Surgery
      If you have a laparatomy, you will probably be in the hospital for a few days after the surgery. During the early recovery and postoperative period, you will receive fluids and medication through your intravenous (IV) line, but you should be eating solid foods fairly quickly. You will receive medication for pain, and you can expect to be walking around the day after surgery. Your wound should heal quickly, and if your incision was closed with staples, the staples and bandage will probably be removed before you leave the hospital. If you have non­absorbable stitches, they will probably be removed 5 to 7 days after your operation.

      Before you leave the hospital, you will receive a summary of the type of operation that was performed and the type of cyst that you had. You may wish to ask for a copy of the surgery report for your records. You should also receive complete instructions from your doctor or nurse regarding what to expect in the postoperative period.

      You should expect to have some abdominal discomfort for a few days after you return home. You may be given a prescription for a mild pain reliever. You should call your doctor if the medication doesn’t help, or if the pain does not improve after a week. You should also contact your doctor if you develop a fever of over 100 degrees, or if vaginal bleeding is heavier than a normal period.

      You should expect your incision to look quite red and feel uncomfortable for a few weeks. It is normal to notice some dried blood around the incision, but call your doctor if you see pus oozing from the wound. It’s fine to bathe and shower; don’t worry about getting the incision wet as long as it’s not oozing. The red color of the incision will gradually fade, and eventually the scar will barely be visible.

      You may be able to start some non­strenuous physical activity after a week or two. Be sure not to resume intercourse or to use tampons or anything else in the vagina until you have had your postoperative checkup (usually about 2 weeks after surgery). You will probably be able to resume all your normal activities and return to work about 6 weeks after surgery.

      Unless you have had both of your ovaries removed, your periods will return to normal, usually by about 4 to 8 weeks after surgery. Remember that if even a portion of one ovary remains, you can still become pregnant if you’re of childbearing age. That’s one of the many reasons it’s important to discuss the specifics of your surgery with your doctor.

      Chances are that once the ovarian cyst has been removed, it will not recur. However, the operation does not always guarantee that you’ll be cyst­free in the future. As long as you have ovaries, you can have ovarian cysts. It’s a good idea to continue any medical treatments your doctor has prescribed to control the cysts and, of course, to have regular gynecological exams

      good luck

  25. QUESTION:
    Could this pain be cause by an ovarian cysts?
    Last week, (after sex) I had gotten a pain in my pelvic area so bad, I was curled up in a ball for about an hour. Then today, my left ovary starting cramping up and made it hard to move. My monthly is late, my tubes are clamped, so I doubt I’m pregnant. I’ve never had these kind of cramps before, though I do cramp pretty bad when it is time for my monthly. I need some ideas or advice on what it could be.

    • ANSWER:
      Signs and Symptoms of an Ovarian Cyst

      Ovarian cyst is a common occurrence in women. In fact, it is said that most women get ovarian cyst at least once during their childbearing years. However, all of them do not get symptoms. The first ovarian cyst sign is pain and discomfort in the lower abdomen region. It mostly occurs intermittently. Ovarian cyst pain is different for individual cases. It can be an acute pain that lasts for just few minutes or it could be a dull pain that continues for few days. It is either felt in one or both sides of the abdomen. In some cases, pain may be accompanied by fever. Sometimes, the pain may get extended to the lower back and the thighs. Some of the other general complaints of women with ovarian cyst are as follows:
      •Swelling in the abdomen which is often accompanied by a bloated feeling.
      •Irregularities in menstrual cycles that causes delay in period. Some women experience severe pain before or during the periods. Heavy bleeding is likely to occur in many cases.
      •Frequent urge to urinate. This happens when the cyst exerts pressure on bladder. In this condition, acute pain is often experienced while urinating. As a result, emptying bladder becomes difficult.
      •Pain experienced during bowel movement because of pressure put on the bowels by the cyst.
      •Intense pelvic pain after or during sexual intercourse.
      •Nausea, vomiting, and bloating.
      •Breast tenderness and increase in growth of body hair which are triggered by abnormality in hormonal production.
      •Increase in body weight and frequent acne outbreaks may occur when multiple number of ovaries are formed in the ovary. This condition is also known as polycystic ovarian syndrome.
      An ovarian cyst can lead to a lot of health complications. If it gets twisted, blood supply to the cyst stops which badly aggravates the pain. When the cyst becomes large, then there are chances that it may burst.

      Ruptured ovarian cyst symptoms are much more severe than a normal cyst. Here, an intense pain starts all of a sudden and it comes along with lightheadedness, cold hand and feet, breathing difficulty, etc. If ovarian cysts are formed during pregnancy, it can lead to several complications. The symptoms of an ovarian cyst in pregnancy are visible when size of the cyst is quite large or it bursts. The unbearable pain in this condition may cause miscarriage or pre-term labor.

      Ovarian Cyst Treatment

      The treatment for ovarian cyst is based upon a number of factors including its size, location and symptoms. When the symptoms show up occasionally and are not much bothersome, then doctors monitor the cyst with ultrasound after regular interval of time to check any change in size or characteristics of the cyst. For a temporary ovarian cyst pain relief, doctors suggest application of heat and use of vitamin D supplements. To control formation of any new cysts, doctors recommend use of birth control pills. In case the cyst is big enough and is growing further, surgical option is availed. Surgery is also required to treat symptoms of an ovarian cyst rupture. There are a number of techniques available for this kind of surgery. If a woman is in her childbearing years, then the cyst is removed without the removal of ovary. Painful ovarian cyst in pregnant women is closely monitored without any treatment as long as it is not interfering with the pregnancy. If there are any signs of complications, then it is removed by means of surgery without causing any harm to the unborn baby.

      Now, you know what are the symptoms of an ovarian cyst. There is no way you can prevent ovarian cyst. However, if you suspect symptoms of ovarian cyst, then visit your doctor for proper diagnosis. Do not neglect this problem as it can lead to unnecessary complications in future.


ovarian cyst treatment without surgery

Ovarian Cysts After Menopause

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    How long is the approximate wait for an ovarian cyst to go away?
    I just found out today that i have another ovarian cyst about 5 cm the last one was diagnoses about april and it was 7 cm. Supposedly my doc offered to have it removed and giving me the possibility that i would have to lose an ovary. He did the surgery and didn’t have to remove the ovary. I was told afterward that he removed surrounding tissue around the ovary i guess removing some of the cyst. He told me they usually come back. Today the doc i usually go to told me that some cysts go away on there own but I am worried that mine will not i may continue to get them and risk waiting for it to get bigger and burst. If I keep getting these cysts does it seem best to just go ahead and get the cyst removed plus my ovary? I most worried about going into early menopause and im only 21 going through all of these problems. What seems best to wait and see if it goes away in agonizing pain as it gets bigger and burst or just have it taken care of. I would like any ones input on what they would do with this, It is so stressful to think about and I also want another child but how am i going to get ready for a child with a growing cyst? Or having to get cyst after cyst removed and having to wait till my body heals ugh ;( Any input wil be beneficial thanks in advance.
    The first surgery I had was done in april but I have not had another surgery. I havent had surgery for the cyst i have now.Im deciding wether I want to wait and see wether it goes away or have the surgery which is scheduled for next week.

    • ANSWER:
      I think 2-3 weeks.

  2. QUESTION:
    Is there a permanent cure to ovarian cysts?
    I seem to keep getting ovarian cysts (I have had two that have caused serious problems in the last four months). Is there a cure for this that doesn’t involve surgery? My mom wants me to get my ovary removed so that they can’t grow there but that seems really drastic to me.

    • ANSWER:
      Removing your ovary to prevent ovarian cysts is like deciding that to prevent a sprained ankle, you should have your leg amputated. Someone who gets one ovary removed at your age risks a lot of things–mortality rate decreases almost 2x, and you’ll go through menopause early, and you might even have slight fertility problems. And that could still mean that you have ovarian cyst problems in your other ovary. So you’re right, it’s drastic to remove your ovary. It’s replacing one problem with another problem. However, one way to decrease incidence of ovarian cysts is to go on birth control pills. I’m not sure why your doc hasn’t recommended that yet, but it makes a lot of sense.

  3. QUESTION:
    Do you think if Pro-Life men could get pregnant they would feel differently about abortion?
    Seriously. If men had to go through things like periods, endometriosis, ovarian cysts, pregnancy, miscarriages, labor, menopause and all the things us women have to deal with, wouldn’t they be more understanding of our plight?

    Wouldn’t they then want to have the -choice- as to whether or not to have children? Do you think their religious views about women would change?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes. In fact, many pro-life women suddenly become pro-choice… when THEY get pregnant. See: http://mypage.direct.ca/w/writer/anti-tales.html

  4. QUESTION:
    Female reproductive expert please!! Can you still have fibroids and ovarian cysts after menopause?
    I haven’t had a period in 6 years? Prior to my period ending I had ovarian cysts and fibroid tumors. I would have ultrasounds and they got smaller; then finally I had my menopause. I was led to believe that when my period stopped I wouldn’t get them anymore. last year when I had gallbladder surgery they told me I still had them. Until today, though, I had really not had any pain. Today I had severe cramps and swelling, my back hurt, just like when I used to have my period.. I feel like I have the fibroids again. How can I have them if I am not reproducing anymore? Is this possible? Please help!

    • ANSWER:
      If you are not taking hormones, the fibroids should shrink after menopause. Obviously, the cysts haven’t.

      If one of those cysts breaks, it can dump fluid into you abdomen that can be irritating.

      The pain you are having may be totally unrelated to either your fibroids or your cysts. See a doctor ASAP.

  5. QUESTION:
    Do ovarian cysts usually need to be surgically removed?
    I was told today after getting MRI results that I need to see an oncologist. I always thought that most ovarian cysts and fibroids are not cancer. I have no symptoms, no pain, no bleeding.
    Do you think I’ll have to have that godd-awful test called a ‘Hysterosonography?’
    the report mentioned that I should go for a transvaginal sonogram for more information.

    • ANSWER:
      Typically, ovarian cysts are functional (not disease or cancer related) and occur as a normal process of ovulation. During the days before ovulation, a follicle grows. But at the time of expected ovulation, the follicle fails to break open and release an egg, as it is supposed to. Instead, the fluid within the follicle remains and forms a cyst.

      Functional, or physiological, ovarian cysts usually disappear within 8-12 weeks without treatment. They are relatively common, and are more common during a woman’s childbearing years (puberty to menopause). Ovarian cysts are rare after menopause.

      Functional ovarian cysts are not the same as ovarian tumors (including ovarian cancer) or cysts due to hormone-related conditions such as polycystic ovarian disease. Some non-functional ovarian cysts must be treated to go away.

      An ovarian cyst can cause pain if it pushes on nearby structures, ruptures or bleeds. Pain may also occur if the cyst is twisted or causes twisting (torsion) of the fallopian tube.

      Symptoms of ovarian cysts can include:

      * Pelvic pain – constant, dull aching
      * Pain with intercourse or pelvic pain during movement
      * Pain during bowel movements
      * Pelvic pain shortly after beginning or ending a menstrual period
      * Abnormal uterine bleeding (change from normal menstrual pattern)
      * Longer than usual menstrual cycle
      * Shorter than usual menstrual cycle
      * Absent menstruation
      * Irregular menstruation
      * Abdominal bloating or swelling

      Often no symptoms are noted and ovarian cysts are found only be routine examinations. Usually birth control pills may be prescribed to help establish normal cycles and decrease the development of functional ovarian cysts.

      Simple ovarian cysts that are larger than 5-10 centimetres and complex ovarian cysts that persist should and will usually be surgically removed via laparoscopy (minimal invasive surgery).

      I would recommend that you discuss all the details such as the type of cyst, size of cyst etc with your doctor/gyno and ask them to answer any questions or concerns you may have.

      I have suffered from many bilateral ovarian cysts over the past 10 years and have had to have surgery 2 times to the cysts removed (it wasn’t anything too serious).

      I hope this helps to answer your question. Good luck :)

  6. QUESTION:
    Do I need a D and C to get rid of ovarian cyst?
    I am 44 years old. Have not gone thru menopause yet. Started having painful and irregular periods. Had an vaginal ultrasound and diagnosed with ovarian cyst. In doing some research online, I don’t see where D and C is a normal procedure for an ovarian cyst. Is this type of procedure necessary? (I have not had a miscarriage)

    • ANSWER:
      A D&C removes the uterine lining. An ovarian cyst is on the ovaries. These are different body parts and a D&C cannot affect an ovarian cyst. A D&C is done sometimes when a woman has irregular bleeding, though, not just when there’s a miscarriage.

  7. QUESTION:
    Does Fibrocystic Breat Disease and ovarian cysts have any kind of relation to each other?
    I have had FBD since my early teens, and now I am 18 and I have had two ovarian cysts(that I know of within the last 3 months) rupture. Is there any kind of relation between these two conditions? and could this effect my fertility?

    • ANSWER:
      No not in relations…Bra Cancer is much different and it is a cancer as far as I know cancer is malignant and damage is done on normal cells as Cancer feeds off the body to be a over growth of cells and the cells are accepted by the body not as foe but as friend yet the cancer feeds until is uses up the good of the body and rots…
      So far in my recent diagnosis of fibroids…It is not cancerous and at any time fibrois appear..due to being obese as a feature in Black Women more…durring 40′s and women who have not had children and are close to menopausal stages the fibroids will dry up…The body is making one last big bang…stage is set to give yourself a chance or one last call before closing time the fibroids can be treated with drugs or removed by lazer and healing time is 2 to 3 days on a treatment…Total removal of the lining by historectomy will remove the area only responsible for the growth and rinder you unable to have children…even the treatment says no children stage…It can be avoided the idea is to prolong your female hormones nature given and not rush into menopause
      A Pause for the Men…I understand that The Big S is still on and Poppin…Either Way…You are quite young for this so look to speed up having your children …Tell the doctor children are a option in your future…You can still have a baby soon…Cover the basis legal…Marrage if the Guy agrees is a better option than child support or welfare or with your parents help….for you it is possible..option.
      Take care to be here for a long time unless you bleed heavy and unless you are in pain You can live with fibroids for a long time and not have a problem and they grow slow so you have plenty of time to see how you are going to proceed
      Not many doctors will tell you anything you have to be a big vigulanty on the web and look up sources.
      Web MD and Fibroids section of Yahoo was a big brace for me.
      Details even the National NDCC will send you a book for free
      booklet…
      I would read about MS and Fibroids and as I turn 40..I go for a checkup and the doctor finds things and I thought I was the picture of health to me … Overly healthy in a way the fibroids do not hurt me until they started ultrasounding and picking with them in test…I am looking at option of hystorectomy..I want this as a last resort…Kind of thanking God I have options
      Lazar…Emoblization…Therapy Support Groups…I am not going to give up and give in without a fight…While I still have God and a great fight in me to try to live…
      I heard on the radio One woman said it is common and she can feel hers being fed if she drinked sweet tea or fried chicken…I too feel to cut of the source of it being fed and it will need to die or fall out or burn out or cut out …Idea it is genetics and it will come back and case out other areas…
      I have a big choice to make even with the doctors I feel I got to answer to God for myself…I lay on MRI tables thinking of the people before me and after me….The times in church when they said to prepare for times like these in your health with your faith …I am not going to give up on God and I wonder about what must I face to be saved…What must I give up to be saved…A man on the Radio said You do not know what you must give up to be saved in this race for life.. Or how what you are going to face will be a great help to others going through on the journey…So I made a decision to follow Christ example…and I figure he gave up his life ….for us and many of us can not face what he faced for us. He ask for so little to live right and some of us can not even face living right and following the so called rules and staying off Jerry and Maurry…It seems like nothing happens to them…They just mess up a poor innocent baby…and have to work harder to make a great life come for the child…

  8. QUESTION:
    How young is too young for a hysterectomy and oophorectomy?
    I’m 27 with 2 kids I was told I’d never have. I have endometriosis and recurring ovarian cysts and adhesions. I’ve had 7 surgeries (6 laparoscopies and 1 laparotomy) in the last 10 years and I’m going to have another one in less than 2 weeks. DH and I were hoping to try for a 3rd baby later this year but with the pain I’m in I’m almost ready to throw in the towel. Is it too soon to give up? BTW – my mom was only 23 when she HAD to have a hysterectomy.

    • ANSWER:
      There’s never a ‘right age’ for a hysterectomy. There are extensive potential long-term risks involved in early surgical menopause. However, often, the reason or basis for the hysterectomy outweighs the potential risks. However, Endometriosis is not one of those reasons.

      Endometriosis is absolutely not cured by hysterectomy and it needs no HRT to continue thriving following removal of the uterus/ovaries. Endo implants themselves produce their own estrogen-synthesizing enzyme, known as aromatase, and therefore, any disease left behind during the hysterectomy will continue to cause symptoms.

      The key to living well with Endo is to remove disease, not healthy organs. Before going into this next surgery, take time to learn about excision surgery. See the following websites:

      http://www.centerforendo.com

      http://www.endometriosistreatment.org

      http://www.endoexcision.com

      Hysterectomy has a role in Endometriosis treatment, particularly in advanced stages in those who also have adenomyosis. However, it is not a valid treatment to simply remove the uterus and ovaries without removing all the disease left behind.

      Good luck to you.

  9. QUESTION:
    Pregnancy and a history of Ovarian Cysts?
    I have reoccuring ovarian cysts. This condition began at the onset of purberty. Since the first cyst I have been on birth control. I got married almost three months ago and we are ready to begin trying. Is there any research information available to document the reoccurance of cysts after pregnancy? Does it decrease? My doctor has said that I will be on birth control until menopause to stop the cysts (except when trying of course when I’ll be under a strict monitoring from the Dr.). Has anyone experienced a reduced number of cysts after their first pregnancy?

    • ANSWER:
      hey love, the good news, after you get pregnant, the cysts go into a sort of hibernation period where they actually decrease in size… however, when your periods start again, without monitoring from your MD, the cysts will reoccur…. the only thing that you can do to stop this, is to have the larger cysts removed before they actually burst, or to go into a state such as an induced “hormone reduction:” as the change of life would be, and you would then suffer from hot flashes, etc. so unless, you are in an extreme amount of pain, or the cysts are bleeding, I would just abide by the MD’s decision for now…. good luck, love, all the best…

  10. QUESTION:
    i have ovarian cysts are these curable and would they turn into cancer?
    i never had my menstrual period since 21 yrs old and dr said its menopause but at 21yrs old they wanted to do more tests on me but to much of a hassle plus i felt like a a freak they couldn’t figure this out and some dr.s kept sending me here there then i did have one operation.well any way my ? was how do you get these ovarian cysts?

    • ANSWER:
      there are different kinds of cysts – some are very simple but some could be very dangerous – check below

  11. QUESTION:
    Could Endometriosis be causing the constant pain in my lower left abdomen and lower back since January?
    Kidney stones, Gall stones, UTI, Ovarian Cysts have all been ruled out by diagnostic testing.
    Last February, I was diagnosed with Endometriosis and had surgery to remove cysts from each ovary. I had a 9cm cyst on my left ovary and a 5 cm cyst on my right ovary.

    • ANSWER:
      Normally tissue of endometrium is present in the inner lining of uterus. In endometriosis this tissue appear in other parts of the body like ovaries, gut, U bladder, peritoneum etc. Pain comes mostly before and during menstruation.
      One thing more that this condition comes after puberty and regresses in menopause.

  12. QUESTION:
    How to treat an ovarian cyst?
    I just found out I have a little ovarian cyst. I’ve already been in pain for two weeks. I can’t take anymore. What’s gonna happen?? Supposebly they go away on their own, how long till it goes awayy? Help

    • ANSWER:
      Hi,
      You can’t depend on symptoms alone to tell you if you have an ovarian cyst. In fact, you’ll likely have no symptoms at all. Or if you do, the symptoms may be similar to those of other conditions, such as endometriosis, pelvic inflammatory disease, ectopic pregnancy or ovarian cancer. Even appendicitis and diverticulitis can produce signs and symptoms that mimic a ruptured ovarian cyst.

      Still, it’s important to be watchful of any symptoms or changes in your body and to know which symptoms are serious. If you have an ovarian cyst, you may experience one or more of the following signs and symptoms:

      ■Menstrual irregularities
      ■Pelvic pain — a constant or intermittent dull ache that may radiate to your lower back and thighs
      ■Pelvic pain shortly before your period begins or just before it ends
      ■Pelvic pain during intercourse (dyspareunia)
      ■Pain during bowel movements or pressure on your bowels
      ■Nausea, vomiting or breast tenderness similar to that experienced during pregnancy
      ■Fullness or heaviness in your abdomen
      ■Pressure on your rectum or bladder — difficulty emptying your bladder completely
      When to see a doctor
      Seek immediate medical attention if you have:

      ■Sudden, severe abdominal or pelvic pain
      ■Pain accompanied by fever or vomiting
      These signs and symptoms — or those of shock, such as cold, clammy skin, rapid breathing, and lightheadedness or weakness — indicate an emergency and mean that you need to see a doctor right away.
      Treatment depends on your age, the type and size of your cyst, and your symptoms. Your doctor may suggest:

      ■Watchful waiting. You can wait and be re-examined in one to three months if you’re in your reproductive years, you have no symptoms and an ultrasound shows you have a simple, fluid-filled cyst. Your doctor will likely recommend that you get follow-up pelvic ultrasounds at periodic intervals to see if your cyst has changed in size.

      Watchful waiting, including regular monitoring with ultrasound, is also a common treatment option recommended for postmenopausal women if a cyst is filled with fluid and is less than 2 centimeters in diameter.

      ■Birth control pills. Your doctor may recommend birth control pills to reduce the chance of new cysts developing in future menstrual cycles. Oral contraceptives offer the added benefit of significantly reducing your risk of ovarian cancer — the risk decreases the longer you take birth control pills.
      ■Surgery. Your doctor may suggest removal of a cyst if it is large, doesn’t look like a functional cyst, is growing or persists through two or three menstrual cycles. Cysts that cause pain or other symptoms may be removed.

      Some cysts can be removed without removing the ovary in a procedure known as a cystectomy. Your doctor may also suggest removing the affected ovary and leaving the other intact in a procedure known as oophorectomy. Both procedures may allow you to maintain your fertility if you’re still in your childbearing years. Leaving at least one ovary intact also has the benefit of maintaining a source of estrogen production.

      If a cystic mass is cancerous, however, your doctor will advise a hysterectomy to remove both ovaries and your uterus. After menopause, the risk of a newly found cystic ovarian mass being cancerous increases. As a result, doctors more commonly recommend surgery when a cystic mass develops on the ovaries after menopause.

  13. QUESTION:
    how long can I expect to be in recovery for after a major operation?
    I am going in for an op to remove an ovarian cyst. I may also be having a hysterectomy at the same time if the Dr feels it will be neccesary. I have heard from various people that they have had a new lease of life and/or have gone straight into the menopause. I do not know what to expect so any advice would be helpful.

    Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      I have all the above done it normally takes about 6 weeks for ur body to recover. but every one is different, so depending on how u feel just be careful, no heavy lifting, i got a new lease of life and thy gave me hrt right away, just watch your weight i put on about 2 stone after, but it might not happen to you, so good luck and take care.

  14. QUESTION:
    How do I know if I have an Ovarian Cyst or if i’m Pregnant?
    Is there anyway to know if I have an Ovarian Cyst or if i’m Pregnant without going to a doctor?

    Can I have any ides? I’ve just found out that they have the same symptoms….
    ideas* sorry type
    I also did some research, and I may even have an Ectopic Pregnancy?

    • ANSWER:
      Typically, ovarian cysts are functional (not disease or cancer related) and occur as a normal process of ovulation. During the days before ovulation, a follicle grows. But at the time of expected ovulation, the follicle fails to break open and release an egg, as it is supposed to. Instead, the fluid within the follicle remains and forms a cyst.

      Functional, or physiological, ovarian cysts usually disappear within 8-12 weeks without treatment. They are relatively common, and are more common during a woman’s childbearing years (puberty to menopause). Ovarian cysts are rare after menopause.

      Functional ovarian cysts are not the same as ovarian tumors (including ovarian cancer) or cysts due to hormone-related conditions such as polycystic ovarian disease. Some non-functional ovarian cysts must be treated to go away.

      An ovarian cyst can cause pain if it pushes on nearby structures, ruptures or bleeds. Pain may also occur if the cyst is twisted or causes twisting (torsion) of the fallopian tube.

      Symptoms of ovarian cysts can include:

      * Pelvic pain – constant, dull aching
      * Pain with intercourse or pelvic pain during movement
      * Pain during bowel movements
      * Pelvic pain shortly after beginning or ending a menstrual period
      * Abnormal uterine bleeding (change from normal menstrual pattern)
      * Longer than usual menstrual cycle
      * Shorter than usual menstrual cycle
      * Absent menstruation
      * Irregular menstruation
      * Abdominal bloating or swelling

      Often no symptoms are noted and ovarian cysts are found only be routine examinations. Usually birth control pills may be prescribed to help establish normal cycles and decrease the development of functional ovarian cysts.

      Simple ovarian cysts that are larger than 5-10 centimetres and complex ovarian cysts that persist should and will usually be surgically removed via laparoscopy (minimal invasive surgery).

      I would recommend that if you think you have an ovarian cyst that you consult with your doctor/gyno about this and ask them to answer any questions or concerns you may have.

      I have suffered from many bilateral ovarian cysts over the past 11 years and have surgery 2 times to have them removed (it wasn’t anything too serious).

      I hope this helps to answer your question. Good luck :)

  15. QUESTION:
    Question about my girlfriends sex drive?
    We have been together and intimate for three years. Her sexual desire is still there but when it comes time to perform she just isn’t ever wet enough. She is only 18 but has many problems like ovarian cysts and HPV but I’m not aware that either of those could cause that… Her gynocologist suggested it might be pre-menopause but she hasn’t gotten tested for it yet. Is that even possible at that age? I can do without sex I’m just tired of feeling like I’m doing something wrong or that I’m not good enough.

    • ANSWER:
      Ovarian cysts could cause some of her dryness…

      If the desire for sex is there…then it could be a medical problem. Vaginal dryness can be due to any hormone imbalance. She does need to talk with her doctor about this…but have you tried lubricants…Astroglide…KY gel…Replins?? They can make all the difference..

      Just the stress in knowing this drying can take away from the moment…making it just as bad for her as it does for you.

      I hope you two can work this out.

  16. QUESTION:
    what is the difference if any between an ovarian cysts filled with blood and a chocolate cysts?
    before i was ever diagnosed with endo. i had a chocolate cysts burst on my ovary and it bound to my intestines. ouch!! 10 yrs later i m told i have a blood filled cysts on my right ovary. i had a partial hysterectomy last yr and was wondering if this is a sign its coming back or if its just a regular cysts with just a bit more pain and not endo related. and aside from surgury,…is there anything i can do to get it to go away quicker? or to make it burst and be done with it? anticipation mixed with the pain of feeling like your ovarys bein squeezed to death just aint doin it for me. lol and btw..its not strangulated. just hurts like hell. any help would be great!! thank you. t.
    ok but is blood in a cysts mean for sure its a chocolate cysts or not? and yes ive already done the lupron and its a horrible drug. i have permanent bone loss from it. been there done that with about everything possible related to endo. just wondering if this is the same thing repeating all over again.

    • ANSWER:
      Ovarian cysts filled with blood and debris are chocolate cysts; they are the same. They are called Endometriomas, often present in a lot of women with Endo and can become excruciatingly painful and quite large. I’m sure you know, but a hysterectomy is not a cure for Endo. The recurrence, such as that which you are experiencing, is quite high in the 5 year window following the procedure. If all Endo is not truly removed, it will recur, no matter whether you have uterus, ovaries, tubes, etc. or not. There is no cure for Endometriosis. Anyone telling you different is simply uninformed or is still adhering to outdated myths and old wive’s tales like “pregnancy, menopause and hysterectomy are curative.” They aren’t, nor are any meds a cure – they can provide temporary relief for some women some of the time, but they are only stop gap measures and all come with potentially negative and long lasting side effects. HOWEVER, there are ways to get help and feel better…my suggestion would be to seek the help of a true Endo specialist, one who can truly surgically *excise* the disease through advanced laparoscopic surgery. Excision is far different from the ablation, fulguration, cauterization and vaporization methods commonly used by most doctors who think that because they took a laser course, they are suddenly Endo experts. Typically, they will laser “what they could” and place the patient on suppresive meds afterwards. This is common, but it is not the best practice. Excision through any means (laser, monopolar scissors, etc.) is supported by scientific data as being the best way to eradicate the disease with a very low recurrence rate for the long term. Please visit any of the following websites to learn about excision and see one of the specialists:

      www.centerforendo.com
      www.endometriosistreatment.org
      www.endoexcision.com
      www.adlap.com
      www.drcook.com

      Good luck and I hope it all works out and you are able to be seen by someone who can truly help you, as those docs at the links above. You have a right to have your disease effectively treated and regain your quality of life – you need not suffer. Best wishes.

  17. QUESTION:
    How to stop getting ovarian cysts?
    im 16 and have gotten 6 ovarian cysts in the last three years which have all ruptured which is very uncommon for my age. I have tried birth control to stop them from forming and when that didnt work my doctor upped my estrogen levels with nuvaring but I got anoyher one last week. How do I get them to stop from coming back? I dont want to deal with this my whole life

    • ANSWER:
      1. Menses irregularities.
      2. Indiscriminate consumption of steroids in the absence of supervision by a super-specialist, endocrinologist.
      3. Stress & Strain.

      MENSES*
      1. Every young girl/spinster/woman must know the significance of Menses cycles, regularity of maintenance with the aid of acupressure techniques & to maintain ‘the best of woman’s health’ for life. The success depends up on the extent of compliance of all stipulated instructions.
      Menses——- is nothing but the God’s Special gift given to the female. It is one of the routes of excretion of toxins, pus cells, dead cells running to millions produced during Catabolism [part of metabolism on daily basis], bad blood, bacteria, viruses, hormonal discharges, etc.
      So long as a female passes through regular menses right from puberty to menopause, she will be well balanced, pretty with natural and healthy glow, good moods of love and affection, excellent immunity/disease resistance power, excellent growth in height up to 21st birthday, etc.
      Irregular periods/heavy periods may be an offshoot of hormonal imbalance, psychological disturbances, indiscriminate consumption of birth control pills, steroids for other causes like allergy, thyroid problems, asthma/bronchitis, etc.
      By and large, the menses cycle ranges from 3 weeks to 5 weeks as and when it is regular. In certain ladies, it is not regular. It can be regulated just in 5 days. During menses, it is advisable to take maximum rest.
      [a]. Ur [Menses related gonads]-remote control-Acupressure points are located in Ur wrists and ankles on both sides to be activated for regulating Ur menses cycle.
      Remote control Acupressure points given by the God. For Treatment, hard-pressure is to be applied on & around these points with Ur thumb and middle finger.
      To activate Ur gonads—13 [vagina], No.14 [uterus]. No.15 [Testes & Ovaries] All these points are located in both wrists and ankles.
      Palms/Soles:

      http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.2304961665160.2103840.1282822997&type=1&l=0a6bb63dd0

      By virtue of regular menses cycles, girls may grow in height up to 21st birth day with aesthetically designed boobs, the study says
      [b]. Eat dry/raw coconut + jaggery, sweets and Laddu made of dry fruits daily one or two. They ensure good strength to the boobs vis-a-vis big size with aesthetic shapes. Hence, most of the Indian women don’t have the problem of small boobs.
      Detection, prevention & cure for lumps/abscesses in the breast.
      Dorsal side of Palms & soles:
      In the middle of dorsal side of Ur palm, the remote control point for the breast is given, in the maps with links published hereunder. On hard pressing by Ur thumb and middle finger, if it hurts, U may feel that U/she have/has blocked energy + toxins in the breast. If U press the surrounding area on both palms regularly three times a day and then breast cancer shall not grow further and any abscess/boil/infection gets dissolved automatically. Acupressure & Indian Natural Remedies can cure breast cancer safely & totally.

      http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a…

      Cure is available by Acupressure Techniques & Indian Natural Remedies.

      3. Regular menses with the best of Health for life? Yes, Acupressure & Natural Remedies may solve Ur problem of irregular Menses.
      ACUPRESSURE TECHNIQUES:

      Utility—Blocked energy + toxins shall be moved from all Ur internal organs to purge in the normal drainage system, i.e., urine, feces, sweat, cough, menses[ladies], vomiting and all the organs shall function upto optimal levels.

      With Ur thumb, press Ur/his/her palms and soles, wrists and ankles on both sides. Suppose pain is felt while pressing a particular point in the palm/sole, u have to press the surrounding area—just like u r pumping out air from that painful point. The blocked energy in any internal organ, be it lungs, heart, stomach, kidneys, pancreas, liver, etc., shall be released along with toxins if any. As a last point u must press middle part of each palm/sole; so that toxins, if any, shall be excreted through urine without affecting the kidneys.
      It should be done in an empty stomach or 2 hours after meals. With this, all the endocrine glands and their hormonal secretions shall be regulated. All internal organs shall function up to optimal levels. Ur entire immune system gets invigorated to produce antibodies.

      PS. If satisfied/benefited with, inform others to join ‘Yahoo Answers’ on any health problem.
      Source: ‘HEALTH IN UR HANDS’ [Vol.I & II] available in all Indian Languages all over the globe] by Dr.Devendra Vora, DSc.,MD.,FRCP.,—an octogenarian & the pioneer in Acupressure in India.

  18. QUESTION:
    What Is Ovarian Cyst And how Can You Cure It?
    Can Ovarian Cyst be cured naturally?

    • ANSWER:
      Typically, ovarian cysts are functional (not disease or cancer related) and occur as a normal process of ovulation. During the days before ovulation, a follicle grows. But at the time of expected ovulation, the follicle fails to break open and release an egg, as it is supposed to. Instead, the fluid within the follicle remains and forms a cyst.

      Functional, or physiological, ovarian cysts usually disappear within 8-12 weeks without treatment. They are relatively common, and are more common during a woman’s childbearing years (puberty to menopause). Ovarian cysts are rare after menopause.

      Functional ovarian cysts are not the same as ovarian tumors (including ovarian cancer) or cysts due to hormone-related conditions such as polycystic ovarian disease. Some non-functional ovarian cysts must be treated to go away.

      An ovarian cyst can cause pain if it pushes on nearby structures, ruptures or bleeds. Pain may also occur if the cyst is twisted or causes twisting (torsion) of the fallopian tube.

      Symptoms of ovarian cysts can include:

      * Pelvic pain – constant, dull aching
      * Pain with intercourse or pelvic pain during movement
      * Pain during bowel movements
      * Pelvic pain shortly after beginning or ending a menstrual period
      * Abnormal uterine bleeding (change from normal menstrual pattern)
      * Longer than usual menstrual cycle
      * Shorter than usual menstrual cycle
      * Absent menstruation
      * Irregular menstruation
      * Abdominal bloating or swelling

      Often no symptoms are noted and ovarian cysts are found only be routine examinations. Usually birth control pills may be prescribed to help establish normal cycles and decrease the development of functional ovarian cysts.

      Simple ovarian cysts that are larger than 5-10 centimetres and complex ovarian cysts that persist should and will usually be surgically removed via laparoscopy (minimal invasive surgery).

      I would recommend that if you think you have an ovarian cyst that you consult with your doctor/gyno about this and ask them to answer any questions or concerns you may have.

      I have suffered from many bilateral ovarian cysts over the past 11 years and have surgery 2 times to have them removed (it wasn’t anything too serious).

      I hope this helps to answer your question. Good luck :)

  19. QUESTION:
    I have a pelvic mass which measures 24 cm. How long must I have had it?
    Dr. described it as most likely being a ovarian cyst. I am 67 years old, and went through menopause many years ago. How long ago must this have developed to grow to this size? Dr. says it is fluid filled, and would appear to be like a bunch of grapes. How likely is this to be cancerous?

    • ANSWER:
      There is no way of knowing how long it has been growing, but it is very large. Cysts can grow quickly. If it is not a complex cyst it is not cancer.

  20. QUESTION:
    I missed my period by a week but pregnancy tests come back negative….What could be wrong with me?
    I am 25 and have always had a very regular period. The most my period has ever been off is about 2 days other than that it is very timely. I have had nothing out of the ordinary taking place in my life this past month (so no extra stress, illness, etc.). I have never missed a period before. I have taken two pregnancy tests this week (one earlier right after my missed period and one today-a week after) and both came back negative. I used the First Response test both times. Could I possilby be pregnant and the test is not registering enough Hcg or what else could be wrong? I have had one ovarian cyst in my life a couple years ago that I had removed. I am not on any contraceptives. I am nervous not because I don’t want to have a child but because of what else could possibly be wrong. Any ideas?

    • ANSWER:
      If the test was negative chances are you are not pregnant. I’d recommend a another test in about a week just to be on the safe side.There are 10 major reasons a period can be late or even missed that I have listed below (of course based on your age you can dismiss some of them)

      Also on a personal and professional note: because you are not using contraceptives and the possiblity for getting pregnant is there. Please consider taking and reading up on Folic Acid. Women who are or plan on becoming pregnant need plenty of folic acid. I have a very dear friend who’s child has spina bifida due to lack of folic acid and my sister-in-law lost her child because of it.

      Stress
      Stress can affect many things in our lives, including our periods. Sometimes we’re so stressed out that our body produces hormones that halt our bleeding. Working with your doctor or midwife can help you figure out what you need to do to relax and get back on schedule.

      Illness
      A sudden, short illness or even a longer illness can cause your periods to be delayed.

      Change in Schedules
      Changing schedules can really throw off your body clock. This is particularly true if you go from days to nights at work or vice versa.

      Change in Medications
      Perhaps you’re trying a new medication and a delayed or absent period is the cause. Be sure to talk to your doctor or midwife about this side effect. It is very common with some methods of birth control.

      Being Overweight
      Carrying around too much weight can hormonally shift your cycles and even stop them. Most women will see a return to normal cycles and fertility with the loss of some weight.

      Being Underweight
      If you do not have enough body fat you will not have regular periods, sometimes you can eve cause your periods to stop all together. This is called amenorrhea. Typically a weight gain will help you have your periods return. This is a frequent cause of a missed period in women who work out to an extreme or are professional athletes.

      Miscalculation
      The menstrual cycle varies from woman to woman. While we say that the average menstrual cycle is 28 days long, that is not true for everyone. Sometimes our period is believed to be late when in all actuality we have simply miss calculated. If you have irregular menstrual cycles, but know when you ovulate, look for your period about two weeks after you ovulate. That may help you keep an easier track of your periods.

      Peri-Menopause
      Peri-menopause is the period of time where you are transitioning from reproductive age to a non-reproductive age. Your periods may be lighter, heavier, more frequent or less frequent – but mostly just not normal. If you do not wish to get pregnant, be sure to continue to use birth control because you are likely to still be fertile at least some of the time.

      Menopause
      Menopause is when you have reached the point in your life where you will no longer ovulate or menstruate. Menopause can be a natural life event or may happen surgically through hysterectomy or through chemical such as chemotherapies.

      Pregnancy
      Finally! Yes, your missed period might be because you’re pregnant! A simple pregnancy test can usually help you determine if you have missed your period because you are pregnant. The urine pregnancy tests and blood pregnancy tests look for the hormone hCG.

  21. QUESTION:
    How would a doctor get rid of my cysts?
    I have an apt. tomorow, Ultrasound today, I think I have some cysts (side pains, light period) I had them when I was younger but they always seemed to fix themselves, so I’m not sure what the doctor will do….Anybody have any experience?

    • ANSWER:
      Typically, ovarian cysts are functional (not disease related) and disappear on their own. During the days preceding ovulation, a follicle grows. At the time of expected ovulation, the follicle fails to rupture and release an egg. Instead of being reabsorbed, the fluid within the follicle persists and forms a cyst. Functional cysts usually disappear within 60 days without treatment and are relatively common. They occur most often during childbearing years (puberty to menopause), but may occur at any time. You can read more about ovarian cysts here

      http://www.4woman.gov/faq/ovarian_cysts.htm

      If it is a functional cyst, these usually disappear within 60 days without treatment and are relatively common.

  22. QUESTION:
    What could be the cause of 3 missed periods and 3 negative tests?
    I’m 19. My last period was 4 months ago. I keep feeling like it’s going to come but it doesn’t. I’ve taken 3 tests so far and they all come back negative. I don’t have any pregnancy symptoms. The only other symptoms I can think of is that my bm (bowel movements) have been irregular since my last period and my acne has become really bad. I’m really hoping it’s not premature menopause. Please help.

    • ANSWER:
      Hi, here are some facts about irregular menstrual cycles. I hope this helps you to answer a few of your questions. Take care.
      Cycles between 23–35 days are very common. A woman may get her period only one to four times a year. Or she might have periods that occur two to three times in a month and involve spotting or extremely heavy flow. Alternatively, she may have heavy episodes of bleeding every two to three months. Irregular periods are simply what is irregular for you.

      For the most part, we don’t worry at the clinic about a missed period or two over the course of a year. More variation than that may indicate to us the beginning of perimenopause or a disruption of the natural chain of hormonal events that controls menstruation. A wide variety of factors can be responsible for irregular periods, among them:

      Significant weight gain or loss
      Over-exercise
      Poor nutrition (or a diet too high in carbohydrates)
      Smoking
      Drug use
      Caffeine
      Excessive alcohol use (interfering with how the liver metabolizes estrogen and progesterone)
      Eating disorders
      Increased stress
      Polycystic ovarian syndrome/estrogen dominance
      Uterine abnormalities (fibroids/cysts/polyps/endometriosis)
      Hormonal imbalance related to perimenopause
      Medications
      Chemotherapy
      Recent childbirth, miscarriage, or D&C
      Breastfeeding

      As you can see, there are many different ways a woman can be irregular for as many different reasons, and it can be very confusing when it happens.

      http://www.womentowomen.com/menstruation…

  23. QUESTION:
    Can you start menopause in your 20s?
    My 21 year old daughter has irregular periods and hot flashes…could it be menopause?

    • ANSWER:
      yes you can…. take her to the doctor asap. she may not be ovulating correctly, she may have ovarian cysts, or polycystic ovarian syndrome. go to the doctor please!

  24. QUESTION:
    alternative medication: What fruit, vegetables, and foods inhibit estrogen absorption?
    I have found a list of fruit, vegetables, and foods that inhibit estrogen absorption such as broccoli, corn, grapes, white rice, white floor, and so on.
    Does it have some implications to be used as an alternative medicine, for example can we call them foods that women should not eat or avoid consumption them in large amount during menopause or not?

    • ANSWER:
      Estrogen Inhibiting Foods

      If you are suffering from breast cancer, PMS, fibroids, ovarian cysts, and other situations that estrogen might exacerbate, the following estrogen inhibiting foods might be of interest to you.
      Berries
      Broccoli
      Buckwheat
      Cabbage
      Citrus Foods
      Corn
      Figs
      Fruits (except apples, cherries, dates, pomegranates)
      Grapes
      Green beans
      Melons
      Millet
      Onions
      Pears
      Pineapples
      Squashes
      Tapioca
      White rice
      White flour

  25. QUESTION:
    What would cause cramping resembling mentrual cramps but you are not on your cycle and small traces of blood.?
    I have been urinating a lot and having blood in my urine and also have an ovarian complex cyst. I guess I’m not so sure where it is coming from but I do know it hurts. Anyone ever dealt with this?

    • ANSWER:
      I would go and see a doctor about that one. It doesn’t necessarily have to be anything bad like cancer, it could be a fibroid which can cause blood inbetween periods and frequent urination. Most fibroids are just left alone and will shrink after menopause but if they are being troublesome you may want to get something done about it.

      You could also have a kidney infection. There are so many things it could be and the sooner you see a doctor the sooner you get it sorted out.


ovarian cysts after menopause

Ovarian Cyst Rupture And Shaking

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    do you think heavy activity could shake a ovarian cyst to disburse?
    i havent had a period since september,and just 3 weeks ago i started a daycare job and i have done alot of strenous activity.my ovary with the cyst is cramping and i feel like it almost wants to become a period. i just dont know. what do you think is happening?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, strenous activity can cause your ovarian cyst to rupture, especially if your ovarian cyst is larger than 4cm.

      I have had bilateral ovarian cysts for over 11 years and whenver I have had a cyst larger than 4cm I have been advised by my doctor and gynaecologist to not have sexual intercourse or do any strenous activity as it can cause a large ovarian cyst to rupture.

      I would recommend that you consult with your doctor/gynaecologist about this and to see what they say.

      Good luck :)

  2. QUESTION:
    How can i get a hamster help ive only got 3 days?
    Its my birthday on sunday and i want a hamster i always have wanted one since i was 7. My parents have said no because they say we have got to many pets (only 3 cats and a goldfish). I havent been to school since november due to my IBS pain. But i really want a hamster i have been nice to everone, helping round the house, being responsible and i have made a powerpoint now what do i do?

    • ANSWER:
      Hamsters are a lot of work. How old are you? I got my first hamster when I was 14 and it was fun…. until she got Wet Tail. It is a fatal disease hamsters can get.

      They can get a lot of things that they could die from such as the following.

      Blood in Urine: Bladder & Kidney Infection • Aspergillis Fungus
      Diarrhea: Wet Tail • Intussusception • Aspergillis Fungus
      Breathing Heavy: Colds & Influenza • Aspergillis Fungus
      Broken Limb: Broken Limb
      Bulging Anus: Constipation • Intussusception • Rectal Prolapse
      Closed Eye(s): Impacted Pouch • Irritated Eyes
      Constipation: Endoparasites
      Crusty Lesions in ears, face, feet: Ear Mites
      Cuts & Bites Abscesses • Cuts & Bites
      Diabetes: Diabetes
      Dragging Hind Quarters: Broken Limb • Cage Paralysis • Hind Limb Paralysis
      Dry Scaly Skin: Demodicosis • Mange • Mites • Ringworm • Sarcoptic Mange
      Eating Young: Cannibalism
      Eggs in Feces: Endoparasites
      Excessive Drinking: Bladder & Kidney Infection • Diabetes
      Extreme Diarrhea: Tyzzer’s Disease • Wet Tail
      Eye Rupture: Eye Prolapse
      Facial Swelling: Dental Caries • Impacted Pouch
      Hair Loss: Hair Loss • Mange • Mites • Ringworm
      Head Tilt: Ear Infection • Strokes
      Infertility: Infertility
      Lethargy: Colds & Influenza • Tyzzer’s Disease • Wet Tail • Aspergillis Fungus
      Lifeless: Heat Stroke • Hibernation • Shock • Strokes
      Long Nails: Overgrown Nails
      Loose Droppings: Antibiotic Induced Diarrhea • Diarrhea
      Loss of Balance: Ear Infection • Strokes
      Lump: Abscesses • Cancer & Tumors • Impacted Cheek Pouch • Testicular tumors
      Overgrown Teeth: Overgrown Teeth
      Paralysis: Cage Paralysis • Strokes
      Runny Nose: Colds & Influenza
      Salivation: Dental Caries
      Scratching: Allergies • Fleas • Mange • Mites
      Shaking/Trembling: Diabetes • Heat Stroke • Hibernation • Stroke
      Sneezing: Allergies • Colds & Influenza
      Swollen Abdomen: Constipation
      Swollen Eye: Glaucoma
      Tires Easily: Strokes
      Unable to have Babies: Dystocia
      Watery Eyes: Allergies • Colds & Influenza • Irritated Eyes
      White Film on Eye: Cataracts
      Weight Loss: Diabetes • Endoparasites • Tyzzer’s Disease
      Wet “Bottom”: Antibiotic Induced Diarrhea • Diarrhea • Wet Tail
      Wheezing: Allergies • Colds & Influenza
      Vaginal Bleeding: Dystocia • Ovarian Cysts

      They only live for about 1-2 years if your lucky.

      If you do get a hamster. You need a wheel, water bottle, food dish, bedding, (NOT NEWSPAPER) chew toys, house, ect. I would suggest putting him/her in a 10 gallon aquarium.

      Also I would suggest a Syrian hamster. That includes Teddy Bear, Fancy, Black Bear, Golden Hamsters.

  3. QUESTION:
    My leg has a tremor, what is it?
    I have gone to my PCP and a Neurologist. I’ve had MRI’s, nerve conduction test and no answers. My right leg shakes if I’m on my tip toes, anxious, pressing on the gas pedal or the brakes. My anxiety level is high and my eye twitches every once in a while. Is it all in my head. The only thing my doctor said was that there is slight change in the Myelin tissue. Any thoughts?

    • ANSWER:
      have been having similar problems. was diagnosed with peripheral neuropathy. Given seizure medication.
      make them keep checking. it probably isn’t “all in your head”.

      Once was having pelvic pain. went to doctor for 2 years. told me “it was in my head”. ended up being an ovarian cyst that ruptured and almost killed me. made sure to go and see the doctor afterwards to let him know that it was real!!!!

  4. QUESTION:
    Ruptured ovarian cyst??
    I was feeling bad for about a month but the last week I was feeling actually sick. I went to the doctor and they told me I had an ovarian cyst that had ruptured. I didn’t feel any pain at all. I was just nauseous and would wake up in uncontrollable shakes. Should there have been pain? I know everyone is different but this is the top symptom. How long will my nausea last?

    • ANSWER:
      No, there shouldnt have been any pain,since ruptured ovarian cysts often dont hurt.
      Your nausea will last for 3-4 days…
  5. QUESTION:
    Ovarian cyst rupture?
    So wednesday night, I’m pretty sure I had a cyst rupture. I had INTENSE pain all over my pelvis, Shaking, Couldn’t breathe. And ever since i’ve been very nauseous and sore. I’m still getting pain, But yesterday I went and had an ultrasound and they said everything looks good and It looks like I’m getting my period sometime soon. I’ve been on depo for 2 years and switched to mirena a month ago and still havent gotten my period. Any thoughts or advice would be Greatly appreciated.

    • ANSWER:
  6. QUESTION:
    Help! I don’t know what’s causing this pain… ?
    At the moment I’m experiencing a pain in my lower right abdomen, I’ve had this pain before and it was an ovarian cyst. I’m trying to determine if it’s my appendix or an ovarian cyst like last time. I wanted to know if the pain of appendicitis so unbearable that I would not be able to tolerate it? If it’s merely the abdominal pain is it unlikely it’s my appendix? And any ideas to help the pain?

    • ANSWER:
      Abdominal pain can be many things, you should get it checked by a doctor. I found the following under prevention.com symptom checker. However as I said it can be other things, and the best thing to do is go to a doctor.

      Good Luck and Get Well

      The symptoms of appendicitis vary. It can be hard to diagnose appendicitis in young children, the elderly, and women of childbearing age.

      Typically, the first symptom is pain around your belly button. (See: abdominal pain.) The pain may be vague at first, but becomes increasingly sharp and severe. You may have reduced appetite, nausea, vomiting, and a low-grade fever.

      As the inflammation in the appendix increases, the pain tends to move into your right lower abdomen and focuses directly above the appendix at a place called McBurney’s point.

      If the appendix ruptures, the pain may lessen briefly and you may feel better. However, once the lining of the abdominal cavity becomes inflammed and infected (a condition called peritonitis), the pain worsens and you become sicker.

      Abdominal pain may be worse when walking or coughing. You may prefer to lie still because sudden movement causes pain.

      Later symptoms include:

      * Chills
      * Constipation
      * Diarrhea
      * Fever
      * Loss of appetite
      * Nausea
      * Shaking
      * Vomiting

  7. QUESTION:
    Ovarian Cyst Rupture Excessive Sleeping?
    A month ago I started having a dull ache in my pelvic area on the right side the pain was minimal so I didn’t give it much thought but three weeks later the pain increased and I had difficulty walking or trying to sit. So I went to my family doctor and she said it was an ovarian cyst and told me if the pain persisted for a few more days to get an ultrasound done. The pain decreased some after three days so I decided against the ultrasound. Until a week later (nine days ago) I felt like I was being poked in my belly button it was an odd sensation I didn’t think it was related though. The next night I felt like I was being stabbed in my right ovary and the pain went all the way to my back I was shaking, nauseated and I couldn’t walk across my living room without a lot of pain. Even trying to lay down was bad but once I was laying down and still it would calm down until I would move. I also had rectal pain my arm broke out into a rash (I don’t know what was up with that!) That night I slept for almost 15 hours. When I woke up I googled ovarian cyst and I read up on what the symptoms are of a ruptured cyst and it sounded like what I went through so I set up an appointment for the ultrasound for that day and called my doctor ASAP. She said it sounded like it had burst and told me to proceed with the appt and she would let me know the results. While I was getting the ultrasound I felt a shooting pain go up my abdomen. It was a late appt on a Friday so I didn’t get the results until Monday afternoon and they said that I had some gas over my right ovary so they couldn’t see it at all. I only had the pelvic sonagram not the transvaginal. I know this pain was NOT gas! and I have had this pain for 5 weeks. I told my doctor I was still experiencing pain although not as bad as that one night and that I had been sleeping a lot. Also, my lower back and right leg were hurting really bad for several days after that episode. All of last week I fell asleep as soon as I got home from work I have an uncontrolable tiredness and when Friday came around I slept for 14 1/2 hours then the next night I fell asleep at 10pm. I would have slept longer but my sister kept waking me up telling me to do my homework (I go to college once a week after work). I still feel exhausted…my doctor suggested I go to an obgyn but I feel uncomfortable going to one. Any advice?

    • ANSWER:
      inflamed kidneys from diabetes? avoid sugar. diabetes causes fatigue.
  8. QUESTION:
    I had an Ovarian Cyst Rupture?
    I’ve had them before but the last few weeks I’ve started having ovarian cyst pain again and tonight I was sitting down doing nothing when all of the sudden my right ovary started hurting and within a minute I felt excruciating stabbing pains in my ovary, uterus and rectum I could barely walk to get to my car and someone had to drive me home it was so intense I thought about going to the ER. I have a relative that’s a nurse so I had them check my blood pressure and it was elevated (I didn’t go to the hospital because I know if your blood pressure is low its a sign of internal bleeding) when this happened to me before when I had one rupture two years ago it was painful but not this bad! Also, I was shaking and groaning from the pain. The pain has decreased but it still hurts some I really don’t want to go to the hospital because I can’t afford to and I don’t have insurance. I didn’t go the the ER with the first cyst I just went to my gyno the next day but this is the weekend I can’t go till monday. Is it ok to wait that long to see a doctor?

    • ANSWER:
      Call your gyn now to get advice on how to proceed. Most offices are connected to an answering service for after hours emergencies. You leave your name, describe your symptoms and how long you’ve had them and give a call-back number. You should get a return call within an hour or so with instructions on what to do. If you are told to go to the E/R, then go.
  9. QUESTION:
    Ovarian Cyst RUPTURED Months Ago…?
    I had a cyst rupture about 10 months ago. Beforehand I had an appt set up to see my doctor about a possible cyst because I was in so much pain I could hardly walk but before I went it ruptured. I had a sonogram done afterwards and they didn’t see any problems so the doctor sent me on my way. When it ruptured I had extreme pain I couldn’t walk I had to lay still, nausea, shaking, chills, rectal pain, lower back pain and sharp pain from my right ovary going up to my naval. For a month after that I slept all the time I could not get enough sleep and had soreness in my right ovary. Ever since that happened I have always had some minor pain in that area I just wondered if that is normal like it damaged me? I don’t notice it all the time but if I move or stand up I feel it. Well today I was sitting with my right leg on the couch with my knee under my chin and when I moved my leg to the ground I gasped because it hurt in my right ovary. I don’t think its a new cyst because the pain never fully went away after the rupture but it alarmed me because today it hurt more than usual. Has anyone had this happen before? Is it just damage? When I saw my gyno she didn’t tell me much about the rupture or treat me for it or even tell me I needed a follow up appt. She said that I did have a cyst rupture by my symptoms though. I am thinking about scheduling an appt with a different gyno but before I do that I was just curious if anyone knows anything about this?

    • ANSWER:
      sometimes i am in extreme pain where my right ovary is i cant do anything. it’s uncomfortable to lay down, i get nausea. my gyno thinks i have cyst but i had an ultrasound and they said i have no cyst. ive been going through this for about 4 years back and forth every time i leave the doctors i have more questions then when i went it. I hope you have better luck finding out then i did
  10. QUESTION:
    Everyone at a loss.. feel like giving up, anyone have ideas?
    It has now been 4 months since my abdominal pain started.. and no-one has a single clue to why, and what is causing it. I went to see my surgeon on Thursday and he admitted that all though all my tests are coming back clear, he still has no idea what is wrong.. However, I have now been referred to a gastroentologist, to where they are planning to look further and possibly progress with further testing.

    Tests I’ve had done:

    X-rays
    Ultrasound scans
    MRI
    Blood tests – (once came back showing a possible iron deficiency and elevated white blood cells)
    Urine samples

    Possible causes crossed off:

    Appendicitis (been questioned at at least 6-7 times)
    Gall stones
    Gall bladder problems
    Ovarian cysts
    Ruptured ovarian cysts
    Kidney problems
    IBS
    Crohn’s disease

    Symptoms I’ve had

    All together; my lower right abdomen is hard, swollen, extremely tender and very painful to pressure. I’m extremely nauseous, having to breathe shallow, have sharp stabbing pains which have moved to 2/3 of the way between my navel and right hip bone, above my navel, and radiating to my right lower back. I’m often severely shaking and extremely cold, my temp is going up and down, I’m having cold sweats, extremely restless and can’t lay flat on my back or on my right side, this worsens the pain, as does drinking, eating, coughing, sneezing, walking, raising my right leg, bending, or over-working, heavy lifting etc…
    gastroentologist

    I’m a 17 year old female, and this is absolutely killing me. I’m having regular attacks constantly, I’ve lost a lot of weight too.. where half the time I don’t eat :/

    The surgeon said there is a chance of it being a rare condition.. but as to what that is..he doesn’t know. Any have any ideas? Because I’m questioning on giving up right now..

    Thanks.
    No-one has even questioned or considered endometriosis.. but I’ll be sure to check it out now. They’ve considered all as I’ve mentioned but that is all.. They are practically giving up, and passing me on from one person to the next, and it’s so painful, yet this is the first good thing they’ve actually decided to do…

    • ANSWER:
      Those sounds like textbook symptoms of endometriosis. They can’t diagnose endo except by laparoscopic surgery–it doesn’t show up on ultrasounds. Have you seen a gynecologist? A good one? Google “endometriosis” and the name of where you live. Maybe you can find an expert in it and then they can give you their opinion. Did no one ever suggest it before?
  11. QUESTION:
    Is it worth insisting for?
    I’ve had abdominal pain now for around5 months or so. I’ve had X-rays, Ultrasounds, an MRI scan, blood and urine tests, and all is coming back negative and fine. Though, the pain is only worsening. The pain has had me to the point where I’ve been rolling around crying in pain, holding my stomach. It’s woken me up in the nights, where I’ve suddenly jumped up holding my stomach, and again, crying in pain.

    I’m clueless as to what it is, and the hospital is steadily giving up any sign of even caring. The pain recently came on after weeks of being settled, and to the point where I even thought it had gone. It began as a cramp in my upper abdomen and became sharp and painful to touch over a few hours. Then a few hours afterwards, it steadily moved to my lower right abdomen where it has stayed. The pain is radiating to my mid-back, lower back, right side and around my right rib cage where I’m having sharp pains.

    I stayed in last Wednesday with suspected appendicitis. I was flushed, shivering/shaking, holding my stomach and led still and tearful with the pain. I was told I was to have a Laparoscopy and possible Appendesectomy, where they cancelled for the 2nd time and sent me home saying I was fine. Though this has been going on for months, and that morning I was rolling about consistently for 6 hours crying with lower right stomach pain.

    I was scheduled for a V.I.P scan, and told it was one I haven’t had before. I ended up having my 4th or 5th Ultrasound scan of my pelvic area, where there isn’t any pain or problems. I’ve had other pelvic scans before and they found nothing, so why did they say it was a scan I haven’t had before, but had several times before? And they know it too.

    I’m so confused, we were advised by severeal to insist on having a camera inserted through my stomach, as for the past 5 months, they’ve said it’s one thing, settled on it.. then said no, and said it was comething else? They’re constantly second guessing everything.. I’ve been told it’s appendicitis, ovarian cysts, ruptured ovarian cysts, IBS, gallstones, gall bladder problems, appendicitis, appendicitis and more appendicitis, mid-cycle pain, and a few other things, but every time they’ve said yes, then changed their minds.. I’m in absolute agony, but they just keep saying I’m fine and nothing is wrong, yet I’ve collapsed a few times from this, had breathing difficulties because of the pain, and been taken to hospital around 7/8 times.. and scheduled for 2 operations to be cancelled at the last minute..

    Is it worth insisting on a laproscopic surgery? I’m in college too studying horse care, so I’m failing the practical side of my education because of all this.. Is it worth it?

    Thanks and sorry it is so long!
    I don’t have that… it’s nothing to do with muscles.. as you’ve mentioned it like 100000000000 times before. It’s not that :)

    • ANSWER:
  12. QUESTION:
    Stabbing right side pain and more symptoms…..?
    Okay, i will start off listing my symptoms, and then i will give a little more information about myself and what i have suspected. I will be going to a Dr., but i this has been driving me crazy and i want to see other people’s ideas of what it could be.
    Symptoms:
    -Sharp pain at the very bottom of my right side, like near my hip bone. It is extremely sharp and it sometimes moves to the bottom of my stomach. The pain seems to get worse if i lay on my stomach or on my right side. it also gets worse if i have been sleeping, and my legs are curled up to me, when i straighten them, it is an extremely sharp pain.(That feeling only happens on the mornings i wake up with this pain, not every day)
    -Last week when i had this pain i started dripping sweat and shaking, i also got very hot(which had never happened before and hasn’t happened again)
    -Nausea(Again, that happened last week, but not this time and not the time before)
    -When i lay down, i hear my stomach making a lot of crazy grumbling noises
    -Gassy and it seems to make me go number two a lot(gross, sorry)
    -a dull leg pain(i am not sure if it is associated with this or if it is just a coincidence that i have this side pain at the same time)The dull pain is at the top of my right leg, where your thigh bones meet your torso. It isn’t a bad pain, it actually feels like there is a bone out of place and it just needs to crack to feel better.

    I wake up with this sharp pain, it is really bad when i first get it, and throughout the day, it starts getting better. It doesn’t necessarily happen in the morning, because today i woke up around 9 and when i was completely fine, went to church, came home and ate breakfast, and i took a nap. When i woke up from the nap, around 3pm, is when I got the pain. I will end up having a dull pain in the same area for a random amount of days after, sometimes 2 days, sometimes about 5 days after the initial pain. The pain happened about a month ago, and it was really bad for one day, and it ended up going away completely a week later. I get the pain when i wake up. It never happens in the middle of the day or night, i usually am in bed and i feel it when i wake up. It starts out as a very sharp, stabbing pain in my side, hurting worse when bending over, when my right leg goes down the steps, etc . I have this pain today, when i woke up i got it, i had it last week, and i had it about 2-3 weeks before that. Last week it was the worse it had ever been.
    At first, i thought maybe an ovarian cyst had ruptured because of the location of the pain, and because i had been diagnosed with ovarian cysts quite a few years ago(i am not even sure if i still have them, so i was just guessing). I looked it up on the internet, and i had some of the symptoms, but not many, and there was no blood at all. My mom said maybe it was gastritis, my dad thought maybe appendix. Last week when it was really bad, i was in so much pain that i had never felt before, i was going to go to the ER. I ended up not going because i started feeling better and i figured i could just go to a stomach doctor instead of dealing with the chaos in the ER. I have tried taking Tylenol, which helps the dull pain but not when the pain is sharp and stabbing. I also tried thinking that maybe it still was a cyst issue, and i took extra strength Midol, which eased up the dull pain again, but doesn’t help the sharp pain at all.
    So, since i haven’t seen my doctor yet, what does everybody think that this could be? It has been driving me mad, just trying to find an idea of what it could be.
    Thank you!!

    • ANSWER:
      hi, i have went through the same thing, i actually just had an xray and trannsvaginal ultrasound, i thouht it was a kidney infection, then goal stones trying to pass, nope, it was a cyst on my ovarie that was the size of a gulf ball, it ruptured and hurt sooooooooo bad, it camewent came went, comes to finnd out the worste part was the best part, thats how it went away, by breaking apart! scarey, now every pain i hve i think kidney disease this that. or maybe just an ovarian cyst.
  13. QUESTION:
    Was this rude of me in a full doctors office….?
    My best girlfriend had to go to the OB yesterday because she had some pain and an ovarian cyst that ruptured so I got to watch her little boy (he’s two) while she was in the exam room. She was in there for about two hours and this is the first time he has been tended to by someone other than a grandparent or his own mommy and daddy. Anyway, when we first got there the room was relatively empty and we kinda had the place to ourselves so everything was okay, but being a rowdy little boy we were making ramps for his cars out of the magazines and I was tickling him…we was squealing and making all of these happy little noises (really loud!). I tried to take him outside to pick wisteria off of the trees as not to disturb others but I’ll be damned the first cluster of wisteria I shook, a bumblebee flew out and it scared the bejaisus out of him so he wanted to go back inside so we drew hand turkeys in one of the magazines and I was making his little toy car quack like a duck…which in turn make him squeal and giggle louder. Several people commented what a good mother I was and I had to explain that he wasn’t mine but I was tending him while mommy was in getting an ultrasound…and they said I was good with kids. I’m not fond of children (although I have two of my own that I was good to) but little Dominic is my sweetheart and I just wanted to keep him from pitching a wobbler while away from his mommy.

    Was I rude letting him (well…and me too…) make a little noise while we were in there because this was the first time I had kept him all alone? I was just trying to avoid that crying “I WANT MY MOMMY” bit (I did well because he didn’t ask for mommy except for one time!) and just wondered if you would rather see and hear a child playing happily and giggling instead of screecjing and pitching a fit. He didn’t want to go outside because there were bumbleebees out there so we had no choice but to go back into the waiting room….

    Did I do the right thing?

    Because I’m hoping to be able to watch him again and wanted to get all of your input on what you would rather see…a screaming baby wanting his mommy or one giggling happily?

    We don’t have a “kid-friendly” house because of all the artifacts and antiques in here so he couldn’t stay here and there was a possibility that I may have had to drive her back. What would you have done? Everyone commented on what a good “mommy” I was but he isn’t mine….so I suppose I let the envelope get pushed a bit farther and basically…well, little Dommie did no wrong…I’m just wondering if everyone was annoyed. No one complained and he did have the whole waiting room cracking up as people started to fill the chairs.

    Does this also mean I am good with little kids after all? I always thought I had no patience but Dommie and I got along really well and I had lots of fun teaching him to do mean things too…like poke sticks in ant beds and then run fast (I was holding him when he did it and let him watch the ants for a bit and told him to always RUN RUN RUN after he did that). I also got to teach him the “look both ways” thing in the parking lot….after a few tries before the wisteria bumblebee incident….

    Was I being rude or just very attentive to by best girlfriends baby in a time of need? Dominic and I were in our own little world because I love my friend so much I wanted to make sure that her youngest was my center of attention so he would be safe and entertained as not to worry about his mommy. What’s your opinion?

    Thanks to all who answer!
    Marc C – You think I’m long winded on here….you don’t want to be at one of my “lectures” HAHAHAHA!!! Thanks for answering though. And yes, I can talk up a blue streak :) )
    As far as the magazine thing, it was a quilting magazine that had a fold out on patterns and the side we drew hand turkeys on was the blank side and a few of the subscription cards….I drew horns and a goatee on a pic of Dr. Phil and he scribbled horns and a moustache (to the best of his two year old ability) on Brad Pitt in one and I drew a big hat with a flower on it on Angelina Jolie….so we really didn’t do a lot of damage and the magazines were still readable. Dr. Phil looked scarily appropriate with horns :) )

    • ANSWER:
      What are you talking about? You’re always rude! Well, at least not to me, but that’s the way it should be. Screw everyone else!

      ;)

      -Hubby

  14. QUESTION:
    Why does Darvocet make me shake as it takes effect?
    I have Propoxyphene – N 100 w/ APAP 650 tabs (Darvocet) for “pelvic pain” caused by ovarian cysts/possible endometriosis. Dosage is one every four hours. I’ve only taken it three times. Twice in one day when a cyst ruptured in January – first one was on an empty stomach and second one was immediately after lunch – about 4 1/2 – 5 hours later. Third time was Friday night when another cyst ruptured on the way home from dinner (about 9pm). (The pain is excruciating and unmistakable – unlike any other.) Each time, I get TERRIBLE shakes/tremors/whatever you want to call them as it gets into my system. I can only compare it to end-stage Parkinson’s shakes – complete with involuntary “jerks” of 5-6″. They increase in severity as the Darv gets more into my system, but then they taper off to nothing as it takes effect – leaving me (almost) comfortably numb. (I can at least breathe again and stop crying.) I texted my doc Friday night and he didn’t seem concerned (unless he just missed that part), so I assume it can’t be too terribly uncommon. But WHY??? The only thing I can find on the ‘net about Darvocet and shakes is regarding withdrawal symptoms.

    Also, about an hour after taking the second one that January day, after the shakes stopped and the med was in my system good, I ended up throwing up. (Just in case that plays in here anywhere.) I didn’t get nauseous or anything Friday (after dinner) nor with the first one in January (on an empty stomach).

    Finally, I’ve had a low-grade fever (99.5-100.3) since Saturday morning – possibly before. Presumably because of the rupture, but mentioned here just in case. I know pain can elevate your temp.

    I am five foot and about 96lbs if that matters any. Always kinda scares me when doc gives me same dosage and he would for someone 6’7″ and 300lbs. But in this case, if the dose was any smaller, I don’t think it would help.
    Hey – guess what?? Talked to my doc about it today and he’s never heard of it causing shakes either! Go figure. Why does it always have to happen to me?

    • ANSWER:
      Your tremors appear to be seizures caused by an “overdose” of Darvocet. Apparently the dosage is too high and that is something that your doctor should have taken into consideration if he happened to notice that you were not a 300# woman. But it isn’t that common a symptom.

      The nausea and vomiting are also side effects as you already know. I doubt if the low grade fever itself could cause the problem but since you apparently have an infection as a result of a ruptured cyst.

      http://www.rupturedovariancyst.com/What_are_the_Symptoms_of_a_Ruptured_Ovarian_Cyst.html

      You can get better detail at the site below – but unlike the drugstore.come, I don’t see seizures listed. You will see it at the Wrong Diagnosis site as Convulsions.

      http://www.rxlist.com/darvocet-n-drug.htm

      http://www.wrongdiagnosis.com/d/darvocet_overdose/symptoms.htm#symptom_list

      Question: has your doctor already ordered a laparoscopy to rule out endometriosis? Of course the cysts can develop as a result of endometriosis.

      You have a lot of pain. It is time for your doctor to listen to you. You may need to decide which options are open to you so that you have an idea of your next treatment step. That might help your next communication with your doctor. Or ask him what he suggests but be aware of your options first.

  15. QUESTION:
    I need some help for a 10 week old kitten please!?
    I have a kitten who was 10 weeks old yesterday. He has been sick so I took him to the vet. It seemed like merely a cold so they gave me antibiotics, he has been wormed, and nasal spray and eye drops are also being administered. After we almost lost a kitten to anemia and she had to have a blood transfusion, I called the vet back and asked about Enfamil Poly-Vi-Sol drops with iron. She said that was a great idea so I have been giving those as well.I have also been keeping him in a room with a humidifier and am keeping the eyes and nose clean, but he just doesnt seem to be able to shake it! He eats like a horse but he is still the size of a 3 week old kitten. I got KMR and have been giving that to him to try and make him gain weight. I don’t want to lose my little tuxedo baby is there anything more I can do? If this is not a cold, what else could it be? I love the vet, but I have been to human doctors in my city that have told me I was constipated when I had 2 ovarian cysts that had ruptured so I dont necessarily trust them. I just want to know what other people think it is a what the best thing to do it. Thank you

    • ANSWER:
      Just keep following your vets advice, and as for the size issue your kitten might not grow as fast as other kittens. I have a full grown adult cat that is the size of a 4month old kitten.

      As long as your kitten is socialing and feeding well – i wouldnt be overerly concerned.

      Your kitten has a lovely owner, and its good to see your care so much.

  16. QUESTION:
    how to know if your dwarft hamster is sick?
    i dont think mine is but she could be tell me signs thanks

    • ANSWER:
      The following are common signs of hamster sickness and what they can be:

      Blood in Urine: Bladder & Kidney Infection • Aspergillis Fungus
      Diarrhea: Wet Tail • Intussusception • Aspergillis Fungus
      Breathing Heavy: Colds & Influenza • Aspergillis Fungus
      Broken Limb: Broken Limb
      Bulging Anus: Constipation • Intussusception • Rectal Prolapse
      Closed Eye(s): Impacted Pouch • Irritated Eyes
      Constipation: Endoparasites
      Crusty Lesions in ears, face, feet: Ear Mites
      Cuts & Bites Abscesses • Cuts & Bites
      Diabetes: Diabetes
      Dragging Hind Quarters: Broken Limb • Cage Paralysis • Hind Limb Paralysis
      Dry Scaly Skin: Demodicosis • Mange • Mites • Ringworm • Sarcoptic Mange
      Eating Young: Cannibalism
      Eggs in Feces: Endoparasites
      Excessive Drinking: Bladder & Kidney Infection • Diabetes
      Extreme Diarrhea: Tyzzer’s Disease • Wet Tail
      Eye Rupture: Eye Prolapse
      Facial Swelling: Dental Caries • Impacted Pouch
      Hair Loss: Hair Loss • Mange • Mites • Ringworm
      Head Tilt: Ear Infection • Strokes
      Infertility: Infertility
      Lethargy: Colds & Influenza • Tyzzer’s Disease • Wet Tail • Aspergillis Fungus
      Lifeless: Heat Stroke • Hibernation • Shock • Strokes
      Long Nails: Overgrown Nails
      Loose Droppings: Antibiotic Induced Diarrhea • Diarrhea
      Loss of Balance: Ear Infection • Strokes
      Lump: Abscesses • Cancer & Tumors • Impacted Cheek Pouch • Testicular tumors
      Overgrown Teeth: Overgrown Teeth
      Paralysis: Cage Paralysis • Strokes
      Runny Nose: Colds & Influenza
      Salivation: Dental Caries
      Scratching: Allergies • Fleas • Mange • Mites
      Shaking/Trembling: Diabetes • Heat Stroke • Hibernation • Stroke
      Sneezing: Allergies • Colds & Influenza
      Swollen Abdomen: Constipation
      Swollen Eye: Glaucoma
      Tires Easily: Strokes
      Unable to have Babies: Dystocia
      Watery Eyes: Allergies • Colds & Influenza • Irritated Eyes
      White Film on Eye: Cataracts
      Weight Loss: Diabetes • Endoparasites • Tyzzer’s Disease
      Wet “Bottom”: Antibiotic Induced Diarrhea • Diarrhea • Wet Tail
      Wheezing: Allergies • Colds & Influenza
      Vaginal Bleeding: Dystocia • Ovarian Cysts

      -Hope this helps

  17. QUESTION:
    I had a miscarriage last Friday.. Kind of graphic, but I have a lot of unanswered questions.?
    I was told 8 weeks into my pregnancy that I was probably in the first stages of miscarriage. I was having pain on my left side, and the way I explained it, it felt like I had another ovarian cyst that was about to rupture. I was scheduled for an emergency ultrasound that day. The baby was only measuring at 6wks and the heart rate was too low.
    I was told to take it easy, keep taking my prenatal vitamins, and stay stress free.
    THe day after that ultrasound, I had to travel out of state for my Grandmother’s funeral. It was a very, very stressful time I was terrified something was going to happen while I was there, but thankfully nothing happened.
    Two days after I got back, I started bleeding. It started out pretty light, but the cramping was getting worse by the hour. I was told to go to the ER, so I did.. By this point, (Thursday AM) I was bleeding a bit heavier and the pain was pretty bad.
    I had another ultrasound, and was told hours later that I was still measuring at 6 wks &1 day. At this point I was too tired to cry much, I was so mad that all the doctors I talked to kept giving me false hope, telling me that a lot of times, women go on to have a perfectly fine pregnancy to term. I just knew in my heart it wasn’t going to happen for me.
    I went home Thursday after the doctor avoided the truth and told me to stay on bed rest and take it easy.
    By bedtime, I was in so much pain that I could barely breathe. I was staying at my boyfriend’s house in case something happened, I wouldn’t be alone. He went to work Friday morning very early. I stayed in bed rolling around in pain, crying, completely miserable.
    I finally got up to go to the bathroom, when it started. A lot of clots, a lot of blood. I was terrified. And alone. I called my boyfriend’s job and told him what was going on and that my mother was going to take me to the ER in about an hour or two.
    I was on the couch crying, having a panic attack when my boyfriend rushed in the door and told me to get up so we could go to the ER. I got up slowly and wobbled into the bathroom. He caught my arm and went to hug me, and as he did, I felt the blood rushing down my legs. I was *freaking* out.
    I bled everywhere. I was too scared to come out of the bathroom, and I wound up getting in the shower to rinse off before having to leave anywhere. The bleeding just wouldn’t stop.
    They took me in pretty quickly, but nobody seemed to take me seriously at the ER when I told them how much I was bleeding, until I had been laying in the hospital bed for an hour without seeing a doctor, and a nurse and phlebotomist came in to take my blood and blood pressure as I was laying down, sitting up and standing. (Every 3 minutes or so the cramping got so bad that I couldn’t breathe or move or do anything but beg someone for pain meds.. and I got nothing.)
    I asked my boyfriend to leave the room, because I knew as soon as I got up… Well, the nurse helped me up and I was crying hysterically and shaking and everything.. The floor was covered in blood. That was when there was finally a sense of urgency. The nurses had to put me back on the bed and clean me off.. They gave me two bags of saline and some morphine, which BARELY helped the pain.
    I had to have 3 pelvic exams and two ultrasounds that day, and never once did they tell me I was having a miscarriage. I knew I was having a miscarriage, but they never told me exactly what was happening.
    As I was being discharged, they told me I had a partial or incomplete miscarriage and I had a choice of going home to let the rest of it pass on it’s own, or I could take three pills to help pass the rest a little quicker.. And if the rest didn’t pass, I’d have to have a d & c. I chose to take the pills and go home with the pain meds. The only other thing I was told, was if I started bleeding as heavily as I was on Friday morning, that I would need to come back, and that I needed to have an ultrasound within a week to see if the rest of the pregnancy had passed, so I have a smaller chance of infection.
    So.. It’s been a full week. I was scheduled for a followup ultrasound yesterday, but was told that I had to reschedule for another day because I needed a “different” ultrasound.. So now I’m scheduled to go back on May 5th. I’m worried because I’m still bleeding off and on, sometimes it’s heavy, sometimes it’s dark and there isn’t much bleeding at all. As the day goes on, my cramping gets worse and worse, and by bedtime, I’m absolutely miserable.
    I know the whole process can take a few weeks, but I was under the impression that the pills they gave me would speedup the process, but by how long? Should I still be in this much pain?
    What should I be expecting? I ran out of the pain meds they gave me on day 3 and wasnt able to get more. Tylenol did nothing to help. I’m worried, I’ve known since the beginning that something wasn’t right, and now I sti

    • ANSWER:
      I know that we had two seperate things going on, I had an abortion with pills. Now please keep reading because your symptoms were the same as mine. I bled for an entire month and had severe cramps, and I eventually got an infection. The fetus was stuck in my cervix and the only way they actually knew it was up there was because I went back into the E.R after all the scheduled ultrasounds (even when they just told me to rest and that I was perfectly fine) the doctor did an exam and seen that my cervix was completely open and removed the “debri” as he called it right then and there. I am not trying to scare you, I really do not want anyone to experience what I went thru and still am going thru to this day. I was very ill due to the massive blood loss, including clots the size of an orange. The way the E.R doctor explained it to me was that I was cramping all the time because my Uterus was spasming to try to loosen the blockage and my body was retaining blood to try force it out as I stood up or moved. Please go to the E.R before an infection set in, or something else serious happens. If I did not go I would of been dead in a week if I stayed at home.
  18. QUESTION:
    How do I get a diagnosis? I am desperate.?
    I’m so desperate, I’m asking an internet forum.
    I have been sick for six months. This illness continues to get more painful and more debilitating. I have seen multiple doctors, to no avail. Is there ANYONE out there with advice? My doctors are seeming to get sick of me. My life is non-existent. I can’t leave my house. I can’t function. I am constantly in pain, all over my body.

    I am a 20 year old female. I have had digestive symptoms for months.
    I have frequent bowel movements (7+ times per day), most of which are diarrhea or extremely loose. Anti-diarrheal medications do not work; the only thing that “works” to solidify my stool is Vicodin, but this constipates me, which doesn’t help either.
    My stool contains a great deal of undigested food – vegetables (lettuce, tomato, etc), meat, grain (rice cereal, etc.).
    I have severe abdominal distension.
    I have sharp pains throughout my abdomen constantly.
    My stool is usually extremely fatty, foamy, and foul-smelling.
    Nearly every bowel movement is painful.
    I am nauseous daily. I never know if I will be able to keep down food. Accompanying food with milk seems to ease the nausea.
    My weight fluctuates extremely. My typical weight is 140 (I am 5’11″) and it drops down to 125 and back up within a week or two.
    This is accompanied by many other symptoms – joint pain, extreme fatigue, chest pain, heart palpitations, inability to control body temperature (alternating quickly between sweating and shaking with cold chills), muscle weakness, hand tremors, hypoglycemia, low blood pressure, blurred/distorted vision, memory loss, confusion, frequent urination, near-daily low-grade fevers, constant headache.

    I have seen an internist, a gastroenterologist, and a gynecologist.
    In May, I went in for surgery to remove a ruptured ovarian cyst, at which point they also noticed appendicitis and removed my appendix. The biopsy of my appendix returned somewhat normal, except they had found multiple stones and stool within the appendix, but said it seemed normal.

    During a follow-up gynecologic exam, my doctor did an ultrasound due to my abdominal distension, and saw that my large intestine was in between my uterus and my bladder.

    I have since had a colonoscopy, an endoscopy, a great deal of bloodwork (vitamin levels, ANA, CSR, RA,H.pylori, liver and kidney panels, CBC) an EKG, and a stool study to test for bacteria and parasites.

    All of these tests have come back clean/negative.

    What do I do next? My doctors are literally guessing. I’m currently taking meclizine, in the off chance that I may have an inner ear infection that they can’t see? The medicine is not helping.
    They have not given me any more medicine.
    I am completely lost, and constantly miserable. Any advice would be appreciated.

    • ANSWER:
      I’m sorry to hear all that you are going through. I don’t know if your gastroenterologist or other docs checked you out for this (doesn’t sound like they did) but I’d have a GES (gastric emptying scan) done to rule out Gastroparesis. Most of the symptoms you’ve listed are the same ones I deal with and I was diagnosed with Gastroparesis. Also, have your hormone levels checked too. If your estrogen levels are off it can cause some of the symptoms too. A possibility with your bowels is that you probably have IBS-D (irritable bowel syndrome – diarrhea dominant). I’d ask your gastroenterologist about that. I hope this info helps.

      Praying you get a diagnosis soon and feel much better soon.

  19. QUESTION:
    Ruptured Ovarian Cyst—- What can help the pain I am in agony?
    My name is Jessica I am 22 years old and suffered with PCOS since aged 13 when I got diagnosed with this. My periods have been so irregular I haven’t had a period for 6 months and no I am not pregnant because I am currently single. I have been on the Pill “Yasmin” for the past 3-4 years I take it every day with a weeks break once Ive finished that strip of pills and I have no peroid which I know is normal for somebody with PCOS.

    In the past few days its got worse I went to see my GP she was USELESS and did nothing so I made an app to see my gyn consultant who unfortunately had to cancel his clinic tonight because a woman went into labour and needed him there to deliver her baby so I saw his colleauge who was lovely.

    I ended up spending near enough 2 and a half hours in the hospital inc seeing this other gyn consultant who was fantastic very friendly I would DEFINATELY reccomend him I had an ultrasound vaginally which was painful but on it he saw a cyst had ruptured and theres a bit of fluid about.

    Of course I am in agony over this all if I keep walking around and doing things it hurts more ive tried painkillers unfortunately I can only have paracetomal because I am allergic to codiene, neurofen and ibrobufen which sucks. I have tried a hot water bottle, taking painkillers nothing has worked apparently it will settle down in a few days if not I have to go into hospital so he can put a camera down me to see what else is going on which I do not want as I was only in hospital last Friday for an ankle issue.

    Sorry its so long but I thought you should know the full story and I hope I get a period soon and all this pain will end.

    ANY advice would help greatly I am in agony the only thing that worked earlier was a hot bath the pain had gone but when I got out it was bad, layed in bed it settled down the washed my hair about an hour ago and now its really painful again

    Thank you so much to everyone who replies
    Hi Astrid,

    It is like the pain when you have appenditis but worse its a nagging pain which I cannot seem to shift I have to be careful with pain meds because I am allergic to codiene which really sucks so I can only take paracetomal. I find that hot water bottles don’t help and paracetomal only really helps at night I take it right before I go to sleep and a hot bath works me wonders the pain goes down so much but I spoke to my GYN consultant yesterday and if it doesnt get any better I am going to see him thursday evening at his clinic. I havent tried hugging a pillow I will try it though although it seems like nothing is working right about now.

    God for bid I havent had surgery I don’t really want it to be honest I had an ultrasound on Tuesday evening and the cysts havent gotton any bigger I love kids and would love to have them in the future I havent had a period for 6 months now of course I am worried that they wont return but I hope everyday that I will have one soon.

    I

    • ANSWER:
      If you start to experience severe pain (being unable to think, shaking, throwing up from the pain) I would suggest going to the hospital. Yeah, it should settle down but if it becomes unbearable those few days will be unlivable. Other than painkillers they might put you on a TENS machine (which stimulates your nerves and reduces pain) which a lot of women find helpful in your situation. Have you tried just applying pressure, like hugging a pillow to your abdomen? Because I find with severe pain that’s the only thing that helps me (I have endometriosis so can relate to your pain level).
      Until it goes away or gets lighter all you can really do is apply pressure and curl up in bed! I’m sorry, it’s awful but that’s the truth.

      Have you had surgery for your PCOS recently? Because you should really push for it if it’s been a while.

      Stay strong. Us ‘women’s health problems’ girls need to stick together!

  20. QUESTION:
    Doctors giving up, told it’s nothing?
    Had this pain for 4/5 months now, had around 6-8 surgeons, over 30 doctors, several consultants, and everyone is giving up. I’ve been told it’s appendicitis, ruptured ovarian cysts, ovarian cysts, endometriosis, IBS, mid-cycle pain, gall stones, gallbladder problems, appendicitis.. now I’m being told it’s nothing.. AGAIN. I’ve had X-Rays, Ultrasounds, MRI scan, blood tests, urine samples. Everything is coming back negative, yet the pain is worsening?

    I was taken in hospital last night with suspected appendicitis, and for the second time scheduled for a laproscopic surgery and a possible appendectomy, only to have it cancelled AGAIN, and told I don’t need it. I’m in utter agony, everything calmed down weeks ago, almost felt like it was never there, and now it feels like everything has come back with avengence, 100x worse.

    It’s the 4th day today. These past few days, the pain is steadily worsening. Sunday, I had a light cramping in my upper abdomen, slowly got worse over a few hours, that it became sharp pain, which was painful and tender to the touch. That eventually calmed down, but slowly moved over to my lower right side. These past few days, I’m struggling to eat, drink, move, because it worsens the pain dramatically, I can’t touch my lower right side, or my side, pressure on the left side causes sharp pain on my lower right side, I’ve had uncontrollable shaking and shivering, chills, headaches, nausea, slight vomiting. Doctors and surgeons agreed last night/this morning that my lower right side is extremely tender.. only to be told it’s nothing and sent home.

    I’ve had Tramadol, Paracetamol, Co-Codamol and Ibuprofen over these past few months, and nothing is working. No position is either. It’s worsening at night, though it’s pretty bad in the day, night time is hell. It takes hours of crying, holding my stomach and rolling around to even get a few minutes sleep.. only to wake back up and do it all again. My parents don’t exactly care, and constantly having a go because I keep going back in absolute pain to try and get it sorted, only to be pushed away again and told it’s nothing.

    I’ve been to hospital between 6-8 times with this, and each time, either they said they don’t have a clue what it is, it’s nothing, or say it’s appendicitis.. then send me home with a few pills that never do a thing to it. I’m now scheduled for a scan I’ve apparently haven’t had before to figure it out, I’m thinking a CT scan?

    Should I just give up? I was told I’d be seeing a gastroenterologist too a few months back.. but that never happened either.. I’m in so much pain, is there anything I can do to calm this down? Anyone had such experiences like this before? All of this has happened at the same hospital..
    Nope, haven’t had anything like that.. they said it’s no need for such things. IBS they’ve tried looking through that, but no signs of it. Everything I’ve said they’ve tried and tested for but nothings coming up, all tests are negative. But they do keep going back to appendicitis.. Someone mentioned ‘grumbling appendicitis’.. what is that?

    Ahh, right, I see. I’ve never had a Cat Scan before, so pretty nervous of that. I’m just hoping something shows up soon, because it’s starting to cripple me pain wise, and affect what I can and can’t do.. Any medication doesn’t help, I’ve had medication through drips, oral medication.. nothing. The pain is just getting worse without an end in sight.
    Ahh right now I understand, that was something mentioned by someone too.. And IBS; they said I have no symptoms for it, and such, but honestly, I have no clue. I have no problems with that side of things. Hmm, I’ll have to take a look into it, because I have to be careful in the medication I take because of bad asthma, and I end up having bad reactions to certain types of medication. But I’ll be sure to look into it. I see, is it sort of like an MRI scan in ways then?
    Ahh I understand now. And I’ve never had a colonscopy.. they said such things as like that are not needed. They did say my lower right side, is awfully tender, when it shouldn’t be. Yet they said, nothing is wrong, and walked off.

    Crohn’s disease they said I haven’t got too.. though they referred to such conclusion using one of the tests they did before. And IBS may possibly be the cause, I have no idea I’m so lost with it all. They say it’s one thing, then say no, schedule examinations/tests, ops, then say I don’t need them? They’re confusing me so much..

    I’m just wondering whether to go to a different hospital altogether? But, my current hospital has all my files since this started…

    • ANSWER:
      As mentioned before have you had a Colonoscopy? There is one disease you haven’t mentioned is Chrones Disease. Very difficult to diagnose. They might be doing a Pet Scan. A Pet Scan mainly focuses on finding Tumors in the body. Most tumors absorb sugars very rapidly. You are given an injection and then they scan the body. A tumor can be picked up because the tumor will turn red because the high sugar absorption will heat up the blood flow. Good Luck.
  21. QUESTION:
    i was told today that i may possibly have had an ovarian cyst rupture and i have a few questions ?
    i’ve been in a tremendous amount of pain in my lower left quadrant for about 5 or 6 days. i was at the dr a couple of times each with different answers. today i was sent for a pelvic ultrasound which showed fluid in my fallopian tubes and a lot of inflamation. the dr said he was assuming that i had a cyst on the ovary that burst and left behind some fluid etc…the pain is not going away at all and i’m feeling quite nauseated with it as well. they did an internal ultrasound as well as the normal one and the internal one was so painful i actually shook for about 4 hours. i had a partial hysterectomy 3 and a half years ago and have no uterus but still have the tubes and ovaries. the tech told me she never usually sees tubes on an ultrasound. i’m getting worried because the pain is just not going away. any suggestions or answers?

    • ANSWER:
      If you’re still in pain in the morning, call the doctor. It can take a few days for the cyst to totally go a way, but 7 days is really pushing the limit. (Mine took about 7 days to clear up, I was flat on the couch crying in pain) I don’t know that an ovarian cyst would cause fluid in the fallopian tubes – mine ruptured into my abdominal cavity. i was nauseated for days too.

      The least he can do is give you pain killers.

  22. QUESTION:
    Has anyone been sick/achy/feeling unwell or just not the same since they had their baby?
    My daughter turned a year old this month. The pregnancy was terrible, but all went well during labor/delivery. Since I had her I have felt like a totally different person and my doctor diagnosed me with fibromyalgia. I don’t know if this is right, though. I never have energy – not just from being a mother, it’s worse than that. I feel like I’m drugged sometimes. My body always aches, I feel nauseous half of the time and throw up a lot or feel like throwing up, inside I just feel unwell – similar to having the flu, I’ve had two functioning ovarian cysts burst (my doc told me this is normal but I’m having the symptoms again within the last 2 weeks). Early in the morning this lower abdominal ache wakes me up. It isn’t sharp pain – it’s more similar to menstrual cramps but a little different. When I wake up in the morning I feel HORRIBLE. It takes me about an hour to shake off the incredibly sick feeling all over my body. It really is like having the flu all the time – with more symptoms. I am on Protonix (for a suspected ulcer after the gall bladder test was normal) and my stomach aches are ok while taking it but when I stop it is immediate pain. I was not this person before I had her. I had my thyroid tested and it was normal. I had an ultrasound when the first cyst ruptured and all they saw was a little free fluid in my abdomen from the cyst, nothing abnormal. I get sick a lot as if my immune system is very weak. I am wondering if anyone has had a feeling of illness or achiness or exhaustion that they feel started after they gave birth or during pregnancy. I think that I was severely malnourished during the pregnancy because I threw up every day repeatedly and could barely drink water. I took two different meds to keep me from throwing up but they didn’t work at all. My body felt like I was hit by a truck when I was preggo with her. I just feel like I am totally different and that life is miserable and that I am always ill and depleted of energy. Help!

    • ANSWER:
      Thanks for your long story to understand your body condition.
      But I would like to advice in short because it is difficult for you to understand the physiology and pathology of east asian medicine.

      You need to take Boyak. Boyak means the herbal teas prescribed by the herbal doctor for general improvement of bioenergy.

      I think you need 3 boxes of herbal teas for 2 months.
      If you want to know about the treatment cases, please refer to below source.

  23. QUESTION:
    Has anyone been sick/achy/feeling unwell or just not the same since they had their baby?
    My daughter turned a year old this month. The pregnancy was terrible, but all went well during labor/delivery. Since I had her I have felt like a totally different person and my doctor diagnosed me with fibromyalgia. I don’t know if this is right, though. I never have energy – not just from being a mother, it’s worse than that. I feel like I’m drugged sometimes. My body always aches, I feel nauseous half of the time and throw up a lot or feel like throwing up, inside I just feel unwell – similar to having the flu, I’ve had two functioning ovarian cysts burst (my doc told me this is normal but I’m having the symptoms again within the last 2 weeks). Early in the morning this lower abdominal ache wakes me up. It isn’t sharp pain – it’s more similar to menstrual cramps but a little different. When I wake up in the morning I feel HORRIBLE. It takes me about an hour to shake off the incredibly sick feeling all over my body. It really is like having the flu all the time – with more symptoms. I am on Protonix (for a suspected ulcer after the gall bladder test was normal) and my stomach aches are ok while taking it but when I stop it is immediate pain. I was not this person before I had her. I had my thyroid tested and it was normal. I had an ultrasound when the first cyst ruptured and all they saw was a little free fluid in my abdomen from the cyst, nothing abnormal. I get sick a lot as if my immune system is very weak. I am wondering if anyone has had a feeling of illness or achiness or exhaustion that they feel started after they gave birth or during pregnancy. I think that I was severely malnourished during the pregnancy because I threw up every day repeatedly and could barely drink water. I took two different meds to keep me from throwing up but they didn’t work at all. My body felt like I was hit by a truck when I was preggo with her. I just feel like I am totally different and that life is miserable and that I am always ill and depleted of energy. Help!

    • ANSWER:
      I completely feel the same way.
      Everything always hurts and I’m always nauseous.
      I would sleep all day, every day if I didn’t have a 3 month old.

      But I have no idea what’s wrong with me.
      I might go pick up a pregnancy test, even though I have an IUD.

  24. QUESTION:
    pelvic pain?
    I have had a dull achy pain in my right pelvic region that goes into my lower right back for the past month give or take a little. I have a history of ovarian cyst and am hoping this is not that. I have had a cold for about a month and can’t seem to shake it, maybe they are both connected somehow. I have been getting my period regularly,this month though it only lasted for 2 days. I am on birth control to control my cyst which is why I dont think this pain is that.
    i also have very achy legs all the time. like when i get my period. im not due to have my period till Feb 19th

    • ANSWER:
      you need to see your ob/gyn. i’ve taken care of many young women who come in to the er in the middle of the night with this pain, only to have had the cyst rupture and cause them to have surgery. the birth control pills will not cause ovarian cysts to go away.
  25. QUESTION:
    Question for those with PCOS or anything with similar symptoms?
    I recently saw the dr to discuss my symptoms and had some blood work done. I wasn’t hoping to have PCOS, but hoped that at least the lab results would point us in the right direction. She tested all my hormone levels (testosterone, thyroid, etc.) and had me do a fasting glucose test. I just got all my results back and everything was completely normal. Even my blood sugar! Normally I would be thrilled, but something is very wrong with me and with these normal results, we’re back to square one. I do still have the ultra sound to do next week and then I meet with her again. I have a history of cysts rupturing, so we’ll see what that holds. So, my question is this, have any of you been diagnosed with pcos, even though lab results were normal or do any of you have another condition that has these similar symptoms?

    Symptoms
    ~Absence of periods (cycles range from 4-6 months)
    ~Extreme weight gain. (more than 50 lbs in this last year. That includes 3 months when I made a huge effort to eat very healthy and was at the gym 1hour 5-6 days a week – still gained! I even gained weight when I couldn’t eat for a week due to an allergic reaction to medication. Literally, my diet consisted of chicken broth and water and I gained 4 lbs in that 1 week.)
    ~Facial and body hair (I am growing actual whiskers like a man, I have to shave my face at least once a week and and now starting to grow hair on my belly and back)
    ~Problems with sugar. (a half a glass of sweet tea, pop, koolaid – anything – will have me visibly shaking, jittery, weak, light headed and dizzy with in 10 minutes. Even the glucose test did this to me)
    ~my acne is worse than it was as a teen
    ~I have a good deal of pelvic pain, even when not cramping, I’m always extremely tender (to the point that it effects my sex life)
    ~My blood pressure is also now beginning to skyrocket. I’ve never had it this high before

    Regardless of what I eat or how often I exercise, these symptoms continue to get worse. And if all my levels are normal, then what could be causing these things (namely the weight gain, facial/body hair and problems with anything sugary)

    Please help!

    • ANSWER:
      Hi,
      I have PCOS but I do not have all the symptoms. I had irregular periods, every 3-5 months (once it got to as much as 7) and I went from weighing 145 pounds to 225 in about two years, even though I had been on a really strict diet and was a gym freak for about a year and a half into it.
      Like you, I’ve gotten tested for everything possible, thyroid, glucose, cortisol, etc etc etc etc etc and after doctor’s disapproving looks of me being “fat” and “not putting enough effort into the gym” and hundreds of dollars of medical bills later I finally found the gyno who is helping me. She did an ultrasound, but not the standard one pregnant women get. It’s trans-vaginal, which means they stick a, sorry for being vulgar, phallic looking thing up your vagina and there is a sensor at the tip which allows a much clearer picture of your ovaries. Sure enough, mine we full of cysts, hence, poly cystic ovarian syndrome. You normally cannot tell with a standard ultrasound.

      According to the gyno, the cysts are basically the eggs that never made it out of your ovaries. Our ovaries are supposed to let out an egg every month after it has matured, but in this case, they never fully mature, and never emerge and you do not ovulate, hence, you never get your period.

      Your sugar problems may be due to the fact that you do not metabolize insulin correctly- which is yet another symptom.

      They say there is no “cure” for PCOS but there is management. I’m currently on Metformin ( a medicine that is normally given to diabetics, but one that PCOS patients get to regulate their insulin management) and birth control (to regulate my period). I have been getting my period every month now, and I have lost a few pounds. I am not satisfied yet, but I am glad that I at least stopped gaining weight. I’m only 19..and this has prevented me from having a normal teenage experience (in terms of relationships) and has left me quite bitter, but yet optimistic at the same time.

      Best of luck.

 

ovarian cyst rupture and shaking

Ovarian Cyst Symptoms Weight Gain

Many women of childbearing age suffer with fibroids and fibrocystic breast disease. For many the condition will prohibit planning a pregnancy. Many post-menopausal women are taking estrogen replacement drugs that help control hot flashes and mood. However there are so many research studies implicating estrogen replacement with an increased risk of cancer, it hardly seems worth it to use this treatment to control hot flashes. Many post-menopausal women are surprised to learn that despite their wise refusal of estrogen replacement, they too are estrogen dominant, and this excess estrogen in fueling the growth of fibroids and fibroid cysts in the uterus and breasts. So what do you do? It you are on oral contraception or any type of hormone contraception (i.e, DeproProvera, etc.), discontinue it and use an alternative that is hormone free. If you are currently on estrogen replacement, tell your doctor that you want to discontinue it. (Later you can explore bio-identical hormone replacement with a qualified practitioner.) Avoid drugs that contain hormones such as cortisone and prednisone. Avoid hydrocortisone cream.Avoid estrogen-rich foods such as: soy products (tofu, soy yogurt, soy milk, etc.), flax seeds and flax oil, canola oil (from the rapeseed) as well as all seeds, pods, and beans. Think of every seed, pod and bean as a mini uterus ready to reproduce and consequently high in estrogen. Yes, many of these foods are famous for their nutritional value. However, for the individual with fibroids these foods will fuel the growth of the tumors. Soy in particular is everywhere in processed food products. Avoid the so-called womens herbs or herbal formulas as these contain herbs known to be high in phytoestrogens. This can be the ultimate in irony as many natural approaches to treating fibroids recommend herbs that will in the short term have a positive effect, but in the long term fuel the growth of fibroids due their high content of estrogens.Avoid herbicides and pesticides. These chemicals are known as xenoestrogens since they mimic the activity of natural estrogen. Stay away from golf courses, commercial farms, pest control sprays, fuel and solvent fumes. Always soak fruits and vegetables in a sink of water and a tablespoon of 35% food grade hydrogen peroxide or a mixture of one half vinegar and water for 20 minutes, followed by a thorough rinse. Seek out my article on identifying estrogenic foods and herbs.Metabolizing excessive estrogen is possible with a specific herbal formula developed by an oncologist with training in Chinese medicine (check below) and the use of a pure progesterone cream. Progesterone supplementation via a transdermal cream is an easy and powerful way to recover from the estrogen dominant condition that causes the growth of uterine fibroids, fibrocystic breasts and endometriosis. Progesterone quite simply puts excessive estrogen into balance. However, many formulas contain ingredients that are estrogenic in a misguided attempt to improve on pure progesterone. Read labels!Estrogen is stored in body fat. Body fat is most often the result of a lower metabolism due to a sluggish and toxic liver. Excessive estrogens are contributing factors to weight gain. When the liver fails to eliminate estrogens efficiently, the excessive estrogens stimulate fat cell production from the lower abdominal area to the knees where estrogens are more concentrated. Estrogens also bind to sodium which retains water and leads to weight gain. Chinese bitters can be helpful in detoxifying the liver and increasing the flow of bile. However, the fast track to a more functional liver can be realized by engaging in a series of liver-gallbladder flushes to remove the cholesterol pellets that clog the bilary ducts of the liver and impede the flow of bile. The easiest and most effective L-G flush uses an ozonated olive oil product, Olive Gold 03.The best natural treatments for uterine fibroid tumors address the cause and the symptoms of the problem. Fibroid tumors develop due to excessive estrogen. The fibroid tumor is the symptom and product of the cause. Since fibroids are composed of fibrin, the same material of scar tissue, taking a professional strength systemic enzyme formula will dissolve the fibroid and remove this tissue altogether over time. When combined with the hormone balancing strategy this protocol offers the best natural approach to defeating uterine fibroids once and for all.

About the Author:
And to learn more and locate the proven products, visit www.ShrinkFibroidsFast.com and receive a free 55 min. audio recording. Stuart Spangenberg, LCSW, P.A. is a licensed psychotherapist, wellness coach and host of the weekly radio show, “Solutions to Aging” on www.HTHRadio.com.

Source: http://www.articlesnatch.com/Article/Cure-Uterine-Fibroids-By-Reducing-Estrogen-And-Balancing-The-Hormones/722503

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    How do you know if you have a cyst?
    My last period was on Feb 27 and I had very light spotting on March 20th but have yet to get a period. I’ve been having some light cramping, frequent urination, minimal weight gain, back pains and sometimes my breasts feel sore. Could the symptoms be related to ovarian cysts. I’ve never had one before and my period is always on time. Any insight would be great.

    • ANSWER:
      I learned I had an ovarian cyst days after I turned 12. I hadn’t had my period yet. I did have VERY severe pain around my stomach and surrounding areas to the point where it hurt to talk and move.

      I found a website and most of what you are experiencing matches up with symptoms of an ovarian cyst. I would recommend seeing a doctor. They will probably examine you and might schedule an ultrasound to be sure.

      Here’s the website I found if you want more information.

      http://symptomsofovariancysts.net/

  2. QUESTION:
    What are some symptoms of an ovarian cyst?
    I think I might have an ovarian cyst. I had sharp pains in my side around my ovulation time, and i feel nauseous sometimes. I also have small pains when I eat. Has anyone had those symptoms with an ovarian cyst?

    • ANSWER:
      Ovulation can naturally cause women pain. Ovarian cysts can be very, very small, or they can grow to be very large. Do you ever have any pain at any other time? Ovarian cysts often cause extreme pain all the time. My friend had horrible pain all the time, but since she couldn’t afford the doctors bills, she let it go. It finally got so bad that she was rushed to the ER. They did surgery and realized that it had grown to be the size of an orange. Most women experience weight gain, fatigue nausea, and abnormal bleeding. You should go to the doctor, and they will probably watch it for a couple months to see if it is growing. If it is something other than a cyst, it is still wise to see a gyno and have it checked out.

  3. QUESTION:
    Whats the difference between an ovarian cyst and ovarian cancer?
    My sister has an ‘ovarian cyst’ 15 cm i n width….. The average cyst rarely exceeds 5 cm…… can a cyst turn into cancer?

    • ANSWER:
      Ovarian cyst is:

      An ovarian cyst is a fluid-filled sac in the ovary. Many cysts are completely normal. These are called functional cysts. They occur as a result of ovulation (the release of an egg from the ovary). Functional cysts normally shrink over time, usually in about 1 to 3 months. If you have a functional cyst, your doctor may want to check you again in 1 to 3 months to make sure the cyst has gotten smaller. In certain cases, your doctor may want you to take birth control pills so you won’t ovulate. If you don’t ovulate, you won’t form cysts.

      If you are menopausal and are not having periods, you shouldn’t form functional cysts. If you do have a cyst, your doctor will probably want you to have a sonogram so he or she can look at the cyst. What your doctor decides to do after that depends on your age, the way the cyst looks on the sonogram and if you’re having symptoms such as pain, bloating, feeling full after eating just a little, and constipation.

      Ovarian Cancer:

      Recognizing ovarian cancer symptoms

      Ovarian cancer often shows no obvious signs or symptoms until late in its development. Signs and symptoms of ovarian cancer may include:

      General abdominal discomfort and/or pain (gas, indigestion, pressure, swelling, bloating, cramps)

      Nausea, diarrhea, constipation, or frequent urination

      Loss of appetite

      Feeling of fullness even after a light meal

      Weight gain or loss with no known reason

      Abnormal bleeding from the vagina

      These symptoms may be caused by ovarian cancer or by other, less serious conditions. It is important to check with a doctor about any of these symptoms.

      To help find the cause of symptoms, a doctor evaluates a woman’s medical history. The doctor also performs a physical exam and orders diagnostic tests. Some exams and tests that may be useful are described below:

      Pelvic exam includes feeling the uterus, vagina, ovaries, fallopian tubes, bladder, and rectum to find any abnormality in their shape or size. (A Pap test, a good test for cancer of the cervix, is often done along with the pelvic exam, but it is not a reliable way to find or diagnose ovarian cancer.)

      Ultrasound refers to the use of high-frequency sound waves. These waves, which cannot be heard by humans, are aimed at the ovaries. The pattern of the echoes they produce creates a picture called a sonogram.

      CA-125 assay is a blood test used to measure the level of CA-125, a tumor marker that is often found in higher-than-normal amounts in the blood of women with ovarian cancer.

      Lower GI series, or barium enema, is a series of x-rays of the colon and rectum. The pictures are taken after the patient is given an enema with a white, chalky solution containing barium. The barium outlines the colon and rectum on the x-ray, making tumors or other abnormal areas easier to see.

      CT (or CAT) scan is a series of detailed pictures of areas inside the body created by a computer linked to an x-ray machine.

      Biopsy is the removal of tissue for examination under a microscope. A pathologist studies the tissue to make a diagnosis. To obtain the tissue, the surgeon performs a laparotomy (an operation to open the abdomen). If cancer is suspected, the surgeon performs an oophorectomy (removal of the entire ovary). This is important because, if cancer is present, removing just a sample of tissue by cutting through the outer layer of the ovary could allow cancer cells to escape and cause the disease to spread.

      If the diagnosis is ovarian cancer, the doctor will want to learn the stage (or extent) of disease. Staging is a careful attempt to find out whether the cancer has spread and, if so, to what parts of the body. Staging may involve surgery, x-rays and other imaging procedures, and lab tests. Knowing the stage of the disease helps the doctor plan treatment.

  4. QUESTION:
    Any illnesses that have the same symptoms as pregnancy?
    I am experiencing these symptoms:

    abdominal pain
    weight gain
    headaches
    nausea
    mood swings
    morning sickness

    I am 98.9% sure I am NOT pregnant, and this has been going on for almost three months now so it’s probably not pms. Can anyone help me?

    • ANSWER:
      Ovarian Cysts

  5. QUESTION:
    Natural ways of shrinking uterine fibroids and ovarian cysts?
    Today I was diagnosed with three uterine fibroids (3 cm each) and a small ovarian cyst. I don’t want to get surgery as it could be dangerous for other organs. Are there any natural ways of shrinking them?

    Thank you.

    • ANSWER:
      Fibroids are benign uterine growths. Many women have no symptoms while others experience bleeding, increased urination, bladder displacement, urine retention, constipation, infertility, miscarriage, pain during intercourse and anemia. Ovarian cysts are enlarged follicles that fail to rupture and release an egg. Women may experience general pain, disrupted periods, pain in the back and abdomen and painful intercourse. Both of these conditions are caused by imbalances in estrogen production. There are many natural treatments to deal with both of these conditions. Talk to your doctor about any natural supplements you are using.

      Herbal Treatments for Fibroids

      Herbal treatments that address bleeding often work quite quickly, but supplements that control hormone levels take about three months of use before bringing about noticeable results.

      Black cohosh controls bleeding and relieves pain; take 500 milligrams daily. Cinnamon oil has a long history of use in traditional American medicine to control bleeding fibroids. Use 10-to-15 drops every 15 minutes until the bleeding stops. Dan shen, which should only be used under professional supervision, treats congealed blood, dark red clots during menstruation, and relieves pelvic congestion. Reishi tincture alleviates pelvic inflammation. Take one tablespoon in ¼ cup of water three times daily.

      There are three traditional Chinese formulas that are commonly used to treat uterine fibroids. Take as directed on the product label.

      Augmented Rambling powder lowers estrogen levels and is most useful for women who are also suffering from painful or difficult urination. Cinnamon Twig and Poria Pill lowers estrogen levels without interfering with the menstrual cycle or causing weight gain. Four Substance Decoction treats fibroids and is especially useful for women who eat a poor diet.
      Herbal Treatments for Ovarian Cysts

      Dioscorea tincture, also known as wild yam, alleviates cramping caused by ovarian cysts. Take as directed on the label. Dong quai relieves pain resulting from this condition. Take 1,000 milligrams daily during the two-week period after menstruation and then discontinue for two weeks.

      There are several Chinese formulas used to treat ovarian cysts. Use as directed on the product label.

      Dong Quai and Peony Powder reduces estrogen levels and the formation of inflammatory substances in the tissues that line the uterus. Two Cured Decoction reduces estrogen levels. Augmented Rambling Powder and Cinnamon Twig and Poria pill, which are listed above, can also be used for ovarian cysts

      Estrogen is produced from body fat. Excess weight increases the amount of estrogen in the body, so make an effort to maintain a normal weight. Do your best to exercise regularly and reduce stress levels. Avoid the following herbs that stimulate estrogen production: Coleus, Cordyceps, fennel seed, licorice, and moutan.
      What Are Uterine Fibroid Cysts?
      Uterine fibroid cysts are noncancerous tumors that grow in or around the uterus. Uterine fibroids are a common medical complaint, occurring in up to 80 percent of …
      Uterine Cysts
      Uterine cysts are tumors that can vary in size from less than 1 inch to as large as a melon. Also referred to as uterine fibroids, or simply fibroids, these growths …
      Dong Quai Benefits

      Dong quai (Angelica sinensis) is a plant found at high altitudes in the mountain regions of China, Korea and Japan. It has been used for thousands of years to treat a …
      How to Cure Ovarian Cysts & Uterine Fibroids

      Ovarian cysts and uterine fibroids are two problems that commonly affect women. In many cases, they go away on their own, without requiring treatment. However, they …
      Uterine Fibroid Laser Treatment

      Uterine fibroids are quite common, and usually go away on their own. Even when this does not occur, these fibroids are usually benign. However, when they result in …
      How to Treat Uterine Fibroids With Natural Medicine

      Uterine fibroids are hard growths that occur in the muscle tissue of the uterus, particularly in women between the ages of 35 and 45. Often fibroids cause little or …
      Herbs to Take for Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

      Polycystic ovary syndrome is a disorder of the ovaries that causes multiple follicles to develop and form into clumps. Rather than disintegrate during menstruation …
      Ovarian Fibroid Procedures

      According to the University of Pennsylvania, fibroids are a common abnormal growth within the uterus and are the No. 1 reason U.S. women have a hysterectomy. Fibroids …
      Homeopathic Treatment Help for Shrinking a Uterus Fibroid

      In some cases, homeopathic medicine can be extremely helpful in shrinking uterine fibroids. A fibroid is a muscle tumor that can produce heavy menstrual bleeding …

  6. QUESTION:
    What are the signs of having Ovarian Cysts?
    if someone could give me all the details behind ovarian cysts that would be great.

    what are all the signs and things to look for?

    can it be hereditary?
    can it give you false positive pregnancy test and/or messed up and erratic menstral bleeding?

    • ANSWER:
      Symptoms of ovarian cysts: * pressure, swelling, or pain in the abdomen
      * pelvic pain
      * dull ache in the lower back and thighs
      * problems passing urine completely
      * pain during sex
      * weight gain
      * pain during your period
      * abnormal bleeding
      * nausea or vomiting
      * breast tenderness

      Poly Cystic Ovarian Disorder can be hereditary, check with other women on both sides of your family if they’ve had trouble with their menses. Check with your doctor about this.

  7. QUESTION:
    Is it possible to be pregnant with normal period for three months?
    At most, my period may be slighter lighter, but not much lighter. I have a blood filled ovarian cyst, which makes my period irregular anyway, I don’t really have any symptoms of pregnancy other than fatigue, and I feel like I’m gaining weight- But, I am on my period now.

    I have had unprotected sex but it has been three or four months, and as I said I have had fairly normal menstrual cycles since then, this includes normal cramping.
    I should add that my partner withdrew, he did not ejaculate inside of me.

    • ANSWER:
      It is impossible for you to have a period during pregnancy…though it is possible to have period like symptoms including bleeding…but usually it is caused by something else. For example: I had a subchorionic hemorrage (a bleed between the placenta and the uterus) which lasted a few weeks and caused me to have slight bleeding. But because the way our bodies are made it is impossible to have a period while your pregnant. Also the doctors will tell you that no bleeding is normal and they will want to check you out if you are for sure pregnant. Try taking a test.

  8. QUESTION:
    Will I lose weight after I remove an ovarian cyst?
    I will be having a 7cm cyst removed in a few weeks. I have looked at info online and saw that one of the many symptoms of having cysts is weight gain and having problems losing weight. My question is will I lose weight after the removal or will it be easier to lose? Any help would be great!

    • ANSWER:
      Hey :)

      I’ve lost 44 lbs (20 kg) in the last month! I’ve been trying for a long time and I’ve just started making some progress. Of course I’m doing some exercise, but nothing that hard, just around 30-40 minutes a day. What really helped me lose the weight was this new product I’ve been taking that helps you lose weight! I really suggest you give it a go, you can try it completely FREE if you use the link below:

      http://tinyurl.com/lose-weight-the-fast-way

      Good luck :) I hope this stuff helps you as much as it has helped me. Never give up!!!

  9. QUESTION:
    Will I lose weight after I remove an Ovarian cyst?
    I will be having a 7cm cyst removed in a few weeks. I have looked at info online and saw that one of the many symptoms of having cysts is weight gain and having problems losing weight. My question is will I lose weight after the removal or will it be easier to lose? Any help would be great!

    • ANSWER:
      I believe that the weight gain is due to a hormonal problem associated with the cyst…it could be the cyst or it could be something else in your endocrine system. I’d ask your doctor. Ask them if they think the weight gain could be due to thyroid problems.

  10. QUESTION:
    How likely is it that the ovarian cancer is being missed?
    I have been to doctors 3-4 times for bloating, sweating profusely, irregular periods, nausea(frequently), pain with intercourse, extremely tired, constipation, dizzy(off and on) and I have had an ovarian cyst 13 years ago. My “gut feeling” is that something is really wrong and getting worse FAST!! Im tired of hearing it is just stress!!! I know something is all out of sorts, there is no way I walk around feeling like this ALL day, pain , discomfort all day without soemthing being wrong, your take on this please.

    • ANSWER:
      If you feel like something is wrong, then you need to trust your instincts. Don’t let a doctor tell you nothing is wrong when you feel otherwise!
      Here’s a website on ovarian cancer: http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/ovarian-cancer/DS00293

      The early warning symptoms of ovarian cancer are:
      * Abdominal pressure, fullness, swelling or bloating
      * Urinary urgency
      * Pelvic discomfort or pain

      Additional signs and symptoms that women with ovarian cancer may experience include:

      * Persistent indigestion, gas or nausea
      * Unexplained changes in bowel habits, including diarrhea or constipation
      * Changes in bladder habits, including a frequent need to urinate
      * Loss of appetite
      * Unexplained weight loss or gain
      * Increased abdominal girth or clothes fitting tighter around your waist
      * Pain during intercourse (dyspareunia)
      * A persistent lack of energy
      * Low back pain

      The diagnostic tests for ovarian cancer can include a pelvic exam, ultrasound, and CA 125 blood test.

      If I were you, I would find a doctor that specializes in hard to treat cases (try a well known teaching hospital or clinic – my mom is having really good luck with UCLA for her yet-undiagnosed respiratory problem).

      Hope this helps, and good luck!

  11. QUESTION:
    How do you know if you have an Ovarian Cyst?
    I have no insurance, so i cant afford to go to the doctor right now to find out. But here are a few symptoms i am having:
    Weight gain
    No period for 3 months
    Blurred vision at times

    I have been to the free clinic in my home town, but they cant determine that sort of advance care. But they did a pregnacy test and the results were negative. so i know that that’s not what it is.

    Im really not sure what to do. What are the symptoms of the cyst? any information is greatly appreciated.

    • ANSWER:
      Cysts are very painful. Usually on one side or the other in your lower abdomen. When did you have the exam at the clinic? How long ago was the test done and how long ago did you last have sex? When you say blurred vision do you mean dizziness? If you have any other symptoms like breast tenderness, crampiness ,frequent urination or nausea since the last trip to the clinic and the test, I’d be getting a second trip to the free clinic for a second test if you had unprotected sex in the last three months. Or you can buy a home test and repeat it two weeks after the one they did at the clinic. Good luck. I don’t think you have a cyst or your first complaint would have been pain.

  12. QUESTION:
    What are the benefits of birth control?
    Besides the obvious, does birth control really help much with severe PMS, ovarian cysts and hormone imbalances? I was just prescribed Microgestin but cannot start until the first Sunday after my next period. My PMS is awful, I break out in hives and feel horrible. I also get cysts that cause my hormones to get out of whack. What should I expect when I start? Any experiences you can share?

    • ANSWER:
      Birth control can be used to treat all of your symptoms. Certainly it can be used to suppress the development of ovarian cyst. Since it is a hormone it will help control any hormone imbalances and symptoms of PMS. With severe cases of PMS you may need an additional medication to help curb the symptoms prior to and during your period. When you start the pill consistence is essential. You have to take the med every day at approximately the same time in order to be effective. After starting your gonna notice some changes. You may break out with acne, have a small weight gain, possible headache or slight nausea and usually some break through bleeding for the first 3 packs of pills. Keep with it. The symptoms will get better the longer you are on it. Once you have been on birth control for a while you are going to love the relief of your current symptoms. If you are still having problems after your 3rd pack contact your doctor, you may need a change of the brand. Don’t be afraid to call your nurse at the doctor’s office to ask questions. That’s why they are there.

  13. QUESTION:
    Does anyone have any experience of poly-cystic ovaries and what effects it has on having kids?
    I’m going for a scan tomorrow to confirm whether or not I have an ovarian cyst, but have been told that as I have a family history of PCOS I’m at slightly higher risk of developing it. Can anyone give me any information on how it affects fertility? I’m 24 and my partner and I are planning on having children, but not for a few years. I’m a bit nervous about everything and would appreciate any info anyone can give me. Thanks in advance.

    • ANSWER:
      Hello…I have PCOS.I started having symptoms of it when I was about 19
      yrs.old, after I had my Son(I was 16 when I married and got pregnant 3 wks. later and gave birth 2 mos. before my 17th Bday).Some symptoms
      include: Unwanted hair growth(facial mostly)
      Weight gain(especially concentrated around lower abdomen)
      Overlapping abdomen(belly overlaps pubic area like an apron).
      Hormonal changes(hot flashes,mood swings,night sweats)
      Darkening of the skin in the nape of the neck,elbows,knees,
      underarms,back of the neck(formation of creases here also)
      and inner thighs.
      Missed or abnormal menstrual cycles.
      Pain in lower abdomen in location of ovaries(cramping).
      These are just some of the symptoms that I know of and although I haven’t experienced all of these,I have other family members who have
      had varying symptoms.I was told by a Dr. that because of this I would probably never have any more children without fertility drugs or some kind of medical intervention but don’t ever lose hope because I found out I was pregnant exactly 9 months after that terrible news.Keep in
      mind that I’d been trying to get pregnant for a year to no avail BUT I
      believe that I helped myself.My periods have NEVER been normal and
      during that year I had maybe 2 or 3 periods.I started a vitamin routine.
      Every day I would take several vitamins including over the counter pre-
      natal vitamins and after 1 or 2 mos. of this I started having regular periods and I was pregnant 6 mos. later.I also have a cousin who was
      having trouble getting pregnant and now (without medical help)she has
      a little boy and a baby girl on the way!So don’t despair!Oh.Before I forget to tell you….if you would happen to start developing facial hair on
      your chin/under chin,your best bet if you can afford it is to have electrolysis done to kill the follicles and prevent new hair from coming back.If you try to pluck it out it only irritates the skin and causes an unsightly rash that unfortunately I had to learn the hard way and am still suffering with until I can afford to pay for the electrolysis.DO NOT
      SHAVE….EVER! No matter what anyone tells you,it WILL make it worse! I am 28 by the way and my cousins who have it are both 24.I
      hope this has been helpful to you.

      P.S.- They have medications to treat PCOS.They have been using Glucovage(the same thing used to treat diabetes!).They may have something new now.They told me I had 2 choices…A lifetime of taking
      the medication(they said I would become VERY ill for the first few wks.
      after starting it) or a hysterectomy.I said NEITHER! I have 2 beautiful
      children and I’m working on growing a full beard…lol….but I just take one day at a time and buy really good tweezers!Good Luck Friend and
      I hope this has helped you in some way:)

  14. QUESTION:
    Has anyone had a good experience with Depo Provera?
    I’ve noticed a lot of people are saying really bad things about it. The main ones that worry me are the weight gain and the hair loss.

    People have reported to have lost 20+ pounds. But I mean, is it ALL the shots fault or was it because your cravings for food increased?

    Does anyone have any good experiences with this form of birth control?

    • ANSWER:
      Depo-Provera has several advantages:[3][4][17][18]

      * Highly effective at preventing pregnancy.
      * Injected every 12 weeks. The only continuing action is to book subsequent follow-up injections every twelve weeks, and to monitor side effects to ensure that they do not require medical attention.
      * No estrogen. No increased risk of deep vein thrombosis (DVT), pulmonary embolism (PE), stroke, or myocardial infarction.
      * Culturally acceptable. Some cultures believe injections are especially efficacious. Injections also afford privacy because use is not detectable.
      * Minimal drug interactions (compared to other hormonal contraceptives).
      * Decreased risk of endometrial cancer. Depo-Provera reduces the risk of endometrial cancer by 80%. The reduced risk of endometrial cancer in Depo-Provera users is thought to be due to both the direct anti-proliferative effect of progestogen on the endometrium and the indirect reduction of estrogen levels by suppression of ovarian follicular development.
      * Decreased risk of iron deficiency anemia, pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), ectopic pregnancy, and uterine fibroids.
      * Decreased symptoms of endometriosis.
      * Decreased incidence of primary dysmenorrhea, ovulation pain, and functional ovarian cysts.
      * Decreased incidence of seizures in women with epilepsy. Additionally, unlike most other hormonal contraceptives, Depo-Provera’s contraceptive effectiveness is not affected by enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs.
      * Decreased incidence and severity of sickle cell crises in women with sickle-cell disease.

      In the largest clinical trial of Depo-Provera, the most frequently reported adverse reactions (which may or may not be related to the use of Depo-Provera) were: menstrual irregularities (bleeding or amenorrhea or both), abdominal pain or discomfort, weight changes, headache, asthenia (weakness or fatigue), and nervousness. Other, less frequently reported adverse reactions are listed in the patient and physician label information for Depo-Provera.

  15. QUESTION:
    Could late periods be a sign of ovarian cysts?
    My period has always been very regular, however for the past 6 months or so, it will be on time one month and late the next month. I’ve noticed a pattern of being late every other month. I used to get scared and think I was pregnant but now I’m thinking it may be something else like ovarian cysts since my mom has had them. Could late periods be a sign of ovarian cysts?

    • ANSWER:
      Irregular periods are… Late periods also can be a sign. But you need to get examine by a doctor (may be ultrasound) in order to know this for sure.

      According to my prof and the text book we use here at University of Calgary (Canada), symptoms as follows:

      1. Do you have a severe, sudden, and sharp pain or discomfort in the lower abdomen?
      2. Do you get pains around your abdomen, during or shortly after beginning or end of menstrual period?
      3. Do you have irregular periods all the time? (check for 3-4 months)
      4. Have you noticed a sudden weight gain?
      5. Is it difficult to pee (urination)?
      6. Do you bleed abnormally close to period or after the period?
      7. Breasts feel heavy or seems to be changing in tenderness fast?
      8. Do you have to shave your legs and other parts of the body where you have hair more often than you used to?

      If yes… then I am about 98% sure you have a ovarian cyst. But please see a doctor to get a good grip on what’s really going on.
      All the best!

  16. QUESTION:
    What are the side-effects or symptoms after taking borth-control pills?
    I was put on birth control pills by my doctor cyz I have a left ovarian cyst of 4 cms. I have been taking them for a week now and today I feel bloated, my breasts are tender and I feel fatigue as well as a mild stomach ache. Is this normal?

    • ANSWER:
      You should check with the gynaecologist once again, though the side effects are irregular menstrual bleeding
      nausea, weight gain, headaches, dizziness, and breast tenderness
      mood changes
      blood clots (rare in women under 35 who do not smoke)

  17. QUESTION:
    Is it possible to reverse polycystic ovarian syndrome?
    I’ve been diagnosed with PCOS (I get my period every month, although on ‘unexpected’ days). The side effects I dislike are hairiness and weight gain. Being on the Pill makes me gain weight, which worsens the symptoms. Is there a natural way to reduce or totally reverse PCOS?

    • ANSWER:
      Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common endocrine disorders in reproductive age women. This disorder characterized by the absence of menstruation or irregular and abnormal menstruation, excessive amounts of body hair, excessive body weight, and infertility. Women with PCOS often have multiple ovarian cysts, high levels of androgen hormones, and insulin resistance.

      Estimates suggest that polycystic ovarian syndrome is seen in 4-10% of women of reproductive age.

      Because the cause is not really understood, conventional treatment of PCOS is directed at treating the symptoms of the disorder.

      Weight reduction
      Medroxyprogesterone (Provera) for 10-14 days per month
      Low dose oral contraceptive pills
      Antiandrogens (spironolactone, flutamine, cyproterone)
      Metformin (Glucophage) to regulate blood sugar and improve insulin sensitivity
      Other medications may be used such as GnRH agonists and induction of ovulation
      Surgical treatment includes ovarian wedge resection, ovarian laser ablation, or ovarian electrocautery.

      Natrual or Alternative Treatment for PCOS

      Natural treatment of polycystic ovarian syndrome is multifactorial.

      Lifestyle. Exercise and weight reduction have been shown to be highly beneficial in the treatment of PCOS and its symptoms. Exercise can helps reduce weight, regulate menstrual cycles, and reduce risk factors for diabetes and heart disease which are associated with PCOS.

      PCOS Diet. Women with PCOS respond well to a low glycemic index, low simple carbohydrate, low animal product, high fiber diet which helps reduce weight, regulate blood sugar and insulin levels, and reduce inflammatory prostaglandins.

      Nutritional Therapy. Depending on your specific presentation of PCOS, there are a variety of nutritional therapies which will be considered. Nutritional therapies can help to regulate blood sugar and insulin levels, reduce circulating androgens, improve ovarian function, improve fertility, reduce risk of heart disease, and support liver detoxification of estrogens.

      Herbal Therapy. Depending on your symptoms of PCOS, a variety of herbal therapies may be considered. The goal of herbal medicine might include: reducing circulating androgens, optimizing ovarian function, and supporting optimal endocrine function.
      ***

  18. QUESTION:
    What are the symptoms of an ectopic pregnancy and/or ovarian cysts?
    What are the symptoms and signs of each??

    • ANSWER:
      the symptoms of ovarian cysts are:
      -pressure, swelling, or pain in the abdominal region
      -pelvic pain
      -dull ache in the lower back and thighs
      -problems passing urine completely
      -pain during sex
      -a slight weight gain
      -pain during your period
      -abnormal bleeding
      -nausea or vomiting
      -breast tenderness
      if you have the following symptoms, seek medical help immediately:
      -pain with fever or vomiting
      -sudden, severe abdominal pain
      -faintness, dizziness, or weakness
      -rapid breathing
      for the symptoms of ectopic pregnancy go here:

      http://www.ehealthmd.com/library/ectopicpreg/EP_symptoms.html

  19. QUESTION:
    Is it possible for a bladder infection to interfere with my menstrual cycle?
    I started feeling symptoms of a bladder infection saturday morning ( frequent urges to pee, pain while peeing) and this was the same day I usually expect my period. However, I did not get my period. Is it possible for my infection to interfere with my menstrual cycle?

    • ANSWER:
      I’m not sure, but this used to happen to my neice all the time.
      This was before she found out she had polycystic ovary disease(PCOD).
      She also had bad pain.
      She later was also diagnosed with kidney stones.
      After being treated for the PCOD, the bladder infections stopped and her periods returned to normal.
      Have a gyno check you for it.
      Other symtoms are gaining weight rapidly for no reason,
      trouble losing weight,
      pain on side, (from ovarian cysts),
      irregular periods,
      infertility,
      bloating,
      bladder infections,
      nausea and vomiting (with active ovarian cysts),
      excess facial and/or body hair,
      if you have any severe pain or difficulty urinating go to doc ASAP as it could be a ruptured ovarian cyst (which is an emergency), or a kidney stone.

  20. QUESTION:
    Woman who have taken or are taking Loestrin 24?
    I recently experienced an ovarian cyst rupture, and my doctor put me on Loestrin24 birth control pills to try to smooth everything out. I am a little worried about the side effects.
    I know every woman’s body is different and would react differently to the pills. But what was your experience with the birth control? Did you gain weight? How much? What other side effects did you experience.

    • ANSWER:
      I found it to be the perfect one for me. I had been on 2 or 3 different contraceptive pills before it and experienced really bad symptoms. The pill makes ur body think its pregnant and those pills made my body think that a little too much, including feelng sick in the morning! But loestrn was the best definatly. Im have the implant now, but only because I was terrible at remembering to take the pill, and id much prefer to be back on it!

  21. QUESTION:
    If i have ovarian cysts does it mean i have polycystic ovary syndrome?
    i was diagnosed with ovarian cysts at 15 and as i have researched the matter further i have come to know that this may affect my chance of becoming pregnant.
    can anyone help me?

    • ANSWER:
      not necessarily. Ovarian cysts are normal…but if you have polycystic ovarian syndrome then you have a hormone imbalance…lack of periods, weight gain, excessive facial hair, etc. Women with PCOS may have a more difficult time of getting pregnant but it is not impossible…usually with drugs the ovulation can be induced to conceive. If you have any symptoms of pcos its important to get treated as soon as possible to increase the chances of fertility and decrease the chances of diabetes and heart disease.

  22. QUESTION:
    What could be causing my infertility?
    I have a 4yr old but we can’t seem to concieve another and gave been trying ever since, I have had ovarian cysts once but they are gone. We try one my fertile days even ovulation day and nothing any ideas why its not happening?

    • ANSWER:
      The clue to your problem may be the ovarian cyst issue. The ovaries are part of the pituitary axis that consists of the adrenals, pituitary, ovaries, and the thyroid glands. ALL of these glands work as a team and get sick together. If your pituitary is insufficient, you will find it difficult to get pregnant. Eating lots of carbs, low fat, will exacerbate this problem. Drugs and treating symptoms like doctors do is NOT the answer. Most likely the problem that was causing the ovarian cysts is the key to finding the “Root of the problem.” This is a nutritional problem most likely and doctors have no training in that area at all. In fact, most give poor nutritional advice.

      A diet based on the principles of “Nourishing Traditions,” a book by Sally Fallon and Mary G. Enig, Ph.D. is the first step in the therapy of PCOS. Your ovaries need the animal fats, and yes, even the cholesterol found in food in order to make estrogen and progesterone, the correct female hormones.

      Swollen ovaries is a condition analogous to goiter, when the thyroid swells in response to iodine deficiency. Goiters often also result in a hormonal imbalance leading to hypothyroidism. In the case of PCOS, the starvation of the ovaries causes them to become cystic, swollen and eventually unable to regulate the synthesis of their hormones.

      The other main dietary trigger for this imbalance is that when the proper dietary fats are missing, they are inevitably replaced by excessive carbohydrate consumption. This results in excessive insulin production, weight gain, abdominal bloating, and eventually will itself cause hormonal shifts. The biochemistry of this process is well described in the book, “The Schwarzbein Principle” which also suggests a diet based on the principles in the book, “Nourishing Traditions,” along with a restriction to about 75 grams of carbohydrates per day. More good fats and fewer carbohydrate foods should help in restoring your hormones to their proper balance.

      In addition to the dietary program, there are many natural nutrients that I have been shown in the medical literature to help PCOS. The first is the protomorphogen extract from Standard Process called Symplex F. This is a mixture of specially processed glandular extracts from the four organs that make up the so-called pituitary axis–the pituitary, thyroid, adrenal glands and the ovaries. We now know that these glands compensate for each other, and that they all get ill as a group. I usually recommend taking 1-2 tablets per day for one whole year to help normalize the function of these important organs. You should be able to get the Symplex F from your local pharmacy.

      The final therapy that I recommend for PCOS is a 50/50 mixture of the herbal extracts of Peony lactiflora and Glycyrrhiza uralensis (commonly known as licorice). There have been three studies in the literature showing that this combination of herbs can result in a complete remission in PCOS, and that it does so by normalizing adrenal function and reducing testosterone levels. It is important to use the correct amounts that were also indicated in these studies. I recommend the Mediherb extracts and suggest 1/2 to 1 teaspoon of the mixture, 2-3 times per day. I usually suggest using this mixture for six months with breaks of a week or two every 4-6 weeks.”

      Birth control pills are the worst way to deal with PCOS. All that does is give you the “make believe health” and demonstrating very clearly that doctors have NO clue about what they are doing in regard to nutrition and how the body works in regard to nutrition that nourishes the body and does NOT abuse it with drugs.

      This solution is not expensive, by the way, and you should see results in a few weeks. In regard to getting pregnant, you need your thyroid working in top shape. The ovaries are part of the pituitary axis and when one of those organs get sick in the axis (thyroid, pituitary, adrenal, and ovaries), they all get sick. Fix the ovary deficiency and that will help the thyroid work better.

      In regard to the thyroid, I would check your iodine levels to see that you are not deficient. Get a bottle of Tincture of Iodine and paint a small 2″ x 3″ patch on your forearm early in the morning and see how long it takes for it to visibly disappear. You should see it 24 hours later. If it goes away in a few hours, you are deficient and this will cause the thyroid not to be able to make good hormones.

      good luck to you

  23. QUESTION:
    What are some symptoms of an ovarian cyst?
    My doctor says I might have one and I’m looking for similar women’s experiences just to compare.

    • ANSWER:
      What are the symptoms of ovarian cysts?
      Many women have ovarian cysts without having any symptoms. Sometimes, though, a cyst will cause these problems:

      pressure, fullness, or pain in the abdomen
      dull ache in the lower back and thighs
      problems passing urine completely
      pain during sexual intercourse
      weight gain
      painful menstrual periods and abnormal bleeding
      nausea or vomiting
      breast tenderness
      If you have these symptoms, get help right away:

      pain with fever and vomiting
      sudden, severe abdominal pain
      faintness, dizziness, or weakness
      rapid breathing

  24. QUESTION:
    What could be the cause of 3 missed periods and 3 negative tests?
    I’m 19. My last period was 4 months ago. I keep feeling like it’s going to come but it doesn’t. I’ve taken 3 tests so far and they all come back negative. I don’t have any pregnancy symptoms. The only other symptoms I can think of is that my bm (bowel movements) have been irregular since my last period and my acne has become really bad. I’m really hoping it’s not premature menopause. Please help.

    • ANSWER:
      Hi, here are some facts about irregular menstrual cycles. I hope this helps you to answer a few of your questions. Take care.
      Cycles between 23–35 days are very common. A woman may get her period only one to four times a year. Or she might have periods that occur two to three times in a month and involve spotting or extremely heavy flow. Alternatively, she may have heavy episodes of bleeding every two to three months. Irregular periods are simply what is irregular for you.

      For the most part, we don’t worry at the clinic about a missed period or two over the course of a year. More variation than that may indicate to us the beginning of perimenopause or a disruption of the natural chain of hormonal events that controls menstruation. A wide variety of factors can be responsible for irregular periods, among them:

      Significant weight gain or loss
      Over-exercise
      Poor nutrition (or a diet too high in carbohydrates)
      Smoking
      Drug use
      Caffeine
      Excessive alcohol use (interfering with how the liver metabolizes estrogen and progesterone)
      Eating disorders
      Increased stress
      Polycystic ovarian syndrome/estrogen dominance
      Uterine abnormalities (fibroids/cysts/polyps/endometriosis)
      Hormonal imbalance related to perimenopause
      Medications
      Chemotherapy
      Recent childbirth, miscarriage, or D&C
      Breastfeeding

      As you can see, there are many different ways a woman can be irregular for as many different reasons, and it can be very confusing when it happens.

      http://www.womentowomen.com/menstruation…

  25. QUESTION:
    does an ovarian cyst make you eligible for dla?
    looking for advice pls so only answer if you know thanks!!! i have a large fibroid tumour and an ovarian cyst, both cause me to bleeding stop and pain walking, i don’t want to waste an ones time if i claim disability living allowance at he high rate, pls help. thanks all.

    • ANSWER:
      Why suffer with this problem?

      PCOS is NOT the result of a DRUG DEFICIENCY. Let’s start with that. Many women suffer with this problem for years because of doctors prescribing drugs to treat the symptoms. That is not real health, it is “MAKE BELIEVE HEALTH.” Please, do yourself a huge favor and deal with the PCOS problem in a nutritional way and solve the problem.

      When doctors try to juggle hormones, they are attempting to play GOD with out the credentials. Birth control pills are dangerous and have no studies showing long term safety. The synthetic ethinyl estradiol used in those pills is the most stimulating to breast tissue and is 1,000 times more potent in it’s effects on breast tissue as estriol (natural estrogen made in the body that helps breast tissue). Estrogens tend to promote cell division, particularly in hormone-sensitive tissue such as the breast. Studies from two decades ago clearly found that overexposure to estradiol increases one’s risk of breast cancer. The synthetic ethinyl estradiol is even more of a breast cancer risk because it is efficiently absorbed by mouth and slow to be metabolized and excreted. The longer a synthetic estrogen stays in the body, the more opportunity it has to do damage. NOT A GOOD SOLUTION FOR PCOS! ! ! 1 in 7 women now get breast cancer!

      “Normalizing” hormones by simply giving you synthetic hormone pills violates the basic principle of healing. Instead, whenever possible, you should strive to normalize the hormones using your body’s innate intelligence. In your case, by changing your diet, you can start on the road to healing.

      A diet based on the principles of “Nourishing Traditions,” a book by Sally Fallon and Mary G. Enig, Ph.D. is the first step in the therapy of PCOS. Your ovaries need the animal fats, and yes, even the cholesterol found in food in order to make estrogen and progesterone, the correct female hormones.

      Swollen ovaries is a condition analogous to goiter, when the thyroid swells in response to iodine deficiency. Goiters often also result in a hormonal imbalance leading to hypothyroidism. In the case of PCOS, the starvation of the ovaries causes them to become cystic, swollen and eventually unable to regulate the synthesis of their hormones.

      The other main dietary trigger for this imbalance is that when the proper dietary fats are missing, they are inevitably replaced by excessive carbohydrate consumption. This results in excessive insulin production, weight gain, abdominal bloating, and eventually will itself cause hormonal shifts. The biochemistry of this process is well described in the book, “The Schwarzbein Principle” which also suggests a diet based on the principles in the book, “Nourishing Traditions,” along with a restriction to about 75 grams of carbohydrates per day. More good fats and fewer carbohydrate foods should help in restoring your hormones to their proper balance.

      In addition to the dietary program, there are many natural nutrients that I have been shown in the medical literature to help PCOS. The first is the protomorphogen extract from Standard Process called Symplex F. This is a mixture of specially processed glandular extracts from the four organs that make up the so-called pituitary axis–the pituitary, thyroid, adrenal glands and the ovaries. We now know that these glands compensate for each other, and that they all get ill as a group. I usually recommend taking 1-2 tablets per day for one whole year to help normalize the function of these important organs. You should be able to get the Symplex F from your local pharmacy.

      The final therapy that I recommend for PCOS is a 50/50 mixture of the herbal extracts of Peony lactiflora and Glycyrrhiza uralensis (commonly known as licorice). There have been three studies in the literature showing that this combination of herbs can result in a complete remission in PCOS, and that it does so by normalizing adrenal function and reducing testosterone levels. It is important to use the correct amounts that were also indicated in these studies. I recommend the Mediherb extracts and suggest 1/2 to 1 teaspoon of the mixture, 2-3 times per day. I usually suggest using this mixture for six months with breaks of a week or two every 4-6 weeks.”

      Birth control pills are the worst way to deal with PCOS. All that does is give you the “make believe health” and demonstrating very clearly that doctors have NO clue about what they are doing in regard to nutrition and how the body works in regard to nutrition that nourishes the body and does NOT abuse it with drugs.

      good luck to you


ovarian cyst symptoms weight gain

Ovarian Cyst Symptoms After Menopause

Women who are diagnosed with polycystic ovarian syndrome often suffer from an imbalance in their insulin levels. They begin to experience odd symptoms like growing excess body and facial hair, unexplained weight gain, irregular menstrual cycles, infertility, and acne.

PCOS can cause women to slump into depression especially if they are trying to start a family.. Your symptoms will not disappear just because you have had surgery or you take medication.. In doing my research about PCOS, pursuing natural remedies for cysts is the better treatment option.

A lot of women who have been diagnosed with different kinds of cysts have tried surgery and many different medications.. But to their surprise and disappointment the cysts returned after surgery and when they stopped taking their prescribed medications, the symptoms returned and were worse then before! Are drugs and surgery the only options for PCOS?

Yes there are other options, natural remedies. Genetic scientists have discovered that PCOS is a genetic condition.. It has also been linked to allergies to food and build up of toxins in the body.

The common drug that is used to treat infertility is clomiphen and the drug of choice for most health clinicians for their patients is metformin which is used to treat Type II diabetes.. Like I stated earlier, these treatment options treat the symptoms but not the root cause of the disease. Surgery is not always the best treatment option for your cysts especially if you are trying to get pregnant. Your cysts could redevelop and you may not be able to have children..

The environment we live in has toxins everywhere.. They are in the air we inhale and the foods we take in our bodies.. You can help your body restore its hormonal balance by detoxifying your body with all-natural supplements and natural cleansing products.. Research studies have seen some success with this. Getting rid of toxins in your body is only part of the picture. The other half is making some serious dietary changes..

If you are considering surgical intervention to get rid of your cysts, it would be wise on your part to consider curing your ovarian cysts naturally. Once surgery is done, that's it you can't go back.. You can't go back.

Detoxifying Your Body

Modifying your diet to a PCOS diet and taking the right nutritional supplements, will help to reverse the problems you are currently having. Detoxifying your body will help your body to repair itself naturally. These toxins are interfering with your body's ability to regulate insulin balance.

Just knowing what foods to stop eating and in some cases getting rid of toxic cleaners in your home can give you some relief from your cysts. Some women are ultra sensitive to certain foods and cleaning products.. If you use a lot of petroleum based cleaners, you should replace them with natural ones.

If you prefer to use sprays to clean your home, replace them with household sprays that are natural. You can prepare these cleaners yourself using essential oils or denatured alcohol.. Vinegar is an excellent choice for replacing toxic cleaners like ammonia and bleach. A potent solution of vinegar will not harm you but it will kill the bacteria..

PCOS Diet Modifications

Since PCOS is a hereditary condition, changing your regular diet to a diet for PCOS is the most effective way in treating your condition naturally.

I know that this is a difficult thing to do but your health depends upon it. Many women have made the necessary diet changes and have felt better in a matter of a few weeks.

Dietary modifications that you will have to make is limit or avoid all-together sweetened breakfast cereals, white bread, potatoes, and other foods high in starches. You should eat fresh apples, cherries, plums, berries, whole grain breads or sourdough breads, and low fat yogurt and milk.. Also consume more complex carbohydrates than simple carbohydrates and increase the fiber in your diet.

Maintaining healthy hormone levels could be as easy as changing the types of foods you eat and taking the proper herbs and vitamins..

About the author:

Source: http://www.sooperarticles.com/health-fitness-articles/vaginal-pain-articles/what-some-natural-remedies-ovarian-cysts-1112723.html

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Do ovarian cysts usually need to be surgically removed?
    I was told today after getting MRI results that I need to see an oncologist. I always thought that most ovarian cysts and fibroids are not cancer. I have no symptoms, no pain, no bleeding.
    Do you think I’ll have to have that godd-awful test called a ‘Hysterosonography?’
    the report mentioned that I should go for a transvaginal sonogram for more information.

    • ANSWER:
      Typically, ovarian cysts are functional (not disease or cancer related) and occur as a normal process of ovulation. During the days before ovulation, a follicle grows. But at the time of expected ovulation, the follicle fails to break open and release an egg, as it is supposed to. Instead, the fluid within the follicle remains and forms a cyst.

      Functional, or physiological, ovarian cysts usually disappear within 8-12 weeks without treatment. They are relatively common, and are more common during a woman’s childbearing years (puberty to menopause). Ovarian cysts are rare after menopause.

      Functional ovarian cysts are not the same as ovarian tumors (including ovarian cancer) or cysts due to hormone-related conditions such as polycystic ovarian disease. Some non-functional ovarian cysts must be treated to go away.

      An ovarian cyst can cause pain if it pushes on nearby structures, ruptures or bleeds. Pain may also occur if the cyst is twisted or causes twisting (torsion) of the fallopian tube.

      Symptoms of ovarian cysts can include:

      * Pelvic pain – constant, dull aching
      * Pain with intercourse or pelvic pain during movement
      * Pain during bowel movements
      * Pelvic pain shortly after beginning or ending a menstrual period
      * Abnormal uterine bleeding (change from normal menstrual pattern)
      * Longer than usual menstrual cycle
      * Shorter than usual menstrual cycle
      * Absent menstruation
      * Irregular menstruation
      * Abdominal bloating or swelling

      Often no symptoms are noted and ovarian cysts are found only be routine examinations. Usually birth control pills may be prescribed to help establish normal cycles and decrease the development of functional ovarian cysts.

      Simple ovarian cysts that are larger than 5-10 centimetres and complex ovarian cysts that persist should and will usually be surgically removed via laparoscopy (minimal invasive surgery).

      I would recommend that you discuss all the details such as the type of cyst, size of cyst etc with your doctor/gyno and ask them to answer any questions or concerns you may have.

      I have suffered from many bilateral ovarian cysts over the past 10 years and have had to have surgery 2 times to the cysts removed (it wasn’t anything too serious).

      I hope this helps to answer your question. Good luck :)

  2. QUESTION:
    How young is too young for a hysterectomy and oophorectomy?
    I’m 27 with 2 kids I was told I’d never have. I have endometriosis and recurring ovarian cysts and adhesions. I’ve had 7 surgeries (6 laparoscopies and 1 laparotomy) in the last 10 years and I’m going to have another one in less than 2 weeks. DH and I were hoping to try for a 3rd baby later this year but with the pain I’m in I’m almost ready to throw in the towel. Is it too soon to give up? BTW – my mom was only 23 when she HAD to have a hysterectomy.

    • ANSWER:
      There’s never a ‘right age’ for a hysterectomy. There are extensive potential long-term risks involved in early surgical menopause. However, often, the reason or basis for the hysterectomy outweighs the potential risks. However, Endometriosis is not one of those reasons.

      Endometriosis is absolutely not cured by hysterectomy and it needs no HRT to continue thriving following removal of the uterus/ovaries. Endo implants themselves produce their own estrogen-synthesizing enzyme, known as aromatase, and therefore, any disease left behind during the hysterectomy will continue to cause symptoms.

      The key to living well with Endo is to remove disease, not healthy organs. Before going into this next surgery, take time to learn about excision surgery. See the following websites:

      http://www.centerforendo.com

      http://www.endometriosistreatment.org

      http://www.endoexcision.com

      Hysterectomy has a role in Endometriosis treatment, particularly in advanced stages in those who also have adenomyosis. However, it is not a valid treatment to simply remove the uterus and ovaries without removing all the disease left behind.

      Good luck to you.

  3. QUESTION:
    How to treat an ovarian cyst?
    I just found out I have a little ovarian cyst. I’ve already been in pain for two weeks. I can’t take anymore. What’s gonna happen?? Supposebly they go away on their own, how long till it goes awayy? Help

    • ANSWER:
      Hi,
      You can’t depend on symptoms alone to tell you if you have an ovarian cyst. In fact, you’ll likely have no symptoms at all. Or if you do, the symptoms may be similar to those of other conditions, such as endometriosis, pelvic inflammatory disease, ectopic pregnancy or ovarian cancer. Even appendicitis and diverticulitis can produce signs and symptoms that mimic a ruptured ovarian cyst.

      Still, it’s important to be watchful of any symptoms or changes in your body and to know which symptoms are serious. If you have an ovarian cyst, you may experience one or more of the following signs and symptoms:

      ■Menstrual irregularities
      ■Pelvic pain — a constant or intermittent dull ache that may radiate to your lower back and thighs
      ■Pelvic pain shortly before your period begins or just before it ends
      ■Pelvic pain during intercourse (dyspareunia)
      ■Pain during bowel movements or pressure on your bowels
      ■Nausea, vomiting or breast tenderness similar to that experienced during pregnancy
      ■Fullness or heaviness in your abdomen
      ■Pressure on your rectum or bladder — difficulty emptying your bladder completely
      When to see a doctor
      Seek immediate medical attention if you have:

      ■Sudden, severe abdominal or pelvic pain
      ■Pain accompanied by fever or vomiting
      These signs and symptoms — or those of shock, such as cold, clammy skin, rapid breathing, and lightheadedness or weakness — indicate an emergency and mean that you need to see a doctor right away.
      Treatment depends on your age, the type and size of your cyst, and your symptoms. Your doctor may suggest:

      ■Watchful waiting. You can wait and be re-examined in one to three months if you’re in your reproductive years, you have no symptoms and an ultrasound shows you have a simple, fluid-filled cyst. Your doctor will likely recommend that you get follow-up pelvic ultrasounds at periodic intervals to see if your cyst has changed in size.

      Watchful waiting, including regular monitoring with ultrasound, is also a common treatment option recommended for postmenopausal women if a cyst is filled with fluid and is less than 2 centimeters in diameter.

      ■Birth control pills. Your doctor may recommend birth control pills to reduce the chance of new cysts developing in future menstrual cycles. Oral contraceptives offer the added benefit of significantly reducing your risk of ovarian cancer — the risk decreases the longer you take birth control pills.
      ■Surgery. Your doctor may suggest removal of a cyst if it is large, doesn’t look like a functional cyst, is growing or persists through two or three menstrual cycles. Cysts that cause pain or other symptoms may be removed.

      Some cysts can be removed without removing the ovary in a procedure known as a cystectomy. Your doctor may also suggest removing the affected ovary and leaving the other intact in a procedure known as oophorectomy. Both procedures may allow you to maintain your fertility if you’re still in your childbearing years. Leaving at least one ovary intact also has the benefit of maintaining a source of estrogen production.

      If a cystic mass is cancerous, however, your doctor will advise a hysterectomy to remove both ovaries and your uterus. After menopause, the risk of a newly found cystic ovarian mass being cancerous increases. As a result, doctors more commonly recommend surgery when a cystic mass develops on the ovaries after menopause.

  4. QUESTION:
    How do I know if I have an Ovarian Cyst or if i’m Pregnant?
    Is there anyway to know if I have an Ovarian Cyst or if i’m Pregnant without going to a doctor?

    Can I have any ides? I’ve just found out that they have the same symptoms….
    ideas* sorry type
    I also did some research, and I may even have an Ectopic Pregnancy?

    • ANSWER:
      Typically, ovarian cysts are functional (not disease or cancer related) and occur as a normal process of ovulation. During the days before ovulation, a follicle grows. But at the time of expected ovulation, the follicle fails to break open and release an egg, as it is supposed to. Instead, the fluid within the follicle remains and forms a cyst.

      Functional, or physiological, ovarian cysts usually disappear within 8-12 weeks without treatment. They are relatively common, and are more common during a woman’s childbearing years (puberty to menopause). Ovarian cysts are rare after menopause.

      Functional ovarian cysts are not the same as ovarian tumors (including ovarian cancer) or cysts due to hormone-related conditions such as polycystic ovarian disease. Some non-functional ovarian cysts must be treated to go away.

      An ovarian cyst can cause pain if it pushes on nearby structures, ruptures or bleeds. Pain may also occur if the cyst is twisted or causes twisting (torsion) of the fallopian tube.

      Symptoms of ovarian cysts can include:

      * Pelvic pain – constant, dull aching
      * Pain with intercourse or pelvic pain during movement
      * Pain during bowel movements
      * Pelvic pain shortly after beginning or ending a menstrual period
      * Abnormal uterine bleeding (change from normal menstrual pattern)
      * Longer than usual menstrual cycle
      * Shorter than usual menstrual cycle
      * Absent menstruation
      * Irregular menstruation
      * Abdominal bloating or swelling

      Often no symptoms are noted and ovarian cysts are found only be routine examinations. Usually birth control pills may be prescribed to help establish normal cycles and decrease the development of functional ovarian cysts.

      Simple ovarian cysts that are larger than 5-10 centimetres and complex ovarian cysts that persist should and will usually be surgically removed via laparoscopy (minimal invasive surgery).

      I would recommend that if you think you have an ovarian cyst that you consult with your doctor/gyno about this and ask them to answer any questions or concerns you may have.

      I have suffered from many bilateral ovarian cysts over the past 11 years and have surgery 2 times to have them removed (it wasn’t anything too serious).

      I hope this helps to answer your question. Good luck :)

  5. QUESTION:
    Are there any diseases or anything that could mimick pregnancy?
    I’ve had symptoms of pregnancy for a couple months but had both negative urine and blood test but still no period or loss of symptoms. Blood test for pcos, thyroid problems, etc. all came back negative as well.

    • ANSWER:
      Did anyone ultrasound your lower abdomen? What was the result?

      There are many conditions that can mimic pregnancy symptoms. Specifically what symptoms are you having? Because a lack of period (amenorrhea) and morning sickness do not confirm pregnancy as you may know. Illness, dietary changes, physical conditions and even stress can mimic almost all pregnancy symptoms. Hormonal imbalances can cause symptoms similar to early pregnancy. Pregnancy-like symptoms, such as nausea, vomiting, or breast-tenderness is a common ovarian cyst symptom. Secondary amenorrhea (loss of menstruation caused by something else) can cause nausea and swollen breasts. Secondary amenorrhea can be due to thyroid issues or a pituitary tumor as well as stress and premature menopause. There are other causes as well. But you’ve already said that your thyroid gland is fine so you can rule that out.

      There is a lot of additional diagnostic tests left to run. I’m fairly certain you’ll find out what’s going on.

  6. QUESTION:
    What are the signs and symptoms of endometriosis?
    What are the side effects without treatment, and what is the treatment, and how do they diagnose it. Does it always affect fertility.

    • ANSWER:
      From the Endo Research Center (www.endocenter.org):

      “About Endometriosis:

      With Endometriosis, tissue like that which lines the uterus (the endometrium) is found outside the womb in other areas of the body. Normally, the endometrium is shed each month through menses; however, with Endometriosis, these implants have no way of leaving the body. The implants still break down and bleed, but result is far different than in women and girls without the disease: internal bleeding, degeneration of blood and tissue shed from the growths, inflammation of the surrounding areas, and formation of scar tissue result. In addition, depending on the location of the growths, interference with the normal function of the bowel, bladder, intestines and other areas of the pelvic cavity can occur. Endometriosis has also been found lodged in the skin – and even the brain.

      Symptoms include chronic or intermittent pelvic pain, dysmenorrhea (painful menstruation is not normal!), infertility, miscarriage(s), ectopic (tubal) pregnancy, dyspareunia (pain associated with intercourse), nausea / vomiting / abdominal cramping, diarrhea / constipation (particularly with menses), painful bowel movements, painful or burning urination, urinary frequency, retention, or urgency; fatigue, chronic pain, allergies and immune system-related illnesses are also commonly reported complaints of women who have Endo. It is quite possible to have some, all, or none of these symptoms. Endo symptoms are varied and often nonspecific, so they can easily masquerade as several other conditions, including adenomyosis (“Endometriosis Interna”), appendicitis, ovarian cysts, bowel obstructions, colon cancer, diverticulitis, ectopic pregnancy, fibroid tumors, gonorrhea, inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome, ovarian cancer, and PID.

      Despite today’s age of medical advances, researchers remain unsure as what causes of Endometriosis. There is NO CURE, despite the continued propagation of such myths by the uninformed who still mistakenly believe that hysterectomy, pregnancy and/or menopause can “cure” the disease. Invasive surgery remains the gold standard of diagnosis, and current therapies continue to remain extremely limited, often carrying side effects.

      Mistakenly minimized as “painful periods,” Endometriosis is more than just “killer cramps.” It is a leading cause of female infertility, chronic pelvic pain and gynecologic surgery, and accounts for more than half of the 500,000 hysterectomies performed in the US annually. Despite being more prevalent than breast cancer, Endometriosis continues to be treated as an insignificant ailment. Recent studies have even shown an elevated risk of certain cancers and other serious illnesses in those with the disease, as well as malignant changes within the disease itself.

      Research has shown that genetics, immune system dysfunction, and exposure to environmental toxins like Dioxin may all be contributing factors to the development of the disease. Endometriosis knows no racial or socioeconomic barriers, and can affect women ranging from adolescence to post-menopause. The disease can be so painful as to render a woman or teen unable to care for herself or her family, attend work, school, or social functions, or go about her normal routine. It can negatively affect every aspect of a woman’s life; from her self-esteem and relationships, to her capacity to bear children, to her ability to be a contributing member of society.

      The disease can currently only be diagnosed through invasive surgery, and the average delay in diagnosis is a staggering 9 years. A patient may seek the counsel of 5 or more physicians before her pain is adequately addressed.

      Once diagnosed, it is not unusual for a patient to undergo several pelvic surgeries and embark on many different hormonal and medical therapies in an attempt to treat her symptoms. None of the current treatments are entirely effective, and virtually all synthetic therapies carry significantly negative side effects; some lasting far beyond cessation of therapy. The exception to this is excision; see www.centerforendo.com to learn more about excision as the leading treatment.

      Though Endometriosis is one of the most prevalent illnesses affecting society today, awareness is sorely lacking and disease research continues to remain significantly under funded. For instance, in fiscal year 2000, the National Institutes of Health planned to spend .5 billion on research. Of that funding, only .7 million was earmarked for Endometriosis – amounting to approximately $.40/patient. This is in stark contrast to other illnesses such as Alzheimer’s and Lupus, which received approximately 5.00 and .00 per patient, respectively. American businesses lose millions of dollars each year in lost productivity and work time because of Endometriosis. The cost of surgery required to diagnose the disease in each patient alone adds greatly to the financial burden of both consumers and companies alike.

      Once erroneously believed to be a disease of “Caucasian career women who have delayed childbearing,” we know that in fact, Endometriosis affects women of all ages, races and
      socioeconomic status. Endometriosis also can and does exist in the adolescent female population. Far from the “rare” incidence once believed, studies have found that as many as 70% of teenagers with chronic pelvic pain had Endometriosis proven by laparoscopy. Other reports indicate that as many as 41% of patients experienced Endometriosis pain as an adolescent. The illness can be quite disruptive and cause significant dysfunction, especially at a time in life when self-esteem, school attendance and performance, and social involvement are all critical. Many adolescents with Endometriosis find themselves unable to attend or participate in classes, social functions, extracurricular activities, and sports due to significant pain and other symptoms of Endometriosis. Sometimes, teens and young women lack support and validation from both the home and the school; told the pain is “in their head,” that they are “faking it,” that their debilitating cramps are “normal” and “a part of womanhood,” that they are merely suffering from “the curse,” or that they should just “grin and bear it.” Their symptoms may also be dismissed as a sexually transmitted disease, which Endometriosis absolutely is not. Failure to acknowledge and address symptoms early in the disease process can lead to significant delays in diagnosis and necessary, subsequent treatments. Lack of support from family and loved ones can also add to the patient’s pain and fear – at any age.

      Recent studies have also shown that Endometriosis may in fact have an even bigger impact on younger patients than older women. One such study discovered that in patients under 22 years of age, the rate of disease recurrence was
      double that of older women (35% versus 19%). The study also revealed that the disease behaves differently in
      younger women; leading some researchers to believe it is a
      different form of Endometriosis altogether. Surgery, considered necessary to accurately diagnose and
      effectively treat the disease, is often withheld from younger patients based on the injudicious belief that early surgery somehow negatively influences a young woman’s fertility. Extensive, cumulative research has shown this concern to be unfounded. What can impact fertility, however,
      is neglecting effective treatment of the disease. Some
      researchers also feel that symptomatic, adolescent-onset
      Endometriosis is most often a lifelong problem that will
      progress to severe fibrotic disease.

      While it is possible to become pregnant with Endometriosis, the key is to obtain early, effective treatment such as that offered by specialty treatment centers like the Center for Endo Care (see www.centerforendo.com to learn about the success of excision as treatment). Hysterectomy is not a cure for Endometriosis. Any disease left behind by the surgeon (whether by design because he or she ‘couldn’t get it all’ or accident because they don’t recognize the disease in all manifestations) will continue to thrive and cause pain and symptoms. It does not matter if the ovaries are removed or if HRT is withheld; Endo produces its own estrogen-synthesizing enzyme known as aromatase. Thus, it enables it’s own vicious life cycle and sustains the disease process. You would be better off getting all disease truly excised from all locations at a specialty center like the CEC (www.centerforendo.com).

      Due in part to the efforts of foundations like the ERC, research is ongoing in some places as to the causes of Endometriosis and potential cures for the disease. Our organization will continue to push for more widespread research into the many facets of the disease, and ultimately, a cure.

      For more information:

      http://www.endocenter.org/

      Endo Self Test:

      Not sure if you have Endometriosis? While pelvic surgery is the only current way to definitively diagnose it, symptoms can lead you and your doctor to suspect the disease. Review the following and consider if any of these common symptoms apply to you. Review your answers with your gynecologist for further discussion.

      Do you experience so much pain during or around your period that you find yourself unable to work, attend school or social functions, or go about your normal routine? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you have any relatives diagnosed with Endometriosis? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you find yourself with painful abdominal bloating, swelling or tenderness at any time in your cycle? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you have a history of painful ovarian Endometriomas (“chocolate cysts”)? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you have a history of miscarriage, infertility or ectopic pregnancy? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you experience gastrointestinal symptoms during your cycle, such as nausea or vomiting and/or painful abdominal cramping accompanied by diarrhea and/or constipation? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you have a history of fatigue and/or a lowered immunity (i.e., “sick and tired” all the time)? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you have a history of allergies, which tend to worsen around your periods? _____YES / _____ NO

      If sexually active, do you experience pain during sexual activity? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you suffer from autoimmune diseases or other conditions (i.e., thyroid disease, rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, fibromyalgia, multiple sclerosis, chronic migraines)? _____YES / _____ NO

      Have you ever undergone pelvic surgery like a laparoscopy, in which Endometriosis was suspected but not definitively diagnosed?
      _____YES / _____ NO

      If you have answered “yes” to one or more of these questions, you may have Endometriosis. Talk to your doctor about getting an accurate diagnosis and effective treatment today. Dull aching and cramping can occur during menstruation in many women and teens, due to uterine contractions and the release of various hormones including those known as prostaglandins. However, period pain that becomes so debilitating it renders you unable to go about your normal routine is not ordinary or typical! Pain is your body’s way of signaling that something is WRONG. If you are suffering from pelvic pain at any point in your cycle, an Endometriosis diagnosis should be considered.

      Know the Facts:

      - Endometriosis can affect women and teens of all ages, even those as young as 10 or as old as 85!
      - Hysterectomy, menopause and pregnancy are NOT cures for Endometriosis; in fact, there is no definitive cure!
      - Delayed childbearing is NOT what causes Endometriosis; in fact, no one really knows for sure what causes the disease, but research points to multi-factorial origins like heredity, immunology and exposure to environmental toxicants!
      - Endometriosis can only be accurately diagnosed via surgery; diagnostic tests like MRIs and ultrasounds are not definitive!
      - GnRH therapies like Lupron should never be administered in those patients younger than 18 yrs. of age or before a surgical diagnosis!
      - You CAN live well in spite of Endometriosis. WE ARE HERE TO HELP!” ~ www.endocenter.org

  7. QUESTION:
    What is a good hormone replacement to help relieve crying spells during menopause?

    Talk talk, I disagree. It is much better to learn from those who have actually taken the medication and find out how it helped or didn’t help rather than to pay for a prescription from the dr and go thru a trial period of hell only to find out that the medication is not helpful with this symptom at all.

    • ANSWER:
      I took medoxyprogesterone and estropipate for one year while transitioning from perimenopause to menopause. (Menopause = 1 year without having a period.) They helped greatly with the every-half-hour hot flashes, night sweats and restless legs, insomnia, terrible black depression, and even a little with the “menopot” weight gain.

      However, these hormones aren’t without risk and you MUST talk to your physician about whether they’re right for you. Some doctors will give you a few months’ samples of hormone replacement therapy. I stopped taking them after I began (after one year) to have significant ovarian discomfort. I have a long, long history of ovarian cysts, and I’ve had them burst, so I transitioned off the hormones.

      Some women find that black cohosh (brand names Estroven and Remifemin) help with perimenopausal and menopausal symptoms. I tried them but they did not seem to help me other than decreasing the insomnia. And the FDA doesn’t regulate them, so you’re depending on the manufacturer’s honesty regarding whether you’re getting the amount of medication they claim. Sometimes these two websites offer free samples. Since black cohosh can interfere with other medications and shouldn’t be taken with certain health problems, research it first.

      It’s hard to believe, but menopause is considered a “well state” and not an illness. I went through over 10 years of perimenopause and now, at 48, have been in menopause for 2 years.

  8. QUESTION:
    What could be the cause of 3 missed periods and 3 negative tests?
    I’m 19. My last period was 4 months ago. I keep feeling like it’s going to come but it doesn’t. I’ve taken 3 tests so far and they all come back negative. I don’t have any pregnancy symptoms. The only other symptoms I can think of is that my bm (bowel movements) have been irregular since my last period and my acne has become really bad. I’m really hoping it’s not premature menopause. Please help.

    • ANSWER:
      Hi, here are some facts about irregular menstrual cycles. I hope this helps you to answer a few of your questions. Take care.
      Cycles between 23–35 days are very common. A woman may get her period only one to four times a year. Or she might have periods that occur two to three times in a month and involve spotting or extremely heavy flow. Alternatively, she may have heavy episodes of bleeding every two to three months. Irregular periods are simply what is irregular for you.

      For the most part, we don’t worry at the clinic about a missed period or two over the course of a year. More variation than that may indicate to us the beginning of perimenopause or a disruption of the natural chain of hormonal events that controls menstruation. A wide variety of factors can be responsible for irregular periods, among them:

      Significant weight gain or loss
      Over-exercise
      Poor nutrition (or a diet too high in carbohydrates)
      Smoking
      Drug use
      Caffeine
      Excessive alcohol use (interfering with how the liver metabolizes estrogen and progesterone)
      Eating disorders
      Increased stress
      Polycystic ovarian syndrome/estrogen dominance
      Uterine abnormalities (fibroids/cysts/polyps/endometriosis)
      Hormonal imbalance related to perimenopause
      Medications
      Chemotherapy
      Recent childbirth, miscarriage, or D&C
      Breastfeeding

      As you can see, there are many different ways a woman can be irregular for as many different reasons, and it can be very confusing when it happens.

      http://www.womentowomen.com/menstruation…

  9. QUESTION:
    What Is Ovarian Cyst And how Can You Cure It?
    Can Ovarian Cyst be cured naturally?

    • ANSWER:
      Typically, ovarian cysts are functional (not disease or cancer related) and occur as a normal process of ovulation. During the days before ovulation, a follicle grows. But at the time of expected ovulation, the follicle fails to break open and release an egg, as it is supposed to. Instead, the fluid within the follicle remains and forms a cyst.

      Functional, or physiological, ovarian cysts usually disappear within 8-12 weeks without treatment. They are relatively common, and are more common during a woman’s childbearing years (puberty to menopause). Ovarian cysts are rare after menopause.

      Functional ovarian cysts are not the same as ovarian tumors (including ovarian cancer) or cysts due to hormone-related conditions such as polycystic ovarian disease. Some non-functional ovarian cysts must be treated to go away.

      An ovarian cyst can cause pain if it pushes on nearby structures, ruptures or bleeds. Pain may also occur if the cyst is twisted or causes twisting (torsion) of the fallopian tube.

      Symptoms of ovarian cysts can include:

      * Pelvic pain – constant, dull aching
      * Pain with intercourse or pelvic pain during movement
      * Pain during bowel movements
      * Pelvic pain shortly after beginning or ending a menstrual period
      * Abnormal uterine bleeding (change from normal menstrual pattern)
      * Longer than usual menstrual cycle
      * Shorter than usual menstrual cycle
      * Absent menstruation
      * Irregular menstruation
      * Abdominal bloating or swelling

      Often no symptoms are noted and ovarian cysts are found only be routine examinations. Usually birth control pills may be prescribed to help establish normal cycles and decrease the development of functional ovarian cysts.

      Simple ovarian cysts that are larger than 5-10 centimetres and complex ovarian cysts that persist should and will usually be surgically removed via laparoscopy (minimal invasive surgery).

      I would recommend that if you think you have an ovarian cyst that you consult with your doctor/gyno about this and ask them to answer any questions or concerns you may have.

      I have suffered from many bilateral ovarian cysts over the past 11 years and have surgery 2 times to have them removed (it wasn’t anything too serious).

      I hope this helps to answer your question. Good luck :)

  10. QUESTION:
    What are the other reasons for light period?
    Okay so I had sex with my boyfriend last april 11 and after a few hours i got my period. May 9 i had light period. I do not think i am pregnant, is it because of stress or something? Do anybody know why is it like that? Thank you
    And yes we had protection when we did it.

    • ANSWER:
      Causes

      Both internal as well as external factors can trigger light periods in women. Some of the most commonly found reasons are explained here:

      Hormonal Imbalance
      One of the most prevalent causes of a light period is hormonal imbalance where the woman’s body start producing excess amounts of the male hormone testosterone and less amount of the female hormones estrogen. Lack of sufficient estrogen tends to thin up the lining of the uterus which results in lighter menstrual flow.

      Menopause
      During menopause, the ovaries do not produce enough reproductive hormones like estrogen and progesterone and create a hormonal imbalance. As a result, menstrual flow decreases over a period of time before it comes to a complete halt. During this phase, menopausal women experience lighter period than usual and it is absolutely normal.

      Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS)
      In this condition, small cysts are formed inside the ovaries and this causes various menstrual abnormalities. In some months a woman may get heavy bleeding during period and in others it will be a lighter flow. They may even miss periods in some months. Such irregularities of period are accompanied by pelvic pain and nausea.

      Birth Control Pills
      If you are getting lighter periods after starting a new birth control pill, then it could be that pill responsible for that condition. The hormone present in these pills tends to bring about some changes in your body. As a result, the duration of the menstrual cycle and the blood flow during periods may decrease within the first few months.

      Pregnancy
      Yes, the possibility of pregnancy cannot be ruled out. When you get a light period all of a sudden and there are some early pregnancy symptoms like morning sickness, take a pregnancy test as soon as possible. Even though it is rare but there are some women who get light menstrual spotting in their first month of pregnancy.

      Stress
      Mental stress often has an adverse effect on the menstruation. If you are under a lot of stress, just before the onset of your monthly period, it is likely that you get a light period. This is because your body assumes it is an emergency and diverts the blood flow to the brain, lungs and other vital organs of the body to ensure normal body functioning. Once the stress levels go down, normal flow of period is restored.

      Excessive Physical Exertion
      Women athletes are prone to lighter periods because of their rigorous physical training sessions. When their physical activities are less intense, the menstrual flow usually returns to normal. Non athlete women may get lighter period after too much of exercising or traveling.

      Other Reasons
      Young girls and women who eat less to maintain a low body weight often get light periods. This happens because the lack of nutrition and low body weight affect production of hormones in the body. Those women who are suffering from chronic health problems such as diabetes or osteoporosis can have this kind of problem. It can be triggered by thyroid problems or as a side effect of certain medicines.

      Diagnosis and Treatment

      If you get it once in a while, then you may not require any treatment. However, other cases, require thorough investigation by your gynecologist. They conduct physical examination, blood test and Pap test to ascertain the cause. They may also conduct a pregnancy test, if required. Your lifestyle and medical history is also taken into account. The treatment then depends on the reasons for light periods. Change in diet and lifestyle is recommended in most cases. Stress reduction is also important to keep the menstrual flow normal. When strenuous physical activities causes this problem, the doctor may suggest you to cut down on your training sessions. Ovarian cysts are often treated with birth control pills and other medicines containing synthetic hormones. Women who have high levels of testosterone may have to undergo androgen therapy.

      If you suspect that something is wrong, there’s no need to press the panic button unnecessarily. Visit a gynecologist for check up. Conditions that lead to light periods are treatable and are not always an indication of some major gynecological problem. However, to avoid any further complications, it is best to seek medical help as soon as you sense something is wrong.

  11. QUESTION:
    What exactly is an ovarian cyst?
    and what causes them? are they easy to get rid of?
    do guys get cysts any where on their body?

    • ANSWER:
      Typically, ovarian cysts are functional (not disease or cancer related) and occur as a normal process of ovulation. During the days before ovulation, a follicle grows. But at the time of expected ovulation, the follicle fails to break open and release an egg, as it is supposed to. Instead, the fluid within the follicle remains and forms a cyst.

      Functional, or physiological, ovarian cysts usually disappear within 8-12 weeks without treatment. They are relatively common, and are more common during a woman’s childbearing years (puberty to menopause). Ovarian cysts are rare after menopause.

      Functional ovarian cysts are not the same as ovarian tumors (including ovarian cancer) or cysts due to hormone-related conditions such as polycystic ovarian disease. Some non-functional ovarian cysts must be treated to go away.

      An ovarian cyst can cause pain if it pushes on nearby structures, ruptures or bleeds. Pain may also occur if the cyst is twisted or causes twisting (torsion) of the fallopian tube.

      Symptoms of ovarian cysts can include:

      * Pelvic pain – constant, dull aching
      * Pain with intercourse or pelvic pain during movement
      * Pain during bowel movements
      * Pelvic pain shortly after beginning or ending a menstrual period
      * Abnormal uterine bleeding (change from normal menstrual pattern)
      * Longer than usual menstrual cycle
      * Shorter than usual menstrual cycle
      * Absent menstruation
      * Irregular menstruation
      * Abdominal bloating or swelling

      Often no symptoms are noted and ovarian cysts are found only be routine examinations. Usually birth control pills may be prescribed to help establish normal cycles and decrease the development of functional ovarian cysts.

      Simple ovarian cysts that are larger than 5-10 centimetres and complex ovarian cysts that persist should and will usually be surgically removed via laparoscopy (minimal invasive surgery).

      I would recommend that if you think you have an ovarian cyst that you consult with your doctor/gyno about this and ask them to answer any questions or concerns you may have.

      I have suffered from many bilateral ovarian cysts over the past 10 years and have surgery 2 times to have them removed (it wasn’t anything too serious).

      I hope this helps to answer your question. Good luck :)

  12. QUESTION:
    What, if any, health concerns does a person have when they have PCOD post-hysterectomy?
    I was originally diagnosed with Stein-Levinthal syndrome at age 19 and had PCOD throughout my 20′s and 30′s. I had a few surgeries for the cysts and finally a hysterectomy at age 43 because of a large cyst and endometriosis. I know that PCOD is associated with other endocrine problems (syndrome x, diabetes, insulin resistance, etc.) Once a person has a hysterectomy (including ovaries) are these health risks still an issue?

    • ANSWER:
      Hystersisters addresses this on their site:

      Will a hysterectomy or oophorectomy cure my PCOS/PCOD?

      Unfortunately, there is no cure at this time for PCOS.

      Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome/Disorder is a disorder of the endocrine system. While one of the symptoms can be polycystic ovaries, it is only one of many symptoms. Some women have polycystic ovaries, but do not have PCOS, while other women have PCOS yet do not have polycystic ovaries.

      An oophorectomy will obviously put an end to polycystic ovaries by removing them. It will not alter the other symptoms, which can include insulin resistance. If you were suffering from other symptoms before your surgery, they will remain after your surgery. One possible exception is that since the ovaries produce up to 60% of your body’s testosterone, when they are removed, it may be enough of a decrease in androgens to no longer cause unpleasant side affects.

      Are there any special HRT requirements after an oopherectomy?

      There has been very little, if any research concerning PCOS and HRT therapy after an oophorectomy. From experience, we see that it can take longer for the woman with PCOS to attain a balance of their hormones. This is because of other issues with additional hormones which may also need to be addressed. One thing that seems to be agreed upon by all is that the woman with PCOS should rarely be given testosterone or DHEA supplements.

      It is very important that the woman who has PCOS find a doctor who understands PCOS and surgical menopause. Not everyone in the medical community is up-to-date with the latest research and treatment options. It is important to get treatment for insulin resistance.

      For more information and support for PCOS symptoms and treatment, here is a link to www.soulcysters.com.

  13. QUESTION:
    Pink and brown discharge two weeks before period ?
    I’m on bc I haven’t took it a lot this past week because I’m paranoid about gaining Weight . I’ve had unprotected sex a lot with my hubby these two weeks. I’ve been under stress and tonight I saw a lot of brown pink discharge. I wiped and it was very very light pink?

    • ANSWER:
      Spotting Between Periods – Why?

      In women, normal periods lasts for about four to five days. The process stops and the body prepares itself for the next menstruation phase to begin. You might experience bleeding even after your periods have stopped. Irregular spotting can be stressful sometimes. This phenomenon is also observed during ovulation process. For details read the next points.

      Under Contraception
      If you are into contraceptive pills, you might observe some tinge of blood discharge from vagina and this process is known as ‘spotting between periods on the pill’. Various hormonal birth control pills and birth control non-pill shots can also cause spotting in between periods. If you miss a pill or if the hormonal level in the particular pill is not enough to supplement, you might face spotting even after your periods are over. Certain contraceptive devices, like IUD also add to the causes of irregular spotting.

      Ovulation Process
      Spotting between period and ovulation are closely connected, as it is one of the most common reasons. When ovulation occurs, the mature ovarian follicle bursts open, to release the egg. This burst follicle causes bleeding between menstrual cycle and there’s some amount of vaginal blood discharge. This type of bleeding is also accompanied by abdominal pain and cramps.

      Menopause Symptoms
      You might observe spotting, even if you are under complete menopause. This phenomenon is also known as impending menopause as, the ovarian activity and menstrual bleeding has paused, still there’s blood discharge from vagina. If you observe these symptoms, do not delay to visit doctor, as sometimes it demands greater concern.

      Cancer in Reproductive System
      Irregular spotting between periods or unusual bleeding can also be indication of cancer in reproductive system. It can be vaginal or ovarian cancer, uterine or cervical cancer. Reproductive system cancers can be treated successfully, if you do not neglect your health and get yourself diagnosed as early as possible. However cancer is a rare cause for spotting between periods.

      Infection and Diseases
      Bleeding or spotting might also be a sign of sexually transmitted diseases and bacterial infection. It can also be due to ovarian cyst or uterine fibroids. In poly-cystic ovary syndrome, the ovary gets covered with multiple cysts, that ultimately leads to frequent bleeding. Chlamydia and gonorrhea infects reproductive organs. The infection causes abnormal vaginal bleeding. In any case, if you observe unusual vaginal bleeding, go for immediate medical check up.

      Treatment Measures

      The treatment shall be decided by your doctor. Your role is to take a doctor’s help and follow his/her instructions strictly. Birth control and contraceptive pills should be taken as advised by doctors and do not skip the prescribed doses. Do not consume any pills that cause spotting. If you observe heavy discharge, get yourself diagnosed by doctors. Even if you are detected with any reproductive system disorder, treatments at early stage can always cure the diseases. Spotting after periods is also a healthy sign. It’s also an indication of pregnancy. So get the pregnancy test done for yourself.

      Whatever the reason might be, spotting after periods involves some amount of concern for women. But that doesn’t mean you should panic seeing blood after your periods are over. women’s body is always a strange anatomy. Be frank and never hesitate to discuss the details with your doctor. I wish you a good health!

  14. QUESTION:
    What are ovarian cysts? Are they dangerous? What can be done for them?
    My 18 year old daughter has large size cysts on her ovaries. Had ultrasound done and the doctors aren’t offering any answers to a diagnosis. Help!

    • ANSWER:
      Typically, ovarian cysts are functional (not disease related) and occur as a normal process of ovulation. During the days before ovulation, a follicle grows. But at the time of expected ovulation, the follicle fails to break open and release an egg, as it is supposed to. Instead, the fluid within the follicle remains and forms a cyst.

      Functional, or physiological, ovarian cysts usually disappear within 8-12 weeks without treatment. They are relatively common, and are more common during a woman’s childbearing years (puberty to menopause). Ovarian cysts are rare after menopause.

      Functional ovarian cysts are not the same as ovarian tumors (including ovarian cancer) or cysts due to hormone-related conditions such as polycystic ovarian disease. Some non-functional ovarian cysts must be treated to go away.

      An ovarian cyst can cause pain if it pushes on nearby structures, ruptures or bleeds. Pain may also occur if the cyst is twisted or causes twisting (torsion) of the fallopian tube.

      Often no symptoms are noted and ovarian cysts are found only be routine examinations. Others can cause symptoms, including changes in the menstrual cycle, including shorter or longer periods, skipped periods, and/or spotting between periods, pelvic pain or ache, especially during sexual intercourse or at the start or finish of menstruation, feelings of nausea or queasiness or breast tenderness.Usually birth control pills may be prescribed to help establish normal cycles and decrease the development of functional ovarian cysts.

      Simple ovarian cysts that are larger than 5-10 centimetres and complex ovarian cysts that persist should and will usually be surgically removed via laparoscopy (minimal invasive surgery).

      Is the doctor you have taken your daughter to your usual doctor or a gynaecologist? I would recommend that if your doctor isn’t a gynaecologist and isn’t offering any answers that you consult with a gynaecologist who specialize in this kind of thing and will be able to better help your daughter find an answer to this and which way would be the way to go as far as treatment.

      I have suffered from many bilateral ovarian cysts over the past 10 years and have surgery 2 times to have them removed (it wasn’t anything too serious).

      I hope this helps to answer your question. Good luck :)

  15. QUESTION:
    Is Tongkat Ali a good medicinal tea for polycystic ovarian syndrome?
    I heard it improves your total health. I was wondering if it would also improve PCOS and if there are any testimonials to this plant has various effects…thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      I have heard it is.

      Here is a list of herbs that can help with PCOS:

      Herbs: Since this condition is chronic, herbs can help greatly due to the fact that they are much gentler on the body than synthetic drugs. They also have fewer side effects and many can be used for sustained periods of time. There are numerous herbs that can be used for various symptoms of PCOS. Therefore, the most commonly used herbs are outlined below. NOTE: I have had great success using herbs, but have found only the tincture forms effective. Tablets are synthesised in a different way and do not work at all for me. I have conversed with other women who have found the same.

      Agnus Castus (also referred to as vitex or chasteberry): This seems to be the herb most commonly used by women with PCOS. Vitex has a direct effect on the pituitary gland; the gland involved in regulating hormone production. It seems to increase the level of LH, although the studies that have shown this have been conducted in women without PCOS. Therefore, this does not mean it increases LH levels in women with PCOS. The fact that it works so well in women with PCOS lends great support to David Hoffman’s (11) assertion that vitex is an adaptive herb that does whatever the body needs it to do. It seems to restore progesterone to a normal level , which is helpful for those with low progesterone levels. Low progesterone levels can cause miscarriage so vitex can help to prevent this. It is also used for irregular menstruation, amenorrhea and PMS.

      Donq Quai: This is actually a Chinese herb but it is widely available in Western health food stores. It is one of the best women’s herbs and has been dubbed “the female ginseng” (12). Similar to vitex, it can be used for long periods of time because it is a tonic herb. It nourishes the liver and endocrine system and is useful for irregular menstruation, PMS, period pain and menopausal symptoms. It is a phytoestrogenic herb.

      Black Cohosh: Black cohosh is a uterine tonic herb and exhibits an oestrogenic effect. It is widely used in menopausal formulas but is valuable for treating amenorrhea, irregular menstruation and PMS. This herb can also lower blood pressure.

      Saw Palmetto: Saw palmetto is traditionally used to treat male prostate enlargement. However, since it is an anti-androgen many women with PCOS use it to treat hirsutism and acne. It has a side effect of increasing breast size in some and consequently is used in breast enhancing herbal formulas to increase cup size. However, it does not always have this effect.

      Evening Primrose: a widely popular supplement taken by many women for PMS, fibrocystic breast disease and to improve skin quality. It can also help with irregular cycles. It is rich in G.L.A and linolenic acid; essential fatty acids which the body requires to regulate hormones. Evening Primrose oil also helps with heart disease, cholesterol and blood pressure.

      Progesterone cream: This cream has been widely popularised by Dr. John Lee, who advocates the use of this cream for many female conditions such as menopause, PMS, fibrocystic breast disease, ovarian cysts and PCOS. It can be ordered from various companies on the Internet.

      I get my herbs at pureherbs.com and they are awesome

  16. QUESTION:
    Besides pregnancy, is there a reason to miss your period?
    I’m only 17 and my period started when I was 13. I am sexually active and my period is about 4 days late. I can’t recall this ever happening but that doesn’t mean that it necessarily hasn’t happened. Could there be a reason besides pregnancy that I missed my period?

    • ANSWER:
      hi, here are a few other reasons as to why a woman misses her period not due to pregnancy.Good luck

      Stress:
      If you place yourself under significant stress, you can affect the area of the brain that produces the hormones required for properly functioning ovaries. Substantial weight loss can have a similar effect.

      Overactive Thyroid:
      An overactive thyroid gland can cause, amongst other things, absent or irregular periods.

      Pregnancy:
      This is perhaps the most well known cause of an absent period. If having missed a period, there is any possibility that you could be pregnant, you should probably take a pregnancy test immediately.

      Menopause:
      The menopause essentially means the end of mensuration and therefore the end of monthly periods.

      Polycystic Ovary Syndrome:
      This condition results in large numbers of ovarian cysts which can cause absent or irregular periods.

      Stress, being underweight, some infections can do it. Also, some birth control medicines can have the same effect.
      are you stressed? have you gained weight? lost weight? lots of physical activity?
      do you have a lot of stress?? that could be the problem
      hormones go to the family doc and explain your problem she will do an ultra sound and a blood test to find out it depends on how old you are… and if you changed your diet, are under stress, has lost or gain lots of weight, had a change in enviroment..
      lots of reasons Just go to the family doctor this is more common than you think..
      Have you gained any weight? Many things, such as PCOS. I would suggest seeing your Gynecologist. My missed periods were the first symptom I had before being diagnosed with a pituitary tumor. I’m not trying to scare you, just make sure you go get it checked out!

  17. QUESTION:
    Why am I bleeding in between my periods?
    So, I had unprotected sex then had a period shortly after. It’s been two weeks since that period and I’m bleeding again. What gives?

    • ANSWER:
      Spotting Between Periods – Why?

      In women, normal periods lasts for about four to five days. The process stops and the body prepares itself for the next menstruation phase to begin. You might experience bleeding even after your periods have stopped. Irregular spotting can be stressful sometimes. This phenomenon is also observed during ovulation process. For details read the next points.

      Under Contraception
      If you are into contraceptive pills, you might observe some tinge of blood discharge from vagina and this process is known as ‘spotting between periods on the pill’. Various hormonal birth control pills and birth control non-pill shots can also cause spotting in between periods. If you miss a pill or if the hormonal level in the particular pill is not enough to supplement, you might face spotting even after your periods are over. Certain contraceptive devices, like IUD also add to the causes of irregular spotting.

      Ovulation Process
      Spotting between period and ovulation are closely connected, as it is one of the most common reasons. When ovulation occurs, the mature ovarian follicle bursts open, to release the egg. This burst follicle causes bleeding between menstrual cycle and there’s some amount of vaginal blood discharge. This type of bleeding is also accompanied by abdominal pain and cramps.

      Menopause Symptoms
      You might observe spotting, even if you are under complete menopause. This phenomenon is also known as impending menopause as, the ovarian activity and menstrual bleeding has paused, still there’s blood discharge from vagina. If you observe these symptoms, do not delay to visit doctor, as sometimes it demands greater concern.

      Cancer in Reproductive System
      Irregular spotting between periods or unusual bleeding can also be indication of cancer in reproductive system. It can be vaginal or ovarian cancer, uterine or cervical cancer. Reproductive system cancers can be treated successfully, if you do not neglect your health and get yourself diagnosed as early as possible. However cancer is a rare cause for spotting between periods.

      Infection and Diseases
      Bleeding or spotting might also be a sign of sexually transmitted diseases and bacterial infection. It can also be due to ovarian cyst or uterine fibroids. In poly-cystic ovary syndrome, the ovary gets covered with multiple cysts, that ultimately leads to frequent bleeding. Chlamydia and gonorrhea infects reproductive organs. The infection causes abnormal vaginal bleeding. In any case, if you observe unusual vaginal bleeding, go for immediate medical check up.

  18. QUESTION:
    Doctor says I might have a cyst on my ovaries?
    My period has been pretty even in the past. I would get it once a month and it would last about 6 days… but up until a little while ago, my periods have been spread apart by 2 or 3 months and there has been little bits of clotting. So now my doctor says I have to get an ultrasound to check for a cyst… what does this mean?

    • ANSWER:
      Typically, ovarian cysts are functional (not disease related) and occur as a normal process of ovulation. During the days before ovulation, a follicle grows. But at the time of expected ovulation, the follicle fails to break open and release an egg, as it is supposed to. Instead, the fluid within the follicle remains and forms a cyst.

      Functional, or physiological, ovarian cysts usually disappear within 8-12 weeks without treatment. They are relatively common, and are more common during a woman’s childbearing years (puberty to menopause). Ovarian cysts are rare after menopause.

      Functional ovarian cysts are not the same as ovarian tumors (including ovarian cancer) or cysts due to hormone-related conditions such as polycystic ovarian disease. Some non-functional ovarian cysts must be treated to go away.

      An ovarian cyst can cause pain if it pushes on nearby structures, ruptures or bleeds. Pain may also occur if the cyst is twisted or causes twisting (torsion) of the fallopian tube.

      Symptoms of ovarian cysts can include:

      * Pelvic pain – constant, dull aching
      * Pain with intercourse or pelvic pain during movement
      * Pain during bowel movements
      * Pelvic pain shortly after beginning or ending a menstrual period
      * Abnormal uterine bleeding (change from normal menstrual pattern)
      * Longer than usual menstrual cycle
      * Shorter than usual menstrual cycle
      * Absent menstruation
      * Irregular menstruation
      * Abdominal bloating or swelling

      Often no symptoms are noted and ovarian cysts are found only be routine examinations. Usually birth control pills may be prescribed to help establish normal cycles and decrease the development of functional ovarian cysts.

      Simple ovarian cysts that are larger than 5-10 centimetres and complex ovarian cysts that persist should and will usually be surgically removed via laparoscopy (minimal invasive surgery).

      I would recommend that you wait until you have had your ultrasound and if you do have a cyst that you speak with your doctor/gyno about this and ask them to answer any questions or concerns you may have.

      I have suffered from many bilateral ovarian cysts over the past 10 years and have surgery 2 times to have them removed (it wasn’t anything too serious).

      I hope this helps to answer your question. Good luck :)

  19. QUESTION:
    What are benefits of hysterectomy?
    I’m 57. Stopped menstruation 5 years ago, but still have periods that are sporadic and painful. I have to use hormones because my hot flashes and mood swings are unbearable. And I mean unbearable. My questions: Does hysterectomy stop hot flashes, mood swings and periods? Do I need complete hys to stop all 3 problems? What are the benefits of leaving ovaries?

    • ANSWER:
      I’m 52, had a hysterectomy at 24 due to cervical cancer, kept my ovaries. A hysterectomy is a major operation and will change the way your body energy works in serious ways. I wouldn’t recommend it, but talk to other women in our age range who’ve had hysterectomies for the reasons you’re considering it. Also find an anatomy and physiology textbook at the library and read about what your ovaries and uterus do. My gyn was a good one, and said that they really didn’t know all the things the uterus did or its hormonal effects. You could try working with a naturopath or a Chinese herbalist/acupuncturist on your menopause symptoms. Also check out dietary influences and possible changes, as well as exercise, to see if that might make a difference. I’ve had a lot of ovarian cysts but have figured out how to keep them under control with my ND/LAc. We’re all different, and it’s way more complicated than most MDs will tell you, even a woman.

  20. QUESTION:
    i have not gotten my period in about 6 months and i think the reason may be because of my recent 20 pound?
    weight loss. i do have an eating disorder (which i am working very hard to overcome) but it is not too extreme. i was thinking this was the reason for my irregular periods, but then i realized that before i started my irregular eating habits i had irregular periods as well. once i start eating more normally do you htink they will come back? and i am 17 at the moment and by the time i want to have children do you think i will have any problems? please give me your input!

    • ANSWER:
      This could be: Polycystic (pah-lee-SIS-tik) ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a health problem that can affect a woman’s menstrual cycle, ability to have children, hormones, heart, blood vessels, and appearance. With PCOS, women typically have:

      high levels of androgens (AN-druh-junz). These are sometimes called male hormones, although females also make them.
      missed or irregular periods
      many small cysts (sists) in their ovaries. Cysts are fluid-filled sacs.

      About one in ten women of childbearing age has PCOS. It can occur in girls as young as 11 years old. PCOS is the most common cause of female infertility (not being able to get pregnant).

      The cause of PCOS is unknown. Most researchers think that more than one factor could play a role in developing PCOS. Genes are thought to be one factor. Women with PCOS tend to have a mother or sister with PCOS. Researchers also think insulin could be linked to PCOS. Insulin is a hormone that controls the change of sugar, starches, and other food into energy for the body to use or store. For many women with PCOS, their bodies have problems using insulin so that too much insulin is in the body. Excess insulin appears to increase production of androgen. This hormone is made in fat cells, the ovaries, and the adrenal gland. Levels of androgen that are higher than normal can lead to acne, excessive hair growth, weight gain, and problems with ovulation.

      Most researchers think that PCOS runs in families. Women with PCOS tend to have a mother or sister with PCOS. Still, there is no proof that PCOS is inherited.

      Not all women with PCOS share the same symptoms. These are some of the symptoms of PCOS:

      infrequent menstrual periods, no menstrual periods, and/or irregular bleeding
      infertility (not able to get pregnant) because of not ovulating
      increased hair growth on the face, chest, stomach, back, thumbs, or toes—a condition called hirsutism (HER-suh-tiz-um)
      ovarian cysts
      acne, oily skin, or dandruff
      weight gain or obesity, usually carrying extra weight around the waist
      insulin resistance or type 2 diabetes
      high cholesterol
      high blood pressure
      male-pattern baldness or thinning hair
      patches of thickened and dark brown or black skin on the neck, arms, breasts, or thighs
      skin tags, or tiny excess flaps of skin in the armpits or neck area
      pelvic pain
      anxiety or depression due to appearance and/or infertility
      sleep apnea—excessive snoring and times when breathing stops while asleep

      The ovaries are two small organs, one on each side of a woman’s uterus. A woman’s ovaries have follicles, which are tiny sacs filled with liquid that hold the eggs. These sacs also are called cysts. Each month about 20 eggs start to mature, but usually only one matures fully. As this one egg grows, the follicle accumulates fluid in it. When that egg matures, the follicle breaks open to release it. The egg then travels through the fallopian tube for fertilization. When the single egg leaves the follicle, ovulation takes place.

      In women with PCOS, the ovary doesn’t make all of the hormones it needs for any of the eggs to fully mature. Follicles may start to grow and build up fluid. But no one follicle becomes large enough. Instead, some follicles may remain as cysts. Since no follicle becomes large enough and no egg matures or is released, ovulation does not occur and the hormone progesterone is not made. Without progesterone, a woman’s menstrual cycle is irregular or absent. Plus, the cysts make male hormones, which also prevent ovulation.

      Because PCOS affects many systems in the body, many symptoms persist even though ovarian function and hormone levels change as a woman nears menopause. For instance, excessive hair growth continues, and male pattern baldness or thinning hair gets worse after menopause. Also, the risks of complications from PCOS, such as heart attack, stroke and diabetes, increase as a woman gets older.

      There is no single test to diagnose PCOS. Your doctor will take a medical history, perform a physical exam, and possibly take some tests to rule out other causes of your symptoms. During the physical exam the doctor will want to measure your blood pressure, body mass index (BMI), and waist size. He or she also will check out the areas of increased hair growth, so try to allow the natural hair growth for a few days before the visit. Your doctor might want to do a pelvic exam to see if your ovaries are enlarged or swollen by the increased number of small cysts. A vaginal ultrasound also might be used to examine the ovaries for cysts and check out the endometrium, the lining of the uterus. The uterine lining may become thicker if your periods are not regular. You also might have blood taken to check your hormone levels and to measure glucose (sugar) levels.

      Because there is no cure for PCOS, it needs to be managed to prevent problems. Treatment goals are based on your symptoms, whether or not you want to become pregnant, and lowering your chances of getting heart disease and diabetes. Many women will need a combination of treatments to meet these goals.

  21. QUESTION:
    Is it normal to have an irregular menstrual cycle?
    I am sexually active. I just got my period IM Gessing yesterday and it was a little different. I went to the bathroom and wiped and all i noticed were 3 VERY SMALL clots and that’s it. today when i woke up this morning NOTHING. when i went to the bathroo again I saw LIGHT BLEEDING and I am currently wearing a panty liner. This has NEVER HAPPENED before.
    Im 19
    Im 19

    • ANSWER:
      Causes of Light Periods

      Both internal as well as external factors can trigger light periods in women. Some of the most commonly found reasons behind light periods are explained here:

      Hormonal Imbalance
      One of the most prevalent causes of light period is hormonal imbalance where the woman’s body start producing excess amounts of the male hormone testosterone and less amount of the female hormones estrogen. Lack of sufficient estrogen tends to thin up the lining of the uterus which results in lighter menstrual flow.

      Menopause
      During menopause, the ovaries do not produce enough reproductive hormones like estrogen and progesterone and create a hormonal imbalance. As a result, menstrual flow decreases over a period of time before it comes to a complete halt. During this phase, menopausal women experience lighter period than usual and it is absolutely normal.

      Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS)
      In this condition, small cysts are formed inside the ovaries and this causes various menstrual abnormalities. In some months a woman may get heavy bleeding during period and in others it will be a lighter flow. They may even miss periods in some months. Such irregularities of period are accompanied by pelvic pain and nausea.

      Birth Control Pills
      If you are getting lighter periods after starting a new birth control pill, then it could be that pill responsible for that condition. The hormone present in these pills tends to bring about some changes in your body. As a result, the duration of the menstrual cycle and the blood flow during periods may decrease within the first few months.

      Pregnancy
      Yes, the possibility of pregnancy cannot be ruled out. When you get a light period all of a sudden and there are some early pregnancy symptoms like morning sickness, take a pregnancy test as soon as possible. Even though it is rare but there are some women who get light menstrual spotting in their first month of pregnancy.

      Stress
      Mental stress often has an adverse effect on the menstruation. If you are under a lot of stress, just before the onset of your monthly period, it is likely that you get a light period. This is because your body assumes it is an emergency and diverts the blood flow to the brain, lungs and other vital organs of the body to ensure normal body functioning. Once the stress levels go down, normal flow of period is restored.

      Excessive Physical Exertion
      Women athletes are prone to lighter periods because of their rigorous physical training sessions. When their physical activities are less intense, the menstrual flow usually returns to normal. Non athlete women may get lighter period after too much of exercising or traveling.

      Other Reasons for Light Periods
      Young girls and women who eat less to maintain a low body weight often get light periods. This happens because the lack of nutrition and low body weight affect production of hormones in the body. Those women who are suffering from chronic health problems such as diabetes or osteoporosis can have this kind of problem. It can be triggered by thyroid problems or as a side effect of certain medicines.

  22. QUESTION:
    Why did I miss my period in March?
    I dont know what to think. The last period I had was on Feb. 17th and I have not had another since then. I have had bands put on my tubes 6 years ago and I should not be able to get pregnant. I have had a couple of symptoms like, dizziness, nausea, and I could sleep all the time if I was able to. If there are any doctors or nurses out there that could let me know what is going on with me, I would gladly appreciate it.
    P.S. I am going to wait one more week to see if I start this month.

    • ANSWER:
      There are many reasons why you could not be bleeding, stress, hormones, ovarian cyst, or peri-menopause (depending on your age). It would be difficult to diagnose your symptoms without being seen by a doc. I would strong suggest making an apt. soon.

  23. QUESTION:
    Is it possible to get an ovarian cyst a few days after your period is over?

    • ANSWER:
      Typically, ovarian cysts are functional (not disease or cancer related) and occur as a normal process of ovulation. During the days before ovulation, a follicle grows. But at the time of expected ovulation, the follicle fails to break open and release an egg, as it is supposed to. Instead, the fluid within the follicle remains and forms a cyst.

      Functional, or physiological, ovarian cysts usually disappear within 8-12 weeks without treatment. They are relatively common, and are more common during a woman’s childbearing years (puberty to menopause). Ovarian cysts are rare after menopause.

      Functional ovarian cysts are not the same as ovarian tumors (including ovarian cancer) or cysts due to hormone-related conditions such as polycystic ovarian disease. Some non-functional ovarian cysts must be treated to go away.

      An ovarian cyst can cause pain if it pushes on nearby structures, ruptures or bleeds. Pain may also occur if the cyst is twisted or causes twisting (torsion) of the fallopian tube.

      Some functional ovarian cysts have no symptoms and are discovered, if at all, during routine pelvic exams. Others can cause symptoms, including changes in the menstrual cycle, including shorter or longer periods, skipped periods, and/or spotting between periods, pelvic pain or ache, especially during sexual intercourse or at the start or finish of menstruation, feelings of nausea or queasiness or breast tenderness.

      I would recommend that if you think you have an ovarian cyst that you consult with your doctor/gyno about this and ask them to answer any questions or concerns you may have.

      I have suffered from many bilateral ovarian cysts over the past 11 years and have surgery 2 times to have them removed (it wasn’t anything too serious).

      I hope this helps to answer your question. Good luck :)

  24. QUESTION:
    why ther is pain in vagina and clitoris while urinating?
    i have severe pain in the. vaginal and clitoris area during urinating.during since i am not able to reach my climax my boy friend insert his finger inside the vagina.will ther be any cut due to sex . whether the pain is due to that?

    • ANSWER:
      Hi,

      When a woman feels pain while having sexual intercourse, it is called dyspareunia. Painful sex is fairly common. Nearly two out of three women have it at some time during their lives. The pain can range from very mild to severe.

      Painful sex can have both physical and emotional causes. To understand why the pain occurs, you should know what happens to your body during sex.

      A woman’s body follows a regular pattern when she has sex. There are four stages:

      Desire — The feeling that you want to have sex.
      Arousal — Physical changes take place. Your vagina and vulva get moist and the muscles of the opening of the vagina relax. The clitoris swells and enlarges. The uterus lifts up, and the vagina gets deeper and wider.
      Orgasm — The peak of the response. The muscles of the vagina and uterus contract and create a strong feeling of pleasure. The clitoris can feel orgasm, too.
      Resolution — The vagina, clitoris and uterus return to their normal state.

      Types of Pain and solutions for that

      During sex a woman may feel pain in the vulva, at the opening of the vagina, within the vagina, or deep inside. Vulvar pain is pain felt on the surface (outside) of the vagina. Vaginal pain is felt within the vagina. Deep pain can occur in the lower back, pelvic region, uterus and bladder.
      Vulvar Pain
      Pain can occur when some part of the vulva is touched. The vulva may be tender or irritated from using soaps or over-the-counter vaginal sprays or douches. Other causes include scars, cysts or infections.

      Vaginal Pain
      Vaginal dryness. The most common cause of pain inside the vagina is lack of moisture. This can occur with certain medications, with certain medical conditions, or because you are not aroused. It can occur at certain times of your life such as during or just after pregnancy, while breastfeeding, or near or after menopause.

      Vaginitis. Another cause of vaginal pain is vaginitis — an inflammation of the vagina. The most common symptoms of vaginitis are discharge, itching and burning of the vagina and vulva. Vaginitis has many possible causes, such as yeast or bacterial infection.

      Vaginismus. Vaginismus is a spasm of the muscles at the opening of the vagina. It causes pain when your partner tries to enter the vagina. In some cases, vaginismus is present the first time a woman has — or tries to have — sex. The pain also may occur during a pelvic exam.

      Vaginismus also can be a response to a fear of some kind, such as being afraid of getting pregnant.

      Deep Pain
      Pain that starts deep inside may be a warning sign of an internal problem. Pain that happens when the penis touches the cervix can have many causes:

      Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID)
      Problems with the uterus
      Endometriosis
      A pelvic mass
      Bowel or bladder disease
      Scar tissue (adhesions)
      Ovarian cysts

      Emotions Play a Role
      Pain during sex sometimes can be linked to a state of mind. Emotional factors, like memories or fears, can keep you from relaxing. Some women may feel guilty having sex. Or, some women may be afraid of getting pregnant or getting a sexually transmitted disease (STD). Sometimes, a past bad sexual experience, such as rape or sexual abuse, may be the cause. All these factors may make it hard to relax during sex. This prevents arousal and lubrication.
      Finally …
      Pain during sex is a sign there may be a problem. Talk to your doctor about the pain so that the cause can be found and treated as soon as possible. Proper treatment can help you enjoy your sex life.

  25. QUESTION:
    What to expect with Ovarian Cyst?
    I just went to a family practice Dr. (not my normal OB/GYN) for what I thought was a bladder infection. Turns out I have an ovarian cyst on my right ovary. I am going in for an unltra-sound on Wednesday. Has anyone ever had a cyst on their ovaries? What should I expect as far as care/treatment? What are the chances it is cancerous? A bit worried about the future and confused as to what to expect, any info you have to offer is greatly appreciated.
    I had an ultra-sound today, the cyst is an inch in diameter and fluid filled. They called it a simple cyst.

    • ANSWER:
      I have had a number of bilateral ovarian cysts (which included functional (simple cysts) and hemorrhagic and endometrioma cysts (complex cysts)) over the past 10 years. I have only needed surgery for 2 of these cysts because they didn’t resolve after a few cycles (as they usually do resolve after a few cycles on their own).

      Typically, ovarian cysts are functional (not disease related) and occur as a normal process of ovulation. During the days before ovulation, a follicle grows. But at the time of expected ovulation, the follicle fails to break open and release an egg, as it is supposed to. Instead, the fluid within the follicle remains and forms a cyst.

      Functional, or physiological, ovarian cysts usually disappear within 8-12 weeks without treatment. They are relatively common, and are more common during a woman’s childbearing years (puberty to menopause). Ovarian cysts are rare after menopause.

      Functional ovarian cysts are not the same as ovarian tumors (including ovarian cancer) or cysts due to hormone-related conditions such as polycystic ovarian disease. Some non-functional ovarian cysts must be treated to go away.

      An ovarian cyst can cause pain if it pushes on nearby structures, ruptures or bleeds. Pain may also occur if the cyst is twisted or causes twisting (torsion) of the fallopian tube.

      Symptoms of ovarian cysts can include:

      * Pelvic pain – constant, dull aching
      * Pain with intercourse or pelvic pain during movement
      * Pain during bowel movements
      * Pelvic pain shortly after beginning or ending a menstrual period
      * Abnormal uterine bleeding (change from normal menstrual pattern)
      * Longer than usual menstrual cycle
      * Shorter than usual menstrual cycle
      * Absent menstruation
      * Irregular menstruation
      * Abdominal bloating or swelling

      Often no symptoms are noted and ovarian cysts are found only be routine examinations. Usually birth control pills may be prescribed to help establish normal cycles and decrease the development of functional ovarian cysts.

      Simple ovarian cysts that are larger than 5-10 centimetres and complex ovarian cysts that persist should and will usually be surgically removed via laparoscopy (minimal invasive surgery).

      I would recommend that you discuss your options with your doctor/OB/Gyn and ask them to answer any questions or concerns you may have.

      I’m currently using birth control pills to treat and try to prevent my ovarian cysts from recurring, however I have a simple cyst that is 3.2cm at the moment, meaning that the birth control pills does not always help to stop cysts from coming back.

      If you have any other questions, you can email me – the link to my email is in my profile. I hope this helps to answer your question. Good luck :)


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Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Has anyone had a good experience with Depo Provera?
    I’ve noticed a lot of people are saying really bad things about it. The main ones that worry me are the weight gain and the hair loss.

    People have reported to have lost 20+ pounds. But I mean, is it ALL the shots fault or was it because your cravings for food increased?

    Does anyone have any good experiences with this form of birth control?

    • ANSWER:
      Depo-Provera has several advantages:[3][4][17][18]

      * Highly effective at preventing pregnancy.
      * Injected every 12 weeks. The only continuing action is to book subsequent follow-up injections every twelve weeks, and to monitor side effects to ensure that they do not require medical attention.
      * No estrogen. No increased risk of deep vein thrombosis (DVT), pulmonary embolism (PE), stroke, or myocardial infarction.
      * Culturally acceptable. Some cultures believe injections are especially efficacious. Injections also afford privacy because use is not detectable.
      * Minimal drug interactions (compared to other hormonal contraceptives).
      * Decreased risk of endometrial cancer. Depo-Provera reduces the risk of endometrial cancer by 80%. The reduced risk of endometrial cancer in Depo-Provera users is thought to be due to both the direct anti-proliferative effect of progestogen on the endometrium and the indirect reduction of estrogen levels by suppression of ovarian follicular development.
      * Decreased risk of iron deficiency anemia, pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), ectopic pregnancy, and uterine fibroids.
      * Decreased symptoms of endometriosis.
      * Decreased incidence of primary dysmenorrhea, ovulation pain, and functional ovarian cysts.
      * Decreased incidence of seizures in women with epilepsy. Additionally, unlike most other hormonal contraceptives, Depo-Provera’s contraceptive effectiveness is not affected by enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs.
      * Decreased incidence and severity of sickle cell crises in women with sickle-cell disease.

      In the largest clinical trial of Depo-Provera, the most frequently reported adverse reactions (which may or may not be related to the use of Depo-Provera) were: menstrual irregularities (bleeding or amenorrhea or both), abdominal pain or discomfort, weight changes, headache, asthenia (weakness or fatigue), and nervousness. Other, less frequently reported adverse reactions are listed in the patient and physician label information for Depo-Provera.

  2. QUESTION:
    Can pineal cysts go away on their own or with natural remedies?
    I was diagnosed with a pineal cyst this morning after being in the E.R. all night. It is about 6.8 MM in size. I had the worst migraine ever along with blurred vision suddenly yesterday and this was the first time I ever had any symptom. I have read that there are usually no symptoms for those smaller than 5 MM. Any chances of this shrinking or going away completely?

    • ANSWER:
      First of all, please, don’t be panicky. Study it carefully and discuss with Ur family members/friends and implement it for a month. By His grace, let us wish, U shall be fine in a few weeks.

      Any lump*/lymph node enlargement*, in any part of the body on the skin, is a sign of blocked energy + toxins in the lymphatic system. It may be a boil, abscess, cyst, tumor [benign/malignant]. If possible identify it properly or U may use both medicines alternatively mentioned hereunder, for the best possible cure in 45 days.

      Everyone MUST be aware of——–Any Cancer, lupus, HIV/AIDS, Kaposi’s Sarcoma, etc., — Common Symptoms:
      Sudden loss of weight/stamina, anemia, unbearable pains in any organ despite medication, neuralgia, severe hair loss [with excessive accumulated heat in the body], FATIGUE-getting extremely tired for a little or no work, loss of appetite, unhealed wound in any part of the body for years together, chronic constipation, chronic hemorrhages, etc. Cancer may affect from any organ to any organ[s]/system[s].

      1. Cyst*— Cyst. A cyst is a sac that may be filled with air, fluid or other material. A cyst can form in any part of the body, including bones, organs and soft tissues. Most cysts are non-cancerous (benign). Some common examples of cysts include sebaceous cysts, small bumps that form just beneath the skin, and ovarian cysts. It’s important to note, however, that nearly all cancers are capable of producing cysts. (A sac containing liquid secretion or pus).
      •2. Tumor*—Tumor. A tumor is an abnormal mass of tissue. Like a cyst, a tumor can form in any part of the body. A tumor can be benign or cancerous (malignant).
      To determine whether a cyst or tumor is benign or malignant, a sample of the affected tissue — or, in some cases, the entire suspicious area — is removed and studied under a microscope. This is known as a biopsy. A swelling on any of the cutaneous, mucous or serous surface of any part of the body of independent growth.
      3. Fibroids: Benign Tumours are also called fibroids.
      •1. Cure for Cyst———–—Mixture of CF 3.x, CP 3x or 12x, CS 3x, NM 3x and S 12x.

      2.Cure for Tumor—-—Mature of CF 12x, CP 3x or 12x, CS 3x, KM 3x, KP 3x, KS 3x, NM 3x, NP 3x and S 12x. For small children’s bloody tumour-CF 3x is useful

      •Dosage*: 2 grains t.d.s.
      •All these biochemic salts/homeo medicines available @ local Homoeo shops, are safe and with side benefits. Don’t swallow medicine. The medicine to be dissolved on/under the tongue. Don’t take any thing 10 minutes before and 10 minutes after medication. You can take water.

      U may try both medicines alternatively. If not curable in 45 days, then
      any ways, U may see a general surgeon/local homeopath/dermatologist for physical examination, relevant investigations, accurate diagnosis and permanent cure by medication and or surgical interference.
      PS. If satisfied/benefited with, inform others to browse ‘Yahoo Answers’ on any health issue.

  3. QUESTION:
    What are the signs or symptoms of PCOS and how do they test for it?
    Im scared i may have this. Does it also mean that i may never be able to have children?

    • ANSWER:
      Women with Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) can and do get pregnant! Symptoms include irregular periods, weight gain, excessive hair loss, acne concentrated on the chin and jaw line. Your doctor will test for certain hormones and may perform an ultrasound to confirm cysts. It’s important to know that with a healthy PCOS-friendly diet full of lots of fruits and vegetables, lean protein, and small amounts of complex carbohydrates, moderate exercise along with any herbs and/or supplements you may need; you can reverse or eliminate your PCOS symptoms.

  4. QUESTION:
    How do you know you actually release an egg?
    I get the cervical mucus and my tempurature rises so I am ovulating. My periods are regular (28 to 30 days long). Does that indeed mean I am releasing an egg? I fear that I may have PCOS.
    28 to 30 day cycles.

    • ANSWER:
      If you have PCOS you will have most of the symptoms and the cysts around your ovaries. So ask your doctor if you do and get an ultrasound to check them out.
      “Symptoms of PCOS can vary widely from woman to woman and may include: irregular or completely absent periods, ovarian cysts, Hirsutism (excessive facial or body hair), Alopecia (male pattern hair loss), obesity, acne, skin tags, Acanthosis Nigricans (brown skin patches), high cholesterol levels, exhaustion or lack of mental alertness, decreased sex drive, excess male hormones and infertility. Other symptoms can include sleep apnea (breathing difficulties during sleeping), thyroid disorders and depression and anxiety. ”

  5. QUESTION:
    If I take medicine to fix my hormones will my facial hair go away?
    I have facial hair and in order to get rid of it with laser, I did some blood tests to check my hormones levels. They came up high and the doctor said that they will not go away….I don’t know what to do…

    • ANSWER:
      Do you have polycistic ovarian disorder?
      Are your testosterone levels elevated?

      Having elevated levels of testosterone is a significant sign of PCOS, Facial and body hair is also a sign of PCOS..

      Here are some symptoms of PCOS just incase you do not know.
      infrequent menstrual periods, no menstrual periods, and/or irregular bleeding
      infertility (not able to get pregnant) because of not ovulating
      increased hair growth on the face, chest, stomach, back, thumbs, or toes—a condition called hirsutism (HER-suh-tiz-um)
      ovarian cysts
      acne, oily skin, or dandruff
      weight gain or obesity, usually carrying extra weight around the waist
      insulin resistance or type 2 diabetes
      high cholesterol
      high blood pressure
      male-pattern baldness or thinning hair
      patches of thickened and dark brown or black skin on the neck, arms, breasts, or thighs
      skin tags, or tiny excess flaps of skin in the armpits or neck area
      pelvic pain
      anxiety or depression due to appearance and/or infertility
      sleep apnea—excessive snoring and times when breathing stops while asleep

      If you have any of these symptoms bring up PCOS to your doctor if you have yet to be diagnosed and talk to your doctor about metformin…
      Metformin is a pharmaceutical drug often prescribed for women with PCOS (Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome). It is an insulin-sensitizing biguanide commonly used to treat elevated blood glucose levels in people with Type 2 Diabetes. Metformin is used as an off-label prescription for PCOS. This means that it was originally used only for individuals with Type 2 Diabetes but is now prescribed for PCOS patients because it has similar actions in both groups.

      Many women with PCOS are insulin resistant. With this condition, the ability of cells to respond to the action of insulin in transporting glucose (sugar) from the blood stream into muscle and tissue is greatly diminished. Metformin improves the cell’s response to insulin, and helps move glucose into the cell. As a result, your body will not be required to make as much insulin.
      PCOS and it’s symptoms of hyperandrogenism (acne, hirsutism, alopecia), reproductive disorders (irregular menses, anovulation, infertility, polycystic ovaries), and metabolic disturbances (weight gain) have been linked to hyperinsulinemia and Insulin Resistance. Therefore, it makes sense to address the hyperinsulinemia and Insulin Resistance caused by this condition.
      Metformin improves hirsutism((facial and body hair)), induce ovulation and normalize menstrual cycles.

      Or you can talk to your doctor about Birth Control……For women who don’t want to become pregnant, birth control pills can control menstrual cycles, reduce male hormone levels, and help to clear acne. However, the menstrual cycle will become abnormal again if the pill is stopped. Women may also think about taking a pill that only has progesterone, like Provera, to control the menstrual cycle and reduce the risk of endometrial cancer. ( polycystic ovary syndrome puts women at risk for other health problems) But progesterone alone does not help reduce acne and hair growth.

      Medicine for increased hair growth or extra male hormones. Medicines called anti-androgens may reduce hair growth and clear acne. Spironolactone (Aldactone), first used to treat high blood pressure, has been shown to reduce the impact of male hormones on hair growth in women. Finasteride (Propecia), a medicine taken by men for hair loss, has the same effect. Anti-androgens often are combined with oral contraceptives.
      Vaniqa cream also reduces facial hair in some women. Other treatments such as laser hair removal or electrolysis work well at getting rid of hair in some women. A woman with PCOS can also take hormonal treatment to keep new hair from growing.

      I hope i helped!

  6. QUESTION:
    what is most perfect tretment to reduce the FSH hermon to its normal level?
    my FSH hermon was found to be 19.9 and this is very high.

    • ANSWER:
      FSH is often used as a gauge of ovarian reserve. In general, under 6 is excellent, 6-9 is good, 9-10 fair, 10-13 diminished reserve, 13+ very hard to stimulate. In PCOS testing, the LH:FSH ratio may be used in the diagnosis. The ratio is usually close to 1:1, but if the LH is higher, it is one possible indication of .PCOS.

      Next question what is PCOS.

      What are the symptoms of PCOS?
      Infrequent or irregular menstrual cycles
      Lack of ovulation/ Infertility
      Increased hair growth on face, back, chest, or toes
      Obesity, particularly weight around the waist (apple shaped body)
      Male pattern baldness or thinning hair
      Type Two Diabetes
      Elevated insulin levels or insulin resistance
      High Cholesterol
      Many cysts on the ovaries
      Acne
      Pelvic pain/ PMS
      What causes PCOS?
      We have not discovered what causes PCOS. Some women do have other family members with PCOS but we have not discovered a genetic link to PCOS. There seems to be a relationship between obesity and PCOS. PCOS researchers are looking at the link between insulin production and PCOS. Some women with PCOS produce too much insulin. The insulin in their body does not work properly so their body has to produce more to control blood sugar. Researchers believe there is a link between insulin production and PCOS. Because these women are producing too much insulin, this in turn, causes their bodies to produce excess testosterone. The extra testosterone results in facial hair, acne, and cysts on the ovaries.

      How is PCOS diagnosed?
      Diagnosis is generally made based on three observations, physical appearance, hormone testing, and ultrasound observations. There is no single test to diagnose PCOS. Your doctor may, perform a physical exam, review your medical history, check your hormone levels and glucose levels, or perform an ultrasound to look for possible cysts on the ovaries.

      PCOS Treatment
      Birth Control Pills – For women that are not trying to conceive, birth control pills will help regulate the menstrual cycle, help reduce male hormones, and help with skin’s complexion and acne.
      Diabetes medications such as Metformin (or Glucophage) – Metformin affects the way the body responds to insulin. It helps to make the insulin you have work better, it does not actually lower blood sugar itself. Metformin helps improve the way your body uses insulin so that it does not need to produce as much to control your blood sugar. Because insulin levels are reduced, male hormone production decreases as well. With this decrease in androgens women may see improvement in male hair growth and ovulation may return.
      Fertility Medications such as Clomid – Fertility medications may be used to induce ovulation.
      Anti-androgen medications such as Spironolactone – For women that are not trying to get pregnant, anti-androgens may be effective in treating skin conditions or excessive hair growth.
      Weight Loss – Obesity is linked to PCOS. Losing weight may help improve insulin regulation and glucose levels. However, because insulin regulation may be a factor in weight control, losing weight may be difficult.
      Surgery – If other methods of PCOS treatment do not work, your doctor may suggest ovarian drilling. This is not done as a first response to PCOS but sometimes used if other methods do not work. Ovarian drilling is done by inserting a small telescope into the abdomen. Small holes are drilled into the ovary with an electrosurgical needle. This procedure destroys a small portion of the ovary, which may reduce androgen levels and bring about ovulation.

      The easisest way would be to go on the pill it would hopefully stop some of the symtoms which are assosiated with this.

  7. QUESTION:
    Can anyone tell me about digestive malabsorption disorders?
    My primary care doctor has referred me to a gastroenterologist for evaluation for a possible malabsorption problem. My only symptoms are unexplained weight loss of a little over 10% of my body weight over the past 6 months and somewhat frequent bowel movements (not diarrhea, just ‘going’ 3-4X/day, almost always in the morning). My appetite, diet and activity level remain unchanged and I feel fine. I’m too skinny as it is and very worried about losing any more weight.

    For the record, I’m a 43-year-old female in otherwise good health; I do have a family history of pancreatic, prostate and colon cancer.

    Has anyone else experienced similar symptoms? If so, what was your diagnosis?

    I appreciate any insights.

    • ANSWER:
      Sounds like Celiac Disease!You have all the symptoms and the family history is very telling. Be sure to ask the GI for the blood test series to test for CD. If it is CD, count your blessings! What other disease can be treated by only the gluten free diet!! No pills, no surgeries, nothing! Just don’t eat gluten!! Its amazing!! I had all those symptoms as you and the family history was the same!! I had the consitpation, bloating, (diarrhea or frequent Bm’s is another symptom of CD, its different for everyone). dental problems, infertility, stomach pain, bleeding, hair loss, weight loss then gain, acne, sinus problems, ovarian cysts. ALL attributed to Celiac Disease!!

      here’s more info below from www.csaceliacs.org
      Best of luck!
      Amy
      Chairperson Louisiana North Shore Celiac Sprue Association

      What are the symptoms

      of Celiac Disease?

      The symptoms of celiac disease (CD) vary so widely among patients that there is no such thing as a “typical celiac.” The amount of intestinal damage that has occurred and the length of time nutrient absorption has been abnormal seem to be the factors that determine the type and severity of symptoms experienced. It is interesting to note that some people with CD report no symptoms at all.

      “Celiac disease is one of the great mimics in gastroenterology in particular and medicine in general. Of 100 patients with CD, just over 10 percent present with classical overt symptoms of malabsorption such as weight loss, diarrhea and nutritional deficiencies. About 10 percent are incorrectly diagnosed for some length of time, in some cases years. Forty percent present in an atypical manner, which leads to lengthy delay in diagnosis. About 33 percent of patients have clinically silent disease and 7 percent have latent CD (no symptoms or small bowel lesion but will develop CD later, or had disease at an early age and resolved).”

      C. Robert Dahl, MD, “Celiac Disease: The Great Mimic Presentation,” CSA Annual Conference, September 2000,

      Return to top

      A. The Patient’s Physical State

      What are the symptoms? How long have they been present? How often do they occur?

      * Abdominal cramping/bloating

      * Feet (Reduced fat padding)

      * Abdominal distention

      * Flatus (Passing gas)

      * Acidosis

      * Gluten ataxia

      * Appetite (Increased to the point of craving)

      * Mouth sores or cracks in the corners

      * Back pain (Such as a result of collapsed lumbar vertebrae)

      * Muscle cramping (Especially in the hands and legs)

      * Constipation

      * Night blindness

      * Decreased ability to clot blood

      * Skin (Very dry)

      * Dehydration

      * Stools (Loose? Hard? Small? Large? Foul smelling? Floating? Clay, Light tan or Gray-colored? Highly rancid? Frothy?)

      * Diarrhea (See Stools below)

      * Tongue (Smooth or geographic – looks like different continents)

      * Edema

      * Tooth enamel defects

      * Electrolyte depletion

      * Weakness

      * Energy loss

      * Weight loss

      * Fatigue

      Return to top

      B. The Patient’s Emotional State

      What is the patient’s emotional state? Is it consistent throughout the day? When and for how long do the symptoms occur?

      * Depression

      * Disinterested in normal activities

      * Irritable

      * Mood changes

      * Unable to concentrate

      Return to top

      C. Additional Conditions

      What else is involved? Other diseases? Other organs?

      * Amenorrhea

      * Iron-deficiency anemia

      * Bone disease

      * Hyperparathyroidism

      How is Celiac Disease Diagnosed?

      When working with a physician to diagnose and/or confirm celiac disease (CD), three major steps are taken. First, a thorough physical examination is conducted, including a series of blood tests, sometimes referred to as the Celiac Blood Panel. Second, a duodenal biopsy is performed with multiple samples from multiple locations in the small intestine. And third, the gluten-free diet is implemented. When the patient shows a positive response to the diet – symptoms subside and the small intestine returns to its normal, healthy state – the diagnosis of CD is confirmed.

      (NOTE: To ensure the most accurate and timely diagnosis, the gluten-free diet should be implemented only after the first two steps have been completed.)

      1: Examination

      Patient History

      When reviewing a patient’s medical history and symptoms with a physician, the following areas should be considered in the discussion: (The first three are applicable to adults and children. The last is specific to children.)

      * What are the symptoms? How long have they been present? How often do they occur?

      * What is the patient’s emotional state? Is it consistent throughout the day? When and for how long do the symptoms occur?

      * What else is involved? Other diseases? Other organs?

      * How is the child developing?

      See What are the Symptoms of Celiac Disease? for a thorough list of possible symptoms.

      Physical Examination

      Depending on the presentation of symptoms, the physician will check for some of the following items:

      * emaciation

      * pallor (due to anemia)

      * hypotension (low blood pressure)

      * edema (due to low levels of protein, [albumin] in the blood)

      * dermatitis herpetiformis (skin lesions)

      * easy bruising (lack of vitamin K)

      * bone or skin and mucosa membrane changes due to vitamin deficiencies

      * protruding or distended abdomen (intestine dysmotility)

      * loss of various sensations in extremities including vibration, position and light touch (vitamin deficiency)

      * signs of severe vitamin/mineral deficiencies which may include:
      * -diminished deep tendon reflexes

      * muscle spasms (magnesium and/or calcium deficiency)

      * bone tenderness and bone pain (due to osteomalacia)

      Blood Tests

      A number of tests, sometimes collectively referred to as the Celiac Blood Panel, will aid the physician in diagnosis. The tests may include, but are not limited to:

      *
      Serologic Tests

      1. EMA (Immunoglobulin A anti-endomysium antibodies)
      2. AGA (IgA anti-gliadin antibodies)
      3. AGG (IgG anti-gliadin antibodies)
      4. tTGA (IgA anti-tissue transglutaminase)

      * Tolerance or Measure of Digestion/Absorption Tests

      1. Lactose tolerance test.
      2. D-Xylose test.

      Return to top

      2: Biopsy

      In the event that clinical signs and laboratory tests indicate probable malabsorption, a biopsy of the small intestine [jejunal] is called for. In this test, a small flexible biopsy instrument is passed through a tube, down the throat, through the stomach and into the upper end of the small intestine where patchy, multiple snippets of tissue are gathered. The tube is removed and the tissue samples are examined under a microscope for signs of injury.

      CD DiagnosisThe difference between tissue in a normal small intestine and that found in a celiac patient is remarkable. The normal finger-like projections (villi), which increase the absorptive surface area of the small intestine, are partially or totally flattened in a person with celiac disease. Enzymes located on the brush border are also drastically reduced. Lactase, the enzyme responsible for splitting milk sugar (lactose) so it can be absorbed, is an example of one of these brush border enzymes. This decrease in lactase explains why some untreated celiac patients may not be able to tolerate milk products and will have developed lactose intolerance. Elevated numbers of T-cell lymphocytes (white blood cells) are also present. The small bowel biopsy samples of persons with dermatitis herpetiformis often show similar damage.

      To view a color-coded illustration of a single villus, visit MEDLINEplus.

      NOTE: At this time there is no standardization in either serological testing or intestinal biopsies.

      To view a chart showing typical test results for someone with celiac disease

      Click Here

      Return to top

      3: Diet

      The diagnosis of celiac disease is complete when the health of the patient improves following implementation of the gluten-free (GF) diet. When gluten is removed from the diet, most of the damage that was done to the small intestine (the jejunum) is repaired. It takes only three to six days for the intestinal lining (the mucosa) to show improvement. Within three to six months, most symptoms subside as the mucosa returns to its normal (or nearly normal) state.

      For an explanation of the gluten-free diet, see:

      * How is Celiac Disease Treated?
      * Gluten-Free Diet: Basic Diet Choices
      * Gluten-Free Diet: Grains and Flours

      If, after six months on the GF diet, symptoms still persist, the following need to be considered:

      * Has gluten been removed from every area of your diet and life?

      (See How is Celiac Disease Treated? for information on where gluten can “hide” in food and other products.)

      * Do unrelated conditions exist that are causing the continued discomfort?

      (See How is Celiac Disease Treated? for information on additional conditions that may be present.)

      The GF diet is a risk-free diet! Gluten, as a protein, is not essential to the diet and its amino acid components are replaced many times over by other foods. Adopting the GF diet can only result in improved health and well-being.

      The medical information on this page was last reviewed/updated on January 1, 2004.

  8. QUESTION:
    how long does it take for weight loss to show using anorexia?
    my friend is 288 pounds and shes in the 9th grade.
    she hasn’t ate for a day and half because shes depressed her boyfriend of a year and a half broke up with her. Shes considering Anorexia, and i would like to know the side affects to help her and also how long. she thinks she can loose 40 pounds in two weeks by not eating nothing at all and also not exercising. please help.

    • ANSWER:
      It is physically impossible to lose weight as soon as you get anorexia. However, there is a bigger picture that I would like to stress. Your friend cannot “consider” anorexia. Anorexia is a terrible psychological disorder that screws up your perception about what healthy eating is. It is accompanied by very low self esteem and usually other psychological issues such as depression. As someone with an eating disorder, I am disgusted that your friend is considering such a thing. If she wants to lose weight, she should go to a dietian and lose weight in a healthful manner.

      I got this list from a Facebook forum targeted at eating disorder support, originally written by Bony Pink:

      Psychiatric complications from anorexia, bulimia and ED-NOS:

      (Most of these can occur before or after the onset of the eating disorder.)

      Depression; social anxiety/phobia; personality disorders; abuse (ED sufferers are at a higher risk for all types of abuse, including physical, emotional and sexual, as well, rape and abuse are the number one cause of eating disorders); suicidal thoughts and actions; low self-esteem; self harm; isolation; aggression; paranoia; psychosis; body dysmorphic disorder; self-hatred; difficultly in relationships; drug abuse and alcoholism; obsessive compulsive disorder; sexual dysfunction; need for psychiatric observation in a locked ward; fear of the opposite sex; lack of motivation to find work, go to school, etc.; anxiety; panic attacks; “forget” how to eat normally; obsessions; easily addicted; etc.

      Medical complications from anorexia, bulimia, and ED-NOS:

      Fatigue; dizziness; hair loss; motor skill impairment; lanugo (downy hair that grows all over the body after extreme fat loss, as a last ditch effort to keep warm); insomnia; sleep cycle impairment; tooth decay; tooth loss; increased susceptibility to infection; liver failure; kidney failure (extremely common, and often sets in early on during starvation), heart failure; heart attack; anal prolapse; muscle deterioration; ulcers; decreased or absent bowel function; loss of menstruation leading to: ovarian cysts, increased risk of ovarian or cervical cancer, hormonal imbalances, infertility, etc.; lack of calcium, leading to decreased bone density and eventually osteoporosis — symptoms of which are pain, shrinkage of the spin and limbs, regular fractures in the bones; constantly feel cold; confusion; slowed metabolism; nail breakage or loss; inability to walk; bruising; difficultly clotting blood; difficulty healing from minimal injuries (cuts, scrapes, etc.); incontinence (inability to control one’s bowels, leading to ‘accidents’ in public places); cardiac arrhythmias (abnormal heartbeat); diarrhea; exhaustion; impaired ability to regulate body temperature and sweat production, increasing the risks of hypothermia and over-heating; inability to control urination; bed sores; arthritis; various diseases of the colon, many of which are fatal and necessitate the removal of most of the colon; gallstones; kidney stones; frequent nausea; uncontrolled projectile vomiting after meals (not self-induced purging, stomach will no longer accept food); hepatic problems (liver); memory loss; perforation of the stomach due to purging; tearing your esophagus (throat); choking or inhaling vomit during purging; coma; brain damage due to coma, electrolyte imbalance, etc.; dry skin; slow heart rate; diabetes; irritable bowel syndrome; stunted growth; low blood sugar (causes confusion, dizziness, aggression, fainting or collapsing, seizures, coma and death); low iron/anemia; impotence in males; edema (swelling); increased risk of various cancers; vision loss/disturbances; fainting; collapsing; injury due to fainting/collapsing; hearing loss; circulation problems, and risk of losing limbs as a result (gangrene); acid reflux; indigestion; pulmonary (lungs) symptoms; HIGH risk of kidney and urinary track infections; blockage in the bowels; dehydration; over-hydration (water poisoning); high cholesterol; loss of sex drive; low blood pressure (risk of multi-organ failure, fainting, etc.); spinal shrinkage (hunchback); internal bleeding; digestive track failure; constipation; nerve deterioration; shrinkage of the brain; heart shrinkage; overdose on “regular” adult dose for medication, due to inability to metabolize drugs; and, of course….

      Death.

      Which is definitely permanent.

  9. QUESTION:
    I need a good thesis statement for my introduction on Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome?
    any ideas? im writing about the PCOS what is, organs system, treatments, symptoms etc.

    • ANSWER:
      You can include the following information, in your thesis statement on PCOS :

      Polycystic ovary syndrome is a condition in which a woman has an imbalance of a female sex hormones. This may lead to menstrual cycle changes, cysts in the ovaries, trouble getting pregnant, and other health changes.
      Causes, incidence, and risk factors

      PCOS is linked to changes in the level of certain hormones:

      Estrogen and progesterone, the female hormones that help a woman’s ovaries release eggs

      Androgen, a male hormone found in small amounts in women

      It is not completely understood why or how the changes in the hormone levels occur. The changes make it harder for a woman’s ovaries to release fully grown (mature) eggs. Normally, one or more eggs are released during a woman’s period. This is called ovulation. In PCOS, mature eggs are not released from the ovaries. Instead, they can form very small cysts in the ovary.

      These changes can contribute to infertility. The other symptoms of this disorder are due to the hormone imbalances.

      Most of the time, PCOS is diagnosed in women in their 20s or 30s. However, it may also affect teenage girls. The symptoms often begin when a girl’s periods start. Women with this disorder often have a mother or sister who has symptoms similar to those of polycystic ovary syndrome.
      Symptoms

      Symptoms of PCOS include changes in your period (menstrual cycle). Some changes are:

      No period after you have had one or more normal ones during puberty (secondary amenorrhea)

      Irregular periods, that may come and go and may be very light to very heavy

      PCOS can cause you to develop male-like characteristics. This is called virilization. Symptoms include:

      Body hair growing on the chest, belly, face, and around the nipples

      Decreased breast size

      Enlargement of the clitoris

      Thinning of the hair on the head, called male-pattern baldness

      Voice gets deeper

      You may also have skin changes:

      Acne that gets worse

      Dark or thick skin markings and creases around the armpits, groin, neck, and breasts

      Signs and tests

      Your doctor or nurse will perform a physical exam. This will include a pelvic exam. This may reveal:

      Swollen ovaries

      Swollen clitoris (very rare)

      The following health conditions are common in women with PCOS:

      Diabetes

      High blood pressure

      High cholesterol

      Weight gain and obesity

      Your doctor or nurse will check your weight and body mass index (BMI) and measure your belly size.

      Blood tests can be done to check hormone levels. These tests may include:

      Estrogen level

      FSH level

      LH level

      Male hormone (testosterone) level

      17-ketosteroids

      Other blood tests that may be done include:

      Fasting glucose (blood sugar) and other tests for glucose intolerance and insulin resistance

      Lipid level

      Pregnancy test (serum HCG)

      Prolactin level

      Thyroid function tests

      Your doctor may also order the following imaging test or surgeries to look at your ovaries:

      Vaginal ultrasound

      Pelvic laparoscopy

      Treatment

      Weight gain and obesity is common in women with PCOS. Losing weight can help treat the hormone changes and health conditions such as diabetes, high blood pressure, or high cholesterol.

      Losing just 5% of your body weight can help your hormone imbalance and may make it easier to get pregnant. For an 160 pound woman, that’s just 8 pounds!

      Your doctor may recommend birth control pills to make your periods more regular. Such medicines may also help reduce abnormal hair growth after you take them for a few months.

      A diabetes medicine called glucophage (metformin) may also be recommended to:

      Make your periods regular

      Prevent type 2 diabetes

      Help you loss weight when you follow a healthy diet

  10. QUESTION:
    What are some medical reason why a women in her early 20′s can’t get pregnant?
    Please no smart ssɐ answers, or one sentence long explanation. The person with the best description or longest list of reasons, will be given best answer and my appreciation. :)

    • ANSWER:
      Here are some common problems:

      Ovulatory problems
      Approximately 25% of all infertile women have problems with ovulation1. The normal ovarian cycle is so complex that even small changes may disrupt the cycle and prevent ovulation.

      In most cases, hormonal imbalances, like not having enough of a certain hormone or not releasing a hormone at the right time, are the cause of the problem. Extremely low body weight, being overweight, or any significant change in weight (loss or gain) can also cause imbalances.2

      If you have an ovulation problem, your healthcare provider may choose to treat you with clomiphene citrate.

      Anatomical problems
      A variety of anatomical issues can cause infertility.

      Blocked fallopian tubes
      Sometimes a woman’s fallopian tubes become blocked because of past infections (pelvic inflammatory disease, for example), or by abdominal surgery. Sexually transmitted diseases can also scar or damage the fallopian tubes, causing blockages. 3

      Blockage can interfere with the sperm and egg uniting. If they do unite, blockages can prevent the embryo from implanting itself in the uterus. Often women with blocked fallopian tubes don’t experience any symptoms. Treatment of tubal problems or pelvic scarring may require specialized surgery, depending upon a woman’s situation. 4

      Cervical disorders
      When a woman isn’t ovulating, cervical mucus helps prevent infections entering the uterus. During ovulation, the thickness and quality of the mucus alters to allow sperm to pass through. Sometimes cervical problems can prevent the sperm from entering. 2

      Polycystic ovarian syndrome
      Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is one of the leading causes of infertility, affecting an estimated 5% to 10% of women of childbearing age. PCOS is a condition in which cysts develop in the ovaries due to abnormal hormone levels. The ovaries can then enlarge. Symptoms may include irregular or absent periods, high blood pressure, acne, elevated insulin levels, excess hair on the face and body, and weight problems.

  11. QUESTION:
    Could my daughter have a swollen lymph node?
    I have a daughter who is 12 months old, and about two weeks ago I noticed a lump on the back of her neck. It feels like it is slightly larger than a pea. It has not gone down in size at all. It is not visible by just looking at her neck. Could this be a swollen lymph node? If it is a swollen lymph node is there anything I can do about it? She seems like she is in pain anytime something is around her neck. Should I take her to the doctor?

    • ANSWER:
      First of all, please, don’t be panicky. Study it carefully and discuss with Ur family members/friends and implement it for a month. By His grace, let us wish, U shall be fine in a few weeks.

      Any lump*/lymph node enlargement*, in any part of the body on the skin, is a sign of blocked energy + toxins in the lymphatic system. It may be a cyst, tumor [benign/malignant]. If possible identify it properly or U may use both medicines alternatively mentioned hereunder, for the best possible cure in 45 days.

      Everyone MUST be aware of——–Any Cancer, lupus, HIV/AIDS, Kaposi’s Sarcoma, etc., —Common Symptoms:
      Sudden loss of weight/stamina, anemia, unbearable pains in any organ despite medication, neuralgia, severe hair loss [with excessive accumulated heat in the body], FATIGUE-getting extremely tired for a little or no work, loss of appetite, unhealed wound in any part of the body for years together, chronic constipation, chronic hemorrhages, etc. Cancer may affect from any organ to any organ[s]/system[s].

      1. Cyst*— Cyst. A cyst is a sac that may be filled with air, fluid or other material. A cyst can form in any part of the body, including bones, organs and soft tissues. Most cysts are non-cancerous (benign). Some common examples of cysts include sebaceous cysts, small bumps that form just beneath the skin, and ovarian cysts. It’s important to note, however, that nearly all cancers are capable of producing cysts. (A sac containing liquid secretion or pus).
      •2. Tumor*— Tumor. A tumor is an abnormal mass of tissue. Like a cyst, a tumor can form in any part of the body. A tumor can be benign or cancerous (malignant).
      To determine whether a cyst or tumor is benign or malignant, a sample of the affected tissue — or, in some cases, the entire suspicious area — is removed and studied under a microscope. This is known as a biopsy. A swelling on any of the cutaneous, mucous or serous surface of any part of the body of independent growth.
      •1. Cure for Cyst———–—Mixture of CF 3.x, CP 3x or 12x, CS 3x, NM 3x and S 12x.

      2.Cure for Tumor—-—Mature of CF 12x, CP 3x or 12x, CS 3x, KM 3x, KP 3x, KS 3x, NM 3x, NP 3x and S 12x. For small children’s bloody tumour-CF 3x is useful

      •Dosage*: 1 grain t.d.s.-sub-lingual.
      •All these biochemic salts/homeo medicines available @ local Homoeo shops, are safe and with side benefits. Don’t swallow medicine. The medicine to be dissolved on/under the tongue. Don’t take any thing 10 minutes before and 10 minutes after medication. You can take water.

      U may try both medicines alternatively. If not curable in 45 days, then
      anyways, U may see a general surgeon/local homeopath/dermatologist for physical examination, relevant investigations, accurate diagnosis and permanent cure by medication and or surgical interference.
      PS. If satisfied/benefited with, inform others to browse ‘Yahoo Answers’ on any health issue.
      Source: ‘HEALTH IN UR HANDS’ [Vol.I & II] available in all Indian Languages all over the globe] by Dr.Devendra Vora, DSc.,MD.,FRCP.,—an octogenarian & the pioneer in Acupressure in India.

  12. QUESTION:
    How serious are swollen neck lymph nodes?
    My neck hurts Soo bad under my jaw back by my ears, after reading up on it I’m pretty sure it’s my lymph nodes. I don’t have a fever, I don’t have a sore throat. A few days before the sore and pain in my neck started happening a few small chicken pox like dots appeared (Ive had chicken pox before though so its not that). Anybody have any information? My neck hurts when I turn it, and when I touch it in those areas.

    • ANSWER:
      First of all, please, don’t be panicky. Study it carefully and discuss with Ur family members/friends and implement it for a month. By His grace, let us wish, U shall be fine in a few weeks.

      Any lump*/lymph node enlargement*, in any part of the body on the skin, is a sign of blocked energy + toxins in the lymphatic system. It may be a cyst, tumor [benign/malignant]. If possible identify it properly or U may use both medicines alternatively mentioned hereunder, for the best possible cure in 45 days.

      Everyone MUST be aware of——–Any Cancer, lupus, HIV/AIDS, Kaposi’s Sarcoma, etc., — Common Symptoms:
      Sudden loss of weight/stamina, anemia, unbearable pains in any organ despite medication, neuralgia, severe hair loss [with excessive accumulated heat in the body], FATIGUE-getting extremely tired for a little or no work, loss of appetite, unhealed wound in any part of the body for years together, chronic constipation, chronic hemorrhages, etc. Cancer may affect from any organ to any organ[s]/system[s].

      1. Cyst*— Cyst. A cyst is a sac that may be filled with air, fluid or other material. A cyst can form in any part of the body, including bones, organs and soft tissues. Most cysts are non-cancerous (benign). Some common examples of cysts include sebaceous cysts, small bumps that form just beneath the skin, and ovarian cysts. It’s important to note, however, that nearly all cancers are capable of producing cysts. (A sac containing liquid secretion or pus).
      •2. Tumor*— Tumor. A tumor is an abnormal mass of tissue. Like a cyst, a tumor can form in any part of the body. A tumor can be benign or cancerous (malignant).
      To determine whether a cyst or tumor is benign or malignant, a sample of the affected tissue — or, in some cases, the entire suspicious area — is removed and studied under a microscope. This is known as a biopsy. A swelling on any of the cutaneous, mucous or serous surface of any part of the body of independent growth.
      •1. Cure for Cyst———–—Mixture of CF 3.x, CP 3x or 12x, CS 3x, NM 3x and S 12x.

      2.Cure for Tumor—-—Mature of CF 12x, CP 3x or 12x, CS 3x, KM 3x, KP 3x, KS 3x, NM 3x, NP 3x and S 12x. For small children’s bloody tumour-CF 3x is useful

      •Dosage*: 2 grains t.d.s.
      •All these biochemic salts/homeo medicines available @ local Homoeo shops, are safe and with side benefits. Don’t swallow medicine. The medicine to be dissolved on/under the tongue. Don’t take any thing 10 minutes before and 10 minutes after medication. You can take water.

      U may try both medicines alternatively. If not curable in 45 days, then
      anyways, U may see a general surgeon/local homeopath/dermatologist for physical examination, relevant investigations, accurate diagnosis and permanent cure by medication and or surgical interference.
      PS. If satisfied/benefited with, inform others to browse ‘Yahoo Answers’ on any health issue.
      Source: ‘HEALTH IN UR HANDS’ [Vol.I & II] available in all Indian Languages all over the globe] by Dr.Devendra Vora, DSc.,MD.,FRCP.,—an octogenarian & the pioneer in Acupressure in India.

  13. QUESTION:
    How does a polycistic cyst form? What should i expect after surgery?
    I have 2 cyst one on each ovary i have talked to alot of people but none with 2 I was wondering if anyone had this procedure done and give me insight as to what to expect after surgery. I really would like to hear from someone who had 2 removed at the same time, however any feed back will be helpful even if you never experienced this but have knowledge on the matter.

    Thank You

    • ANSWER:
      Polycystic ovarian syndrome
      Female reproductive organs

      Alternative Names
      Stein-Leventhal syndrome, polycystic ovarian disorder, hyperandrogenic chronic anovulation

      Definition
      Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is a disorder that results in abnormal hormone levels in a woman. In a normal ovary, a single egg develops and is released during ovulation each month. A polycystic ovary will have many eggs that are never released.

      What is going on in the body?
      Polycystic ovarian syndrome often begins with puberty and worsens with time. The cause of PCOS has not yet been completely identified. The symptoms of PCOS are related to an excess of the hormone androgen. This hormone can cause male features such as facial hair and male-pattern baldness in women. Polycystic ovaries may be normal in size, or they may be enlarged, with smooth, thick coverings.

      What are the signs and symptoms of the disease?
      The symptoms of polycystic ovarian syndrome include:

      * acne
      * amenorrhea, or the lack of menstruation
      * excess body hair
      * infertility
      * obesity
      * scanty or irregular menstruation

      What are the treatments for the disease?
      There are many ways to treat polycystic ovarian syndrome, depending on a woman’s symptoms. Treatment can include:

      * bleaching, electrolysis, waxing, and other cosmetic treatment of unwanted hair
      * diet and exercise for weight loss
      * infertility treatments
      * oral contraceptives and progesterone to regulate menstrual periods and reduce male hormone levels
      * spironolactone, a mild diuretic that blocks the effects of male hormones
      * surgery, such as ovarian wedge resection or ovarian drilling

      Newer treatments focus on lowering insulin levels in the blood. This may help reduce the production of male hormones. It may also lessen the symptoms of PCOS. Metformin is one medicine that has been used for this.

      What are the side effects of the treatments?
      Surgery may cause bleeding, infection, and allergic reaction to anesthesia. Medicine side effects will vary, but they include allergic reactions.

      What happens after treatment for the disease?
      The symptoms of polycystic ovarian syndrome can often be managed over time with proper treatment.

  14. QUESTION:
    Is it possible for a women to get pregnant with to much testosterone in her body?
    I have hirsutism and possibly PCOS also. I am wanting to have a child and do not have the money for all the infertility testing that insurance doesn’t cover and that doctor’s want paid for up front. Is it at all possible to concieve a child?

    • ANSWER:
      It is possible! Here’s an article that might help you:

      First of all, what is PCOS?
      PCOS is an endocrine syndrome. Some of the characteristics include, but are not limited to, the abnormal release of luteinizing and follicle stimulating hormones, irregular menstrual cycles, insulin resistance, excessive body hair growth, miscarriage, acne, and weight issues.

      PCOS gets its name from the tiny cysts that form inside the ovaries. These cysts are actually eggs prevented from being released by the abnormal hormone levels.

      PCOS is generally hereditary from both the mother’s side and/or the father’s side.

      How Can PCOS Be Treated So That You Can Conceive?(Information provided by 4woman.gov)
      Because there is no cure for PCOS, it needs to be managed to prevent problems. Treatments are based on the symptoms each patient is having and whether she wants to conceive or needs contraception. Below are descriptions of treatments used for PCOS.

      Birth control pills. For women who don’t want to become pregnant, birth control pills can regulate menstrual cycles, reduce male hormone levels, and help to clear acne. However, the birth control pill does not cure PCOS. The menstrual cycle will become abnormal again if the pill is stopped. Women may also think about taking a pill that only has progesterone, like Provera, to regulate the menstrual cycle and prevent endometrial problems. But progesterone alone does not help reduce acne and hair growth.

      Diabetes Medications. The medicine, Metformin, also called Glucophage, which is used to treat type 2 diabetes, also helps with PCOS symptoms. Metformin affects the way insulin regulates glucose and decreases the testosterone production. Abnormal hair growth will slow down and ovulation may return after a few months of use. These medications will not cause a person to become diabetic.

      Fertility Medications. The main fertility problem for women with PCOS is the lack of ovulation. Even so, her husband’s sperm count should be checked and her tubes checked to make sure they are open before fertility medications are used. Clomiphene (pills) and Gonadotropins (shots) can be used to stimulate the ovary to ovulate. PCOS patients are at increased risk for multiple births when using these medications. In vitro Fertilization (IVF) is sometimes recommended to control the chance of having triplets or more. Metformin can be taken with fertility medications and helps to make PCOS women ovulate on lower doses of medication.

      Medicine for increased hair growth or extra male hormones. If a woman is not trying to get pregnant there are some other medicines that may reduce hair growth. Spironolactone is a blood pressure medicine that has been shown to decrease the male hormone’s effect on hair. Propecia, a medicine taken by men for hair loss, is another medication that blocks this effect. Both of these medicines can affect the development of a male fetus and should not be taken if pregnancy is possible. Other non-medical treatments such as electrolysis or laser hair removal are effective at getting rid of hair. A woman with PCOS can also take hormonal treatment to keep new hair from growing.

      Surgery. Although it is not recommended as the first course of treatment, surgery called ovarian drilling is available to induce ovulation. The doctor makes a very small incision above or below the navel, and inserts a small instrument that acts like a telescope into the abdomen. This is called laparoscopy. The doctor then punctures the ovary with a small needle carrying an electric current to destroy a small portion of the ovary. This procedure carries a risk of developing scar tissue on the ovary. This surgery can lower male hormone levels and help with ovulation. But these effects may only last a few months. This treatment doesn’t help with increased hair growth and loss of scalp hair.

      A healthy weight. Maintaining a healthy weight is another way women can help manage PCOS. Since obesity is common with PCOS, a healthy diet and physical activity help maintain a healthy weight, which will help the body lower glucose levels, use insulin more efficiently, and may help restore a normal period. Even loss of 10% of her body weight can help make a woman’s cycle more regular.

      PCOS Tips
      Most PCOS sufferers are ‘carbohydrate sensitive’, which means that, because of your PCOS, your body cannot cope with starchy, sugary or high-carbohydrate food. If you eat this type of food, it can make you crave more, hence the reason that PCOS sufferers go on a ‘binge’. Your are best keeping to a low-fat, low-sugar, low-carbohydrate, protein diet, with a balance of fresh fruit and vegetables and lots of nibbles. Personal diets can be prepared if you wish.

      If you are overweight and you want to conceive a baby, consultants now agree that losing weight healthily, with a well-balanced diet, that provides all the vitamins that you need, will improve your chances of conceiving. Figures show that just losing 24 lbs, if you are seriously overweight, can improve your chances of conceiving very considerably.

      At all costs avoid sugar. Please remember that, you can have an insulin problem when you suffer with PCOS, and eating sugar can aggravate the problem. It is much better to use the ‘sugar – free’ alternatives.

      When seeking treatment for conception, see a specialist. The speicalist would be known as a Reproductive Endocrinoligist. These fertility doctors have extra training and education that ob/gyns do not have.

  15. QUESTION:
    i have not gotten my period in about 6 months and i think the reason may be because of my recent 20 pound?
    weight loss. i do have an eating disorder (which i am working very hard to overcome) but it is not too extreme. i was thinking this was the reason for my irregular periods, but then i realized that before i started my irregular eating habits i had irregular periods as well. once i start eating more normally do you htink they will come back? and i am 17 at the moment and by the time i want to have children do you think i will have any problems? please give me your input!

    • ANSWER:
      This could be: Polycystic (pah-lee-SIS-tik) ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a health problem that can affect a woman’s menstrual cycle, ability to have children, hormones, heart, blood vessels, and appearance. With PCOS, women typically have:

      high levels of androgens (AN-druh-junz). These are sometimes called male hormones, although females also make them.
      missed or irregular periods
      many small cysts (sists) in their ovaries. Cysts are fluid-filled sacs.

      About one in ten women of childbearing age has PCOS. It can occur in girls as young as 11 years old. PCOS is the most common cause of female infertility (not being able to get pregnant).

      The cause of PCOS is unknown. Most researchers think that more than one factor could play a role in developing PCOS. Genes are thought to be one factor. Women with PCOS tend to have a mother or sister with PCOS. Researchers also think insulin could be linked to PCOS. Insulin is a hormone that controls the change of sugar, starches, and other food into energy for the body to use or store. For many women with PCOS, their bodies have problems using insulin so that too much insulin is in the body. Excess insulin appears to increase production of androgen. This hormone is made in fat cells, the ovaries, and the adrenal gland. Levels of androgen that are higher than normal can lead to acne, excessive hair growth, weight gain, and problems with ovulation.

      Most researchers think that PCOS runs in families. Women with PCOS tend to have a mother or sister with PCOS. Still, there is no proof that PCOS is inherited.

      Not all women with PCOS share the same symptoms. These are some of the symptoms of PCOS:

      infrequent menstrual periods, no menstrual periods, and/or irregular bleeding
      infertility (not able to get pregnant) because of not ovulating
      increased hair growth on the face, chest, stomach, back, thumbs, or toes—a condition called hirsutism (HER-suh-tiz-um)
      ovarian cysts
      acne, oily skin, or dandruff
      weight gain or obesity, usually carrying extra weight around the waist
      insulin resistance or type 2 diabetes
      high cholesterol
      high blood pressure
      male-pattern baldness or thinning hair
      patches of thickened and dark brown or black skin on the neck, arms, breasts, or thighs
      skin tags, or tiny excess flaps of skin in the armpits or neck area
      pelvic pain
      anxiety or depression due to appearance and/or infertility
      sleep apnea—excessive snoring and times when breathing stops while asleep

      The ovaries are two small organs, one on each side of a woman’s uterus. A woman’s ovaries have follicles, which are tiny sacs filled with liquid that hold the eggs. These sacs also are called cysts. Each month about 20 eggs start to mature, but usually only one matures fully. As this one egg grows, the follicle accumulates fluid in it. When that egg matures, the follicle breaks open to release it. The egg then travels through the fallopian tube for fertilization. When the single egg leaves the follicle, ovulation takes place.

      In women with PCOS, the ovary doesn’t make all of the hormones it needs for any of the eggs to fully mature. Follicles may start to grow and build up fluid. But no one follicle becomes large enough. Instead, some follicles may remain as cysts. Since no follicle becomes large enough and no egg matures or is released, ovulation does not occur and the hormone progesterone is not made. Without progesterone, a woman’s menstrual cycle is irregular or absent. Plus, the cysts make male hormones, which also prevent ovulation.

      Because PCOS affects many systems in the body, many symptoms persist even though ovarian function and hormone levels change as a woman nears menopause. For instance, excessive hair growth continues, and male pattern baldness or thinning hair gets worse after menopause. Also, the risks of complications from PCOS, such as heart attack, stroke and diabetes, increase as a woman gets older.

      There is no single test to diagnose PCOS. Your doctor will take a medical history, perform a physical exam, and possibly take some tests to rule out other causes of your symptoms. During the physical exam the doctor will want to measure your blood pressure, body mass index (BMI), and waist size. He or she also will check out the areas of increased hair growth, so try to allow the natural hair growth for a few days before the visit. Your doctor might want to do a pelvic exam to see if your ovaries are enlarged or swollen by the increased number of small cysts. A vaginal ultrasound also might be used to examine the ovaries for cysts and check out the endometrium, the lining of the uterus. The uterine lining may become thicker if your periods are not regular. You also might have blood taken to check your hormone levels and to measure glucose (sugar) levels.

      Because there is no cure for PCOS, it needs to be managed to prevent problems. Treatment goals are based on your symptoms, whether or not you want to become pregnant, and lowering your chances of getting heart disease and diabetes. Many women will need a combination of treatments to meet these goals.

  16. QUESTION:
    Every month Since December I have two days where I am constantly being sick. What could it be? I?
    I have also noticed my hair falling out. I have a medium sized bald patch at the back of my head. Im 27. I am a veggie but apart from this I am pretty fit, I regularly exercise.

    • ANSWER:
      Causes of Hormonal Imbalance in Women

      Estrogen and progesterone are the two most important female hormones. A hormonal imbalance occurs when the ratio of these two hormones deviate from their normal levels. Most commonly, estrogen is the one that tends to increase and this is known as ‘estrogen dominance’. This may cause hormonal imbalance in teenage girls as well. So, what causes hormonal imbalance in young women? Hormonal imbalance in young women is caused due to the following reasons –
      •Over nutrition
      •Malnutrition
      •Erratic lifestyle
      •Early onset of menopause
      •Phytoestrogens present in food
      •Use of birth control and contraceptive pills
      •Stress and tension
      •Thyroid problems
      •Ovarian failure
      •Environmental chemicals
      In older women, hormonal imbalance is caused mainly due to menopause and can be identified on the onset of menopausal symptoms.

      Women may start experiencing hormonal imbalance when they are in their 30s or 40s.

      Symptoms and Effects of Hormonal Imbalance in Young Women

      Listed below are some of the symptoms and effects of hormonal imbalance in young women and hormone imbalance symptoms teenagers.
      •Uterine fibroids
      •Water retention/bloating
      •Irregular periods
      •PMS
      •Atherosclerosis
      •Polycystic ovary syndrome or ovarian cysts
      •Fibrocystic breasts
      •Endometriosis
      •Night sweats
      •Vaginal dryness
      •Diminished sex drive
      •Mood swings
      •Irritability
      •Cyclical migraine headaches
      •Obesity or sudden weight gain
      •Chronic fatigue syndrome
      •Premenstrual asthma
      •Hormonal headache
      •Hair loss
      •Short-term memory loss
      •Lack of concentration
      Identifying Hormonal Imbalance in Young Women

      Apart from the above symptoms of hormonal imbalance in young women, an accurate way to diagnose hormonal imbalance is a basic blood test. You should look for follicle stimulating hormone levels, estradiol, thyroxine and thyrotropin levels in the blood test reports.

      Treatment of Hormonal Imbalance in Young Women

      It is possible to treat hormonal imbalance and the associated disorders of hormonal imbalance in young women. Treatment needs to be administered, depending upon the cause of hormonal imbalance. The cause needs to be treated along with the hormonal imbalance. Hormonal imbalance caused due to thyroid malfunctioning, is treated by administering a daily dose of natural or synthetic hormones. These hormones regulate the thyroid gland which then produces the appropriate levels of hormones. Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is another form of treatment used to treat hormonal imbalance, caused due to ovarian failure.

      Other alternative treatments include consuming nutritional supplements, inculcating healthy lifestyle habits like, avoiding alcohol and smoking, consuming a healthy diet and incorporating exercise into the daily routine. It is also essential to maintain optimum weight levels to treat hormonal imbalance. Many lifestyle changes and going for a natural hormone imbalance treatment for teen girls or young women can help.

  17. QUESTION:
    Women who have used implanon, can you give me a review?
    I’m 16 and I’m horrible at keeping track of taking pills. My mom and I completely decided that was a no go. I used the nuva ring, but I felt like it made me way too emotional. I’ve looked at a lot of people that have used the implanon, and they said that it gives you horrible bleeding and you gain a decent amount of weight. How do you feel about implanon? It seems great since it works for 3 years.

    • ANSWER:
      Everyone’s reaction to a medicine is different. It is difficult to predict which side-effects you will have from taking a particular medicine, or whether you will have any side-effects at all. The important thing is to tell your prescriber or pharmacist if you are having problems with your medicine.

      Very common: More than 1 in 10 people who take Implanon

      acne
      breast pain or tenderness
      headaches
      irregular menstrual periods – seek medical advice if you continue to have irregular bleeding
      vaginal infections
      weight gain

      Common: More than 1 in 100 people who take Implanon

      appetite gain
      changes in emotions
      decreased libido
      depression
      feeling dizzy
      feeling nervous
      flatulence
      flu or flu-like symptoms
      hair loss
      heavy or painful menstrual periods
      hot flushes
      implant site problems such as pain
      nausea
      ovarian cyst
      pain
      stomachpain
      tiredness
      weight loss

      Uncommon: More than 1 in 1000 people who take Implanon

      back pain
      breast enlargement
      constipation
      diarrhoea
      difficulty sleeping
      feeling anxious
      fever
      galactorrhoea
      genital discharge or itching
      hair overgrowth
      hypersensitivity reactions
      itching
      migraine
      muscle, joint and bonepain
      oedema
      painful urination
      pharyngitis
      rhinitis
      skin rash or rashes
      sleepiness
      urinary tractinfection
      vaginal and vulval discomfort
      vomiting

      The frequency of these side-effects is unknown

      abscess, fibrosis or scarring at the site of insertion
      angioedema or worsening of angioedema
      bruising, irritation, pain or itching at the time of insertion or removal of Implanon
      decreased glucose tolerance
      ectopic pregnancy – seek medical advice if you have stomachpain or amenorrhoea
      increased growth of ovarian follicles
      liver problems
      movement or expulsion of Implanon – this may also happen if there is inflammation at the site of insertion
      paraesthesiae
      raised blood pressure
      urticaria

      The frequency of these side-effects is unknown and has been reported in women who have taken combined oral contraceptives

      chloasma – seek medical advice if you develop chloasma. If you are prone to having chloasma, you should avoid exposure to the sun or ultraviolet light while using Implanon
      hormone-sensitive cancers such as breast cancer or livertumour
      may affect the results for certain tests
      thromboembolic problems such as deep vein thrombosis, arterial thromboembolism or pulmonary embolism – these problems may return in women who have a history of thromboembolic problems
      worsening of conditions that may occur during pregnancy or hormone treatment. These include: jaundice, itching, skin rashes, gallstones, porphyria, systemic lupus erythematosus, chorea, blood problems or hearing loss due to otosclerosis. Seek medical advice if you get any of these conditions

  18. QUESTION:
    Does anyone have Polycystic ovarian syndrome?
    I am not overweight but I have read some articles about polycystic ovarian syndrome which say that one side effect is weight gain. Does anyone have it who aren’t overweight but have stopped having their period and have some unusual hair growth? Thank you for your help.

    • ANSWER:
      I have PCOS but was very underweight until I started packing it on at age 34, I have gained 50 lbs.. I also did not have any trouble conceiving quite the opposite. Not everyone has every symptom, I had very high testosterone, facial hair, mild hair loss, dark skin patches, the weight gain and troublesome multiple cysts on my ovaries, and heart disease. Not due to poor diet.

  19. QUESTION:
    What can Saw Palmetto do for my hair?
    I know its good for prostate health, but also i’ve heard it can block the hair loss hormone DHT (dihydrotestosterone). Does anyone know? Thanks to all who help :-)

    • ANSWER:
      I’ve heard about this supplement……..but our group haven’t had much success with this particular supplement……..however…..that don’t mean……..it don’t work.

      This is some of the information I found:

      Saw Palmetto
      Saw palmetto is widely used for the treatment of enlarged prostate glands in men. It is thought that prostate glands become enlarged primarily because of a metabolite of testosterone, called dihydrotestosterone, or DHT. Women with PCOS (polycystic ovarian syndrome) also tend to have higher levels of testosterone and DHT than other women. Therefore, what works for men may also work for women.

      Saw palmetto appears to reduce DHT in three different ways:
      Inhibits DHT production.
      Inhibits the binding of DHT to its cell receptors.
      Promotes the breakdown of DHT.
      Testosterone is converted into DHT by an enzyme called 5-alpha-reductase. 5-alpha-reductase is inhibited by saw palmetto, and thus less DHT is produced and hirsutism may be reduced.

      Saw palmetto may help with the following PCOS symptoms:
      Hirsutism (too much hair in the wrong places)
      Male pattern baldness or hair loss.

      Saw Palmetto Side Effects and Precautions
      No significant side effects have been noted in clinical trials with this herbal extract, except for rare headache or stomach upset if taken on an empty stomach. Because of possible hormonal activity, it is not recommended for women who are pregnant or breast-feeding.

      How Much Should You Take?
      As a general guideline, a common dose for men is 320 mg. of extract per day, standardized to at least 85-95% fatty acids with a guaranteed minimum of 0.2-0.4% sterols. (“Standardized” means you get the same amount of active ingredients every time). You may decide to start with a somewhat lower dose.

      In men, it can be taken for six weeks before any effect is noticed. If improvement is noted, it is recommended that men take it continuously. Since you’re trying to reduce DHT like the men are, you could do the same.

      This is the link for more Info:

      http://www.ovarian-cysts-pcos.com/saw-palmetto-description.html

      I would rather you try the supplement of MSM 500mg along with the use of our one pill supplement Vitol (hair/nail and skin supplement) We Know this work……..here is some information and the link:

      Vitol Hair/Nails/Skin 120T
      Retail Price: .95
      Your Price: .70

      Description
      Hair Nails-Skin contains vitamins, minerals and herbs
      with L-cysteine, silicon and biotin to support skin,
      nails and hair strength and vitality.

      Supplement Facts
      Amount Per Serving %DV
      Vitamin A 25000IU *
      Vitamin D 1000IU *
      Vitamin E 60IU *
      Vitamin C 300mg *
      Folic Acid 400mg *
      Thiamin 5mg *
      Riboflavin 5mg *
      Niacin 50mg *
      Vitamin B6 5mg *
      Vitamin B12 25mcg *
      Pantothenic Acid 50mg *
      Biotin 50mcg *
      Para Amino Benzoic Acid 50mg *
      Calcium 150mg *
      Phosphorus 100mg *
      Zinc 22.5g *
      Chromium 100mcg *
      Selenium 50mcg *
      Iodine 225mcg *
      Magnesium 100mg *
      Iron 10mg *
      Silicon 900mcg *
      Manganese 2mg *
      Potassium 95mg *
      Cysteine 20mcg *
      Bioflavonoid Complex 75mg *
      herbal/trace elements 500mg *
      *Daily Value (DV) not established

      Contains
      14 Vitamins, 74 Minerals, Trace Minerals, 15 Herbs with
      Cysteine & Silcon plus.Suggested UseAs a dietary
      supplement, one tablet morning and evening.

      Other Ingredients
      Capsicum, Echinacea, Chamomile, Comfrey, Golden Seal, Gotu
      Kola, Hawthorn, Hyssop, Kelp, Licorice, Myrrh Gum, Sarsaparilla,
      Shavegrass, Valerian, Yucca, plus 74 naturally chelated Minerals
      and Trace Minerals in trace amounts

      Does Not Contain
      Starch, Sugar, Salt, Corn, Yeast, Wheat, Soy, Milk Derivatives,
      Synthetic Excipients (Binders, Waxes, Fillers, Lubricants,
      Disintegrators, Granulating Agents, Colors, Flavors) and Without
      The Use Of Toxic Chemical Solvents Or Preservatives.

      Warnings / Cautions
      Keep in cool, dry place. Vitamin batches may vary in color due
      to the maturity of its natural sources.

      http://www.webvitamins.com/product.aspx?id=16124&wvaid=IN&term=nextag

      I hope this helps

      Victory of Creativehairillusions

  20. QUESTION:
    Is there any medication that could make my period regular?
    Trying to have a baby and it is not easy to time relationships when I don’t know when I ovulat…..

    • ANSWER:
      go to http://www.mymonthlycycles.com and it will tell you when you will be fertile and ovulating based on your last period.

      You can get pregnant when you do have irregular periods. Only birth control pills will regulate your periods.

      Irregular Periods
      Irregular periods aren’t unusual – they affect about 30% of women in their reproductive years. An irregular period is any type of bleeding that is abnormal when compared to your usual menstrual cycle. This can include a late period, an early period or bleeding between periods. It can also appear as particularly heavy bleeding (menorrhagia) or scanty bleeding. Many women also experience irregular periods in the form of a missed period, continuous periods, or periods that occur twice in one cycle.

      Causes of Irregular Periods
      Irregular menstrual periods are usually the result of hormonal signals that have been thrown out of sync. In order to produce a period, your body makes hormones, like estrogen and progesterone. These hormones are kept in the hypothalamus, pituitary gland, and ovaries inside your body. In order to trigger ovulation and menstruation, these parts of the body need to send signals to one another. Sometimes, these signals get crossed or skipped, causing irregular periods.

      But what causes these hormone signals to get out of whack? Well, there are actually a number of things that can easily cause your hormone levels to change.

      Pregnancy: If you are pregnant, your body will begin producing different levels of hormones. This will cause numerous pregnancy symptoms, including an end to your period.
      Stress: Stress is a common cause of irregular periods. If you are fatigued, worried, or anxious this can cause your hormones to become unbalanced.
      Diet: A poor diet or extreme weight loss or gain can also affect your hormones. Women with anorexia or bulimia often have no period or irregular periods.
      Exercise: Intense exercise can wreak havoc on your body, often causing irregular periods.
      Menarche: the cycles after a girl’s first period may be irregular for some time. It can take up to 3 years to get regular periods.
      Menopause: Menopause causes changes in your hormone levels, and is often signaled by irregular periods.
      Hormonal Birth Control: Birth control pills and irregular periods sometimes go hand in hand. It can take a while for your body to adjust to the new levels of hormones delivered by hormonal birth control.

      Complications
      For most women, an irregular period is nothing to be worried about; the majority of women will eventually develop a regular cycle with regular periods. Sometimes though, underlying complications can be the cause of these period problems. If you are noticing particularly irregular periods, or have gone a year or more with missed periods, see your health care professional. If you experience extreme cramping, heavy period bleeding, dizziness, nausea, or fainting you should also visit with your health care provider.

      Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
      Polycystic ovary syndrome, or PCOS, is a fairly common complication, affecting about 10% of all women. PCOS causes cysts to form on the ovaries, interfering with regular ovulation. Symptoms of this syndrome include: excessive hair growth, weight gain, acne, dandruff, high blood pressure, and infertility. If you display any of the symptoms, you may want to make an appointment to get checked for PCOS. Left untreated, it can lead to other more serious complications, including endometriosis, heart disease, and ovarian cancer.

      Inflammatory Bowel Disease
      Inflammatory bowel disease causes inflammation of the lower intestines (also known as the bowel). It is linked with irregular periods, and may also be accompanied by symptoms of weight loss, abdominal pain, and diarrhea. Inflammatory bowel disease can become severe, and sometimes requires hospitalization or surgery. If you have any of these symptoms, ask your doctor to check you for inflammatory bowel disease.

      Treating Irregular Periods
      Depending on the cause of your irregular periods, there may or may not be much you can do about them. If you have only been experiencing irregular periods for a short time (less than 7 months), it is likely that your periods will become regular again on their own. However, if there is an underlying medical condition that is causing your irregular periods, then receiving treatment for the condition should help to get your periods back on track. If you find that irregular periods are becoming annoying, there are some things that you can try to help regulate your hormones.

      Reduce your stress levels. Take time to meditate, relax, or just hang out. This may help put your cycle back on track.
      Get help for your eating disorder. If you are anorexic, bulimic, or if you suffer from other types of disordered eating, you must seek help. Not only will these eating disorders interrupt your menstrual cycle, but they can also severely affect your liver, bowel, throat, and heart functions.
      Don’t over exercise. While it is important to exercise regularly and keep fit, exercising too much can be problematic. If you are an endurance athlete, try to cut back on your training a little bit, until your irregular periods return to normal.

      Medical Treatments
      There are a few medical treatments which may be helpful in regulating your period:

      Hormonal Contraceptives: Hormonal contraceptives are often used to help regulate menstrual cycles. These contraceptives combine estrogen and progesterone and maintain your body’s hormones at specific and balanced levels. They are available by prescription and come in oral, patch, ring, and injectable forms.

      Hormone Supplements: If you have a specific hormone problem, such as overproduction of testosterone, hormonal supplements may be able to help regulate your periods. Speak with your health care provider for more information

  21. QUESTION:
    what is the difference between the symptoms of PCOS and pituitary tumor?

    • ANSWER:
      Signs and symptoms
      Common symptoms of PCOS include

      Oligomenorrhea, amenorrhea – irregular, few, or absent menstrual periods; cycles that do occur may comprise heavy bleeding (heavy bleeding is also an early warning sign of endometrial cancer, for which women with PCOS are at higher risk)
      Infertility, generally resulting from chronic anovulation (lack of ovulation)
      Elevated serum (blood) levels of androgens (male hormones), specifically testosterone, androstenedione, and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS), causing hirsutism and occasionally masculinization
      Central obesity – “apple-shaped” obesity centered around the lower half of the torso
      Androgenic alopecia (male-pattern baldness)
      Acne, oily skin, seborrhea
      Acanthosis nigricans (dark patches of skin, tan to dark brown or black)
      Acrochordons (skin tags) – tiny flaps of skin
      Prolonged periods of PMS-like symptoms (bloating, mood swings, pelvic pain, backaches)
      Sleep apnea
      Mild symptoms of hyperandrogenism, such as acne or hyperseborrhea, are frequent in adolescent girls, and are often associated with irregular menstrual cycles. In most instances, these symptoms are transient and only reflect the immaturity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovary axis during the first years following menarche. [1]

      Signs are:

      Multiple cysts on the ovaries (one form of ovarian cyst). Sonographically they may look like a string of pearls.
      Enlarged ovaries, generally 1.5 to 3 times larger than normal, resulting from multiple cysts
      Thickened, smooth, pearl-white outer surface of ovary
      The ratio of LH (Luteinizing hormone) to FSH (Follicle stimulating hormone) is greater than 1:1, as tested on Day 3 of the menstrual cycle.
      High levels of testosterone.
      Low levels of sex hormone binding globulin.
      Hyperinsulinemia

      Signs and symptoms
      Pituitary tumors that produce hormones are called functioning tumors. Tumors that don’t produce hormones are known as nonfunctioning pituitary tumors.

      Different types of functioning tumors can develop in your pituitary gland, each causing specific signs and symptoms:

      Adrenocorticotropic hormone-producing tumors. These pituitary tumors produce the hormone adrenocorticotropin, which stimulates your adrenal glands to make the hormone cortisol. When your adrenal glands produce too much cortisol, a condition called Cushing’s syndrome occurs. Signs and symptoms of Cushing’s syndrome may include weight gain around your midsection and upper back, exaggerated facial roundness, a characteristic hump on the upper part of your back, high blood pressure, muscle weakness and thinning of your skin.
      Growth hormone-producing tumors. These tumors produce excess growth hormone. The physical effects from excess growth hormone (acromegaly) may include coarsened facial features, enlarged hands and feet, high blood pressure and heart problems. Accelerated and excessive growth (gigantism) may occur in children.
      Prolactin-producing tumors. Overproduction of prolactin from a pituitary tumor (prolactinoma) can cause a decrease in normal levels of sex hormones — estrogen in women and testosterone in men. Excessive prolactin in the blood (hyperprolactinemia) can affect men and women differently.

      In women, prolactinoma may cause irregular menstrual periods (oligomenorrhea), lack of menstrual periods (amenorrhea) and milky discharge from the breasts (galactorrhea).

      In men, a prolactin-producing tumor may cause male hypogonadism, which may involve signs and symptoms such as enlarged breasts (gynecomastia), erectile dysfunction (ED) or impotence, infertility, decrease in body hair, and loss of interest in sexual activity.

      Thyroid-stimulating hormone-producing tumors. When a pituitary tumor overproduces thyroid-stimulating hormone, your thyroid gland makes too much of the hormone thyroxine. This is a rare cause of hyperthyroidism, or overactive thyroid disease. Hyperthyroidism can accelerate your body’s metabolism, causing sudden weight loss, a rapid or irregular heartbeat, and nervousness or irritability.
      Functioning and nonfunctioning pituitary tumors may cause other signs and symptoms, including:

      Headache
      Vision changes, such as decreased peripheral vision or double vision
      Seizures
      Clear, watery nasal drainage
      Hair loss
      Cold intolerance
      Constipation
      Irritability
      Weakness
      Fatigue
      Nausea
      Vomiting
      Low blood pressure
      Unintended weight loss or gain

  22. QUESTION:
    Hard pea sized swollen lymph node above right collarbone?
    Hi. I am 17 years old female.1 week before i got this Hard pea sized swollen lymph node above right collarbone and i immediately consulted a doctor. But his medicines didnt worked at all. With this i have cough and running nose and i feel pain in left kidney sometimes, and even i feel fatigue, tiredness without doing any work. These things are very unusual to me. But I don’t have lymph nodes on any other part of body. What is it? I am really confused?

    • ANSWER:
      First of all, please, don’t be panicky. Study it carefully and discuss with Ur family members/friends and implement it for a month. By His grace, let us wish, U shall be fine in a few weeks.

      Any lump*/lymph node enlargement*, in any part of the body on the skin, is a sign of blocked energy + toxins in the lymphatic system. It may be a cyst, tumor [benign/malignant]. If possible identify it properly or U may use both medicines alternatively mentioned hereunder, for the best possible cure in 45 days.

      Everyone MUST be aware of——–Any Cancer, lupus, HIV/AIDS, Kaposi’s Sarcoma, etc., —Common Symptoms:
      Sudden loss of weight/stamina, anemia, unbearable pains in any organ despite medication, neuralgia, severe hair loss [with excessive accumulated heat in the body], FATIGUE-getting extremely tired for a little or no work, loss of appetite, unhealed wound in any part of the body for years together, chronic constipation, chronic hemorrhages, etc. Cancer may affect from any organ to any organ[s]/system[s].

      1. Cyst*— Cyst. A cyst is a sac that may be filled with air, fluid or other material. A cyst can form in any part of the body, including bones, organs and soft tissues. Most cysts are non-cancerous (benign). Some common examples of cysts include sebaceous cysts, small bumps that form just beneath the skin, and ovarian cysts. It’s important to note, however, that nearly all cancers are capable of producing cysts. (A sac containing liquid secretion or pus).
      •2. Tumor*— Tumor. A tumor is an abnormal mass of tissue. Like a cyst, a tumor can form in any part of the body. A tumor can be benign or cancerous (malignant).
      To determine whether a cyst or tumor is benign or malignant, a sample of the affected tissue — or, in some cases, the entire suspicious area — is removed and studied under a microscope. This is known as a biopsy. A swelling on any of the cutaneous, mucous or serous surface of any part of the body of independent growth.
      •1. Cure for Cyst———–—Mixture of CF 3.x, CP 3x or 12x, CS 3x, NM 3x and S 12x.

      2.Cure for Tumor—-—Mature of CF 12x, CP 3x or 12x, CS 3x, KM 3x, KP 3x, KS 3x, NM 3x, NP 3x and S 12x. For small children’s bloody tumour-CF 3x is useful

      •Dosage*: 2 grains t.d.s.
      •All these biochemic salts/homeo medicines available @ local Homoeo shops, are safe and with side benefits. Don’t swallow medicine. The medicine to be dissolved on/under the tongue. Don’t take any thing 10 minutes before and 10 minutes after medication. You can take water.

      U may try both medicines alternatively. If not curable in 45 days, then
      anyways, U may see a general surgeon/local homeopath/dermatologist for physical examination, relevant investigations, accurate diagnosis and permanent cure by medication and or surgical interference.
      PS. If satisfied/benefited with, inform others to browse ‘Yahoo Answers’ on any health issue.
      Source: ‘HEALTH IN UR HANDS’ [Vol.I & II] available in all Indian Languages all over the globe] by Dr.Devendra Vora, DSc.,MD.,FRCP.,—an octogenarian & the pioneer in Acupressure in India.

  23. QUESTION:
    Does birth control (oral contraceptive) help stabilize your mood?
    I get HORRIBLE pms. I get extremely sad in the week before my period and a lot of times I get suicidal. It’s hard to deal with. My mom doesn’t know about it. I talked to my friend, and she said that birth control helps with pms/mood swings. Is this true?

    • ANSWER:
      Birth control pills provide certain health benefits in addition to preventing pregnancy.

      •Highly effective reversible contraception. Birth control pills provide highly reliable contraceptive protection, exceeding 99%. Even when imperfect use (skipping an occasional pill) is considered, the BCPs are still very effective in preventing pregnancy.
      •Menstrual cycle regulation. Birth control pills cause menstrual cycles to occur regularly and predictably. This is especially helpful for women with periods that come too often or too infrequently. Periods also tend to be lighter and shorter.
      •Decrease risk of iron deficiency (anemia). Birth control pills reduce the amount of blood flow during the period. Less blood loss is helpful in preventing anemia.
      •Reduce the risk of ovarian cysts. The risk of developing ovarian cysts is greatly reduced for birth control pills users because they help prevent ovulation. An ovarian cyst is a fluid – filled growth that can develop in the ovary during ovulation.
      •Protection against pelvic inflammatory disease. Birth control pills provide some protection against pelvic inflammatory disease (PID). Pelvic inflammatory disease is a serious bacterial infection of the fallopian tubes and uterus that can result in severe pain and potentially, infertility.
      •Can improve acne. For moderate to severe acne, which over-the-counter and prescription medications can’t cure, birth control pills may be prescribed. The hormones in the birth control pill can help stop acne from forming.
      •Reduce the risk of symptomatic endometriosis. Women who have endometriosis tend to have less pelvic pain and fewer other symptoms when they are on the Pill. Birth control pills won’t cure endometriosis but it may stop the disease from progressing. Birth control pills are the first-choice treatment for controlling endometriosis growth and pain. This is because birth control hormones are the hormone therapy that is least likely to cause bad side effects.
      •Improve fibrocystic breasts. 70 – 90% of patients see improvement in the symptoms of fibrocystic breast conditions with use of oral contraceptives.
      •Improved excess hair (hirsutism). Women with excessive facial or body hair may notice an improvement while taking the Pill, because androgens and testosterone are suppressed by oral contraceptives. High androgen levels can cause darkening of facial and body hair, especially on the chin, chest, and abdomen.
      •Prevent ectopic pregnancy. Because birth control pills work primarily by suppressing ovulation, they effectively prevent ectopic pregnancy as well as normal pregnancy. This makes the pills an excellent contraceptive choice for women who are at particular risk for ectopic pregnancy, a potentially life-threatening condition.
      •Help prevent osteoporosis. Studies show that by regulating hormones, the pill can help prevent osteoporosis, a gradual weakening of the bones.
      •Do not affect future fertility. Using pills will not affect a womanТs future fertility, although it may take two to three months longer to get pregnant than if a woman did not take pills.
      •Safe for many women. Research for over 40 years has proven long term safety.

      Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/372251
      Source(s):

      http://ezinearticles.com/?Birth-Control-…

  24. QUESTION:
    should i be worried about a lymph node the size of a pea in groin area?
    should i be worried? also i’m just starting to get a cold would that be the cause of it? thankyou

    • ANSWER:
      First of all, please, don’t be panicky. Study it carefully and discuss with Ur family members/friends and implement it for a month. By His grace, let us wish, U shall be fine in a few weeks.

      Any lump*/lymph node enlargement*, in any part of the body on the skin, is a sign of blocked energy + toxins in the lymphatic system. It may be a cyst, tumor [benign/malignant]. If possible identify it properly or U may use both medicines alternatively mentioned hereunder, for the best possible cure in 45 days.

      Everyone MUST be aware of——–Any Cancer, lupus, HIV/AIDS, Kaposi’s Sarcoma, etc., —Common Symptoms:
      Sudden loss of weight/stamina, anemia, unbearable pains in any organ despite medication, neuralgia, severe hair loss [with excessive accumulated heat in the body], FATIGUE-getting extremely tired for a little or no work, loss of appetite, unhealed wound in any part of the body for years together, chronic constipation, chronic hemorrhages, etc. Cancer may affect from any organ to any organ[s]/system[s].

      1. Cyst*— Cyst. A cyst is a sac that may be filled with air, fluid or other material. A cyst can form in any part of the body, including bones, organs and soft tissues. Most cysts are non-cancerous (benign). Some common examples of cysts include sebaceous cysts, small bumps that form just beneath the skin, and ovarian cysts. It’s important to note, however, that nearly all cancers are capable of producing cysts. (A sac containing liquid secretion or pus).
      •2. Tumor*— Tumor. A tumor is an abnormal mass of tissue. Like a cyst, a tumor can form in any part of the body. A tumor can be benign or cancerous (malignant).
      To determine whether a cyst or tumor is benign or malignant, a sample of the affected tissue — or, in some cases, the entire suspicious area — is removed and studied under a microscope. This is known as a biopsy. A swelling on any of the cutaneous, mucous or serous surface of any part of the body of independent growth.
      •1. Cure for Cyst———–—Mixture of CF 3.x, CP 3x or 12x, CS 3x, NM 3x and S 12x.

      2.Cure for Tumor—-—Mature of CF 12x, CP 3x or 12x, CS 3x, KM 3x, KP 3x, KS 3x, NM 3x, NP 3x and S 12x. For small children’s bloody tumour-CF 3x is useful

      •Dosage*: 2 grains t.d.s.
      •All these biochemic salts/homeo medicines available @ local Homoeo shops, are safe and with side benefits. Don’t swallow medicine. The medicine to be dissolved on/under the tongue. Don’t take any thing 10 minutes before and 10 minutes after medication. You can take water.

      U may try both medicines alternatively. If not curable in 45 days, then
      anyways, U may see a general surgeon/local homeopath/dermatologist for physical examination, relevant investigations, accurate diagnosis and permanent cure by medication and or surgical interference.

      PS. If satisfied/benefited with, inform others to browse ‘Yahoo Answers’ on any health issue.

      Source: ‘HEALTH IN UR HANDS’ [Vol.I & II] available in all Indian Languages all over the globe] by Dr.Devendra Vora, DSc.,MD.,FRCP.,—an octogenarian & the pioneer in Acupressure in India.

  25. QUESTION:
    Doctors & nurses – if a patient came to you with these symptoms, what would you think?
    TMJ, depression, low *normal* body temp, chest pains, breathing issues, daily headaches – frequent migraines and tension headaches, sensitivity to light and sound, cough, diarrhea for 3 months, thyroid disease, endometriosis, PCOS, ovarian cysts, hair loss, weight gain – mostly in midsection, food sensitivity, nausea, sleeping problems, IBS, constant gas, intolerance to multivitamins, excessive sweating, burning sensation in arms, joint pain in ankles knees & hips, muscular pain in upper legs and forearms.

    I just found a family doctor and made an appointment – I’m guessing I’ll need a referral to a specialist, my endocrinologist thought I’d need to see a rheumatologist since my vitamin d levels are okay, so are my thyroid levels & my lupus test was negative. I’ve gotten the vibe from a lot of people that this may be fibromyalgia. Any other ideas? Also, what kind of treatment options are there? Any doctors out there who don’t think it’s all in your head?
    I’m not looking for some moron to tell me there’s nothing wrong with me. You have no medical background and probably haven’t even graduated from high school, so I’m not looking for YOUR advice. If you aren’t smart enough to figure out that the first few words in my question are “doctors & nurses” and that means I want answers from someone with a clue – than you’re an idiot. Go waste your time on someone else’s question.

    • ANSWER:
      I am not a dr. but yes it does sound like fibromyalgia. But, since you have trouble sleeping, and the shits all the time and can’t take a multi vitamin, I really think you need to see a nutritonist. You can get really sick from not sleeping and having the shits. It depletes the vitamins in your body, causes your cells to damage easier, your anit-bodies to attack your self instead of invaders, it can bring your immune system down, there are so many things that can go wrong if you can’t sleep and have upset stomatch all the time. All of your body works together too if one thing isn’t right everything else gets throw off too it like a domino effect. If your body isn’t working efficiantly your just going to get worse and worse. A nutritionist will work with you to get your body on a path to getting stronger, you can take the drug nessicary to feel better but if you body isn’t working the way it should due to bad nutriton (or depletion of nutrients) or sleep deprivation its going to be that much harder to get to feeling better or even get better period. You need to go to the dr. and i really thing you need to get your insides back to working the way it should. It will take awhile, nutrition and vitamins are not like taking a drug that you feel the effect from in 30-40 minutes it will take a few months to finally feel the effects. One supplement or even herb may not work as well as another, kinda likek meds too. Please go to the nutritionist. I live in constant pain from endometriosis and i know how much it sucks to feel like your life is worthless because you can’t do anything fun or fufilling and i don’t think anyone should know a constant state of pain. Get better damnit.


ovarian cyst symptoms hair loss

Ovarian Cyst Symptoms Back Pain

Apple cider vinegar has a lot of uses. Some people use it in cooking, some use it in cleaning and some even use it as a form of medicine or home remedy. For example, some people use apple cider vinegar for BV relief.

BV, or bacterial vaginosis, is not a fun condition. It can cause both the inside and outside of your vagina to become swollen, painful and itchy. It can also cause discharge and unpleasant smells to come from your vagina. Meanwhile, you may also find yourself experiencing cramps, bloating or even bleeding associated with your BV. That can really make you miserable and it can certainly kill your sex life. So, it's a condition that most women are in a hurry to cure.

Killing The Bacteria:

The traditional medical way to cure BV, which is a bacterial infection, is to kill off the offending bacteria. Your doctor might suggest that you do that by taking antibiotics. However, antibiotics will kill all bacteria and the thing that many women don't understand is that a woman's vagina is supposed to contain healthy bacteria, which protect it.

Altering The Balance:

The reason that apple cider vinegar works so well as a treatment for BV is that it is slightly acidic. Therefore, it has the power to alter the pH balance of your vagina just enough to allow good bacteria to stay healthy and keep bad bacteria from growing. So, you can slightly adjust your vaginal environment, rather than obliterating all of the bacteria with antibiotics.

A Vinegar Bath:

If you're going to use apple cider vinegar to relieve BV symptoms, one easy way to do that is to take an apple cider vinegar bath. Start by running a warm, shallow bath. Then, mix in about half to a whole cup of the vinegar with the bath water. Be careful not to add too much vinegar because that could cause a severe burning sensation when you sit down in the tub.

An apple cider vinegar bath can be useful, but you shouldn't do it too often. Remember that you just want to restore the balance in your vagina. Tipping the scales too far in the other direction might just make your problems worse.

A Vinegar Douche:

Like a vinegar bath, a vinegar douche should be quite diluted. A teaspoon of apple cider vinegar in two cups of water should be fine. Also, as with a vinegar bath, you shouldn't douche too often. Once a day is quite enough to get the job done.

Drinking Vinegar:

Drinking a little apple cider vinegar is a good way to prevent BV, although it may not be as helpful as a bath or douche in terms of curing an existing BV outbreak. However, using apple cider vinegar for BV relief, especially if you plan to drink it, should be done with care. Since it is slightly acidic, you don't need or want large quantities of it in your body. So, use it in moderation and you should find that it can bring you some much needed BV relief.

About the author:

Source: http://www.sooperarticles.com/health-fitness-articles/vaginal-pain-articles/apple-cider-vinegar-bv-treatment-method-uses-633261.html

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    What is the main ovarian cyst symptoms?
    Is it true that ovarian cyst symptoms are the same as pregnancy symptoms.
    I’ve read some answers here saying that but I don’t think that’s true.

    • ANSWER:
      The number of women suffering from ovarian cyst has caused concern for other women everywhere. The alarming growth of incidents may indicate that no one is immune to this dreaded reproductive problem. In recent years, millions of women from all walks of life have experienced having ovarian cyst, and chances are you too might have one as well. So it is vital that you learn the ovarian cyst symptoms to detect the disease as quickly as possible.

      First you have to remember that ovarian cyst symptoms are different depending on its type. An ovarian cyst could either be one of the following: functional cyst, polycystic ovaries, endometrial cysts, cytadenomas and dermoid cysts. The symptoms of each of these types are different because their growth is not the same.

      It is hard to tell the cysts on ovaries symptoms in its early development, which is definitely a bad news to all the women. They might just mistake the symptoms as part of their menstrual period. But if the pain gets really excruciating, then it is definitely not the ordinary menstrual cramp, it could be ovarian cyst already.

      Recurring back aches could also be signs of having ovarian cyst. If your back is constantly aching, you should see your doctor quick for an examination. Lower back pain could also be a signal that you have cyst on ovary.

      If you notice tenderness in your breasts, it may also be one of the ovarian cyst symptoms. See your doctor at once if you notice clearly the obvious change in your breasts. Irregular menstrual period is also one of the symptoms of having this type of reproductive disease.

      If you feel like you always want to vomit, then you might be suffering from this disease as well. Women who are still in their reproductive years may simply mistake it as being a sign of pregnancy. But they might already be suffering from ovarian cyst if the feeling of vomiting is frequent.

      Pain during sex may also indicate that you have ovarian cyst. In case it would be your first time to experience pain during your intimate moments with hubby, then it should be a cause for concern. The growing cyst in your ovary is causing the pain.

      Problem in bowel movement is another symptom of having ovarian cyst. Women should not ignore if they have frequent constipation as it may be one of the ovarian cyst symptoms. You might also be developing cyst on ovary if you feel a constant abdominal pain accompanied by pressure.

      Visit your doctor at once for ovarian cyst treatment if you are suffering from any of the symptoms mentioned above. Although most of the symptoms are also connected with other reproductive problems, it is better to be safe than sorry.

  2. QUESTION:
    What are the natural ovarian cyst cures?
    I am showing ovarian cyst symptoms. What are the natural ovarian cyst cures? Thank you!

    • ANSWER:
      There was an article on Yahoo health not that long ago talking about the natural cure here http://dwarfurl.com/bce72e

      Hope this helps. It worked wonders for me. Its so good being pain free.

  3. QUESTION:
    how often/long does pain from ovarian cysts last?
    every few months i get intensely bad abdominal pain and symptoms that are similar to ovarian cyst symptoms ive researched. i was just wondering how long pain from cysts lasts? mine lasts only a day or two. and also how frequently someone with ovarian cysts would get pain?
    thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Ovarian cysts come and go on their own. It is important to see a DR if they last longer than one month. If you are less than that then you are just fine and normal. They can come and go rather frequently. Take some aspirin when they bother you. The pain only lasts for as long as they are still around. Once they go away, pain gone.

  4. QUESTION:
    What happens after an ovarian cyst ruptures?
    I was diagnosed with a ruptured ovarian cyst 3 months ago. The symptoms prior to the rupture were pains in my lower right abdomen first in the middle of my cycle then at random times. One day I had really bad pains and an ultrasound revealed a ruptured cyst on my right ovary. My doctor prescribed some painkillers for the pain.

    Since then the pain continues at mid cycle and a few days before my period. It seems to be increasing in intensity and duration, Is this normal?

    • ANSWER:
      You could have another one. I had one removed a few months ago and it is back now and continues to grow.

  5. QUESTION:
    Are Ovarian Cyst Symptomes Constant or do they come and go?
    I think I have another ovarian cyst but my symptoms come and go. Like dull pain on left side, feeling full/bloated, tender breast & discomfort with sex.
    I have no insurance so I am torn to wait and see or go to the E.R.

    • ANSWER:
      they can come and go but most of the time it is a constant pain

  6. QUESTION:
    What are some symptoms of an ovarian cyst?
    I think I might have an ovarian cyst. I had sharp pains in my side around my ovulation time, and i feel nauseous sometimes. I also have small pains when I eat. Has anyone had those symptoms with an ovarian cyst?

    • ANSWER:
      Ovulation can naturally cause women pain. Ovarian cysts can be very, very small, or they can grow to be very large. Do you ever have any pain at any other time? Ovarian cysts often cause extreme pain all the time. My friend had horrible pain all the time, but since she couldn’t afford the doctors bills, she let it go. It finally got so bad that she was rushed to the ER. They did surgery and realized that it had grown to be the size of an orange. Most women experience weight gain, fatigue nausea, and abnormal bleeding. You should go to the doctor, and they will probably watch it for a couple months to see if it is growing. If it is something other than a cyst, it is still wise to see a gyno and have it checked out.

  7. QUESTION:
    What are the symptoms of an ovarian cyst?
    My wife is concerned that she may have an ovarian cyst and would like the symptoms described to her so she can be ready for her dr.’s visit.

    • ANSWER:
      That’s an interesting question because my girlfriend’s daughter went to the hospital yesterday complaining of “kidney pain”. She described these as “sharp stabbing pains ” in the sides and kidneys. She went to the Emergency Room and after a CT scan they diagnosed her with an ovarian cyst (they also wanted to rule out appendicitis).

      As a physician, I have seen many young girls with abdominal and back pain who after I ruled out kidney infections with a normal urine test also ended up with ovarian cysts on ultrasound.

      In addtion, I’m seen a few girls who had screening ultrasounds and ovarian cysts were found “incidently”.

      So in inconclusion- large cysts will usually cause back or side pain. Small cysts may be asymptomatic. The best plan would be for your wife to describe to the Dr. what her symptoms exactly are and have him/her order an ultrasound/CT scan with some urine tests to help diagnosis her.

      Good luck

      below is a web site describing cysts

      http://familydoctor.org/279.xml

  8. QUESTION:
    What would cause an ovarian cyst in a 13 year old?
    When i was 13 (im 15 now) i got an ovarian cyst on my left ovary. It was pretty big and it got twisted around 3 times. I never had any symptoms except for one morning i got up before school and i just had a really sharp pain. I had surgery the next morning to remove it. I read up about it because i wasnt really sure what it was and i read that it usually occurs in woman during their child bearing years. What would be the cause of me getting it?

    • ANSWER:
      An ovarian cyst is any collection of fluid, surrounded by a very thin wall, within an ovary. Any ovarian follicle that is larger than about two centimeters is termed an ovarian cyst. An ovarian cyst can be as small as a pea, or larger than a cantaloupe.

      Most ovarian cysts are functional in nature, and harmless (benign). In the US, ovarian cysts are found in nearly all premenopausal women, and in up to 14.8% of postmenopausal women. The incidence of ovarian carcinoma is approximately 15 cases per 100,000 women per year.

      Ovarian cysts affect women of all ages. They occur most often, however, during a woman’s childbearing years.

      Some ovarian cysts cause problems, such as bleeding and pain. Surgery may be required to remove those cysts.”

  9. QUESTION:
    What does it feel like to have an ovarian cyst/other similar problem?
    I woke up yesterday with terrible burning pain all around the area where I would usually have menstrual cramps. After vomiting a few times, I felt relief but still felt some pain in the cramping area. Today, I still the pain in the same area. At first I thought it may be appendicitis, however the pain is not as bad and I am not running a fever or other classic symptoms. I am right around ovulation time right now, could this be an ovarian cyst problem or something else related to ovaries?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes it could be, I think you should see the doctor, it sounds like a cyst, and I hope the cyst did not break!! Good Luck!

  10. QUESTION:
    Do ovarian cysts usually need to be surgically removed?
    I was told today after getting MRI results that I need to see an oncologist. I always thought that most ovarian cysts and fibroids are not cancer. I have no symptoms, no pain, no bleeding.
    Do you think I’ll have to have that godd-awful test called a ‘Hysterosonography?’
    the report mentioned that I should go for a transvaginal sonogram for more information.

    • ANSWER:
      Typically, ovarian cysts are functional (not disease or cancer related) and occur as a normal process of ovulation. During the days before ovulation, a follicle grows. But at the time of expected ovulation, the follicle fails to break open and release an egg, as it is supposed to. Instead, the fluid within the follicle remains and forms a cyst.

      Functional, or physiological, ovarian cysts usually disappear within 8-12 weeks without treatment. They are relatively common, and are more common during a woman’s childbearing years (puberty to menopause). Ovarian cysts are rare after menopause.

      Functional ovarian cysts are not the same as ovarian tumors (including ovarian cancer) or cysts due to hormone-related conditions such as polycystic ovarian disease. Some non-functional ovarian cysts must be treated to go away.

      An ovarian cyst can cause pain if it pushes on nearby structures, ruptures or bleeds. Pain may also occur if the cyst is twisted or causes twisting (torsion) of the fallopian tube.

      Symptoms of ovarian cysts can include:

      * Pelvic pain – constant, dull aching
      * Pain with intercourse or pelvic pain during movement
      * Pain during bowel movements
      * Pelvic pain shortly after beginning or ending a menstrual period
      * Abnormal uterine bleeding (change from normal menstrual pattern)
      * Longer than usual menstrual cycle
      * Shorter than usual menstrual cycle
      * Absent menstruation
      * Irregular menstruation
      * Abdominal bloating or swelling

      Often no symptoms are noted and ovarian cysts are found only be routine examinations. Usually birth control pills may be prescribed to help establish normal cycles and decrease the development of functional ovarian cysts.

      Simple ovarian cysts that are larger than 5-10 centimetres and complex ovarian cysts that persist should and will usually be surgically removed via laparoscopy (minimal invasive surgery).

      I would recommend that you discuss all the details such as the type of cyst, size of cyst etc with your doctor/gyno and ask them to answer any questions or concerns you may have.

      I have suffered from many bilateral ovarian cysts over the past 10 years and have had to have surgery 2 times to the cysts removed (it wasn’t anything too serious).

      I hope this helps to answer your question. Good luck :)

  11. QUESTION:
    what are the symptoms of an ovarian cyst?
    for the past couple of weeks, ive been feeling nauseous and by my lower abdomen area it feels like gas pressure and dull pain. it doesnt hurt severely but its uncomfortable. is this an ovarian cyst? can you give me more symptoms for it too?

    • ANSWER:
      There’s no obvious symptoms.
      I have a couple in each ovary, and i only feel discomfort during ovulation, and sometimes during sex.

      They found my cysts when i went for an ultrasound when i was getting really bad stomach aches.
      Maybe you should scheduel for an ultrasound.

      Good luck !

  12. QUESTION:
    What would cause an ovarian cyst in a 13 year old?
    When i was 13 (im 15 now) i got an ovarian cyst on my left ovary. It was pretty big and it got twisted around 3 times. I never had any symptoms except for one morning i got up before school and i just had a really sharp pain. I had surgery the next morning to remove it. I read up about it because i wasnt really sure what it was and i read that it usually occurs in woman during their child bearing years. What would be the cause of me getting it?

    • ANSWER:
      It happened because you are in your childbearing years, which just means the years when your ovaries are working. It can happen for no particular reason other than that. See, every month, as your ovaries work, they produce a cyst. It’s normal. That cyst releases hormones and then is supposed to shrink and go away. But sometimes it doesn’t. It stays around and fills with fluid, kind of like a pimple on your face. And then it grows and grows. As it gets bigger it gets heavier, which can cause your ovary to spin a bit so that the heaviest part–the cyst–is at the bottom, which can cause it to get twisted. Your body makes a lot of hormones during puberty, and those hormones stimulate your ovaries to have lots of activity. This stimulation can sometimes cause cysts. A way to prevent this, if you are prone to cysts, is to use birth control pills, which cause your ovarian activity to reduce.

  13. QUESTION:
    How long does a burst ovarian cyst cause pain?
    How long can a woman typically expect her pain to last when an ovarian cyst bursts?

    • ANSWER:
      Depends on the size of the cyst that ruptured. Mine lasted a few days. Never had any symptoms when I urinated as the fluid just kind of left. I did go to ER in pain but it had been a few hours since it had ruptured and there was only a little fluid left. Take some Ibuprofen or something for the pain.

  14. QUESTION:
    Has anyone suffered from a ruptured ovarian cyst?
    Has anyone suffered from a ruptured ovarian cyst? How long afterwards did your pain/symptoms last?

    • ANSWER:
      Yup. As for how long, well a lot of that will depend on you and your pain tolerance. It will build up pressure, so that can be a few days and than some will feel relief when it burst, others will feel additional pain while it heals.

      Been there, done that lots of times!!!!! Hurts, hopefully yours will stop hurting really soon.

  15. QUESTION:
    What are the symptoms of ovarian cancer vs. ovarian cysts?
    I had an ovarian cyst about two years ago. My sister has PCOS and there’s a good chance that I have it as well. I’m more concerned that I have a possible tumor though. I looked up the symptoms for ovarian cancer and I have almost all of them except for maybe one or two. I’m really scared. I’m only 17 and I have no idea how to approach my parents about it. If I do have something wrong with me though, I don’t want to wait until it’s too late to try and get help. I also have symptoms that could possibly just be another cyst, although I did just get my period so I don’t think that it could be a cyst. It could even be uterine prolapse, but those symptoms aren’t the same as the gassy, abdominal pain and back pain I usually have particulary the week before and the week after my period. I also have a lot of underarm perspiration. Could this be another sign? Mostly I’m just scared that it might be to late and though I’m a strong Christian and I understand that there is a reason for everything.

    • ANSWER:
      It is usually not best to diagnose yourself without about 10 years of medical education and specialization – and even then it isn’t a good idea. Make an appointment with your ob/gyn or family practitioner if you are worried about it.

  16. QUESTION:
    What are the symptoms of ovarian cysts?
    I have never had ovarian cysts, and I don’t have medical insurance to go get it checked out if there is no reason to worry. I had a UTI recently and don’t know if maybe it is connected. I have a sharp pain that comes and goes in the left side of my lower abdomen. A friend told me it is ovarian cysts, so I am wondering, those of you who have had them, what symptoms did you experience?

    • ANSWER:

      http://www.ovarian-cysts.com/articles/ovarian-cyst-symptoms/index.php

      Check out this site. It has a good list of symptoms. However, abdominal pain can come from a large variety of things, so it might not be cysts. A doctor also should be able to detect cysts or irregularities with a pap smear during your annual feminine exam. If you had one recently that was regular then you are probably OK. You should definitely get one every year though, even if you have to go to a free clinic or something. The NBCCEDP does free ones in some places and Planned Parenthood also offers them for a low cost. I go even though I don’t like to. Our church secretary Vicki, the sweetest and best person you would ever know, died last year at only 52 years old from cervical cancer that had gone undetected. Anyway, just to be sure I would have it checked.

      http://www.cdc.gov/cancer/nbccedp/

  17. QUESTION:
    What can I expect when my ovarian cyst ruptures?
    I went to the doctors on the 5th because i was having bad pelvic pain. I found out that i have an ovarian cyst. I was wondering if anyone can tell me what symptoms i can expect to feel when the cyst ruptures?

    • ANSWER:
      Well, it is pretty obvious that “Captain Obvious” has never had an ovarian cyst burst, because if she had, she would have told you it hurts more than you can possibly imagine. I’ve had two rupture, and dang!, it’s crippling. Seriously. My doctor told me that most women end up in the emergency room because the pain is so intense. Oh, yeah, it’s possible that the cyst will not burst, but if it’s hurting now, and with every cycle the pain gets worse, then prepare yourself…it’s gonna pop, and you are gonna hurt. Afterwards, you’ll have some fullness in your abdomen, water, slushy feeling. And if you are really lucky, it won’t happen again.

  18. QUESTION:
    What happens when an ovarian cyst ruptures?
    When an ovarian cyst ruptures, can it cause more harm to your eggs? Will it decrease chances of pregnancy even more?

    • ANSWER:
      Ruptured ovarian cysts, as any woman who has had one will tell you, can be incredibly painful. Many women have ovarian cysts without even knowing it, and often they just disappear themselves. But sometimes they continue to grow, and if left untreated, the walls of the cyst will get thinner, and eventually it may burst, or rupture.

      It is unusual for the pain experienced from a ruptured ovarian cyst to be the first symptom a woman feels. Because the cyst is typically quite large before it ruptures, it usually causes a good deal of discomfort and pain.

      Typical symptoms include:

      - abdominal pain, particularly during the menstrual period
      - irregular menstrual cycles
      - feeling the need to urinate frequently (as the large cyst puts pressure on the bladder)
      - sometimes difficulty urinating
      - feeling of pressure or heaviness in the stomach

      The symptoms of a ruptured ovarian cyst are very similar, but usually the pain is much more intense. It also usually comes very suddenly – a cyst rupturing is like a water balloon bursting, so the pain is sharp and sudden. Thankfully, the severe pain is usually quite short lived (typically ebbing within 24 hours), and the pressure is relieved from the ‘balloon’ on your ovary.

      Mostly, after the rupture the ovary will heal itself, and there will be no further complications. But this is not always the case. The ovary can get infected, which if left untreated can have serious implications for your health and your ability to conceive.

      Sometimes, the rupture can cause the ovary to twist, restricting blood flow and causing severe pain. The wound may be slow to heal, so increasing the chance of scar tissue forming. Again, this can affect fertility.

      If you think your cyst might have ruptured, you should get medical attention right away. At the very least, you will probably need strong painkillers. If the intense pain does not subside after 24 hours, it is likely that the ovary has twisted or infection has set in. In this case, it is absolutely essential to get expert medical help.

      Once the cyst has ruptured, it is gone. If you only had one cyst, the problems it caused prior to the rupture should end. However, it is unfortunately quite likely that the cyst will come back again. Unless you do something to change them, the underlying problems which caused the cyst are still present.

      The natural holistic approach to treating and preventing ovarian cysts addresses these underlying causes. By getting your internal balance right, particularly through altering your diet and metabolism, you can get rid of your ovarian cysts for good – without drugs or surgery.
      Good luck

  19. QUESTION:
    How can i tell if my ovarian cyst is twisted?
    I have an ovarian cyst and my doctor said it should go away on its own. He also said that I need to make sure it doesn’t get twisted though. What are the symptoms of a twisted cyst?

    • ANSWER:
      I had that. Symptom is INCREDIBLE PAIN!!! Trust me, you’ll know. If you feel severe cramping, then it’s twisted and you need to go to the emergency room immediately.

  20. QUESTION:
    Is a pulling type of abdominal pain a symptom of a ruptured ovarian cyst?
    I went to the er on tuesday thinking that I had a kidney stone. They did a CAT scan and determined that I ruptured an ovarian cyst. I have been having a type of pulling feeling on the side of the cyst along with nausea and a persistent achey feeling (kind of like when you get a cold or the flu). Is this normal? Thank you.

    • ANSWER:
      well since the cyst already burst you shouldn’t be feeling any severe pain anymore. I had three cysts burst in a 12 hour time frame and once they were done I felt so much better, just a little tired. your body just might be trying to repair itself now and your ovary might be a little inflamed or irritated from the rupture. usually nausea and that achey feeling just come with the cyst rupturing, they should go away soon. drink a lot of water and rest a lot and you should feel better in a few days.

  21. QUESTION:
    Can a 9 year old girl have an ovarian cyst?
    I didn’t know it was possible until my daughter started having abdominal pain and other symptoms that suggest an ovarian cyst. I took her to a pediatrician , who said it “could be” a cyst, and recommends a pelvic ultrasound.

    • ANSWER:
      I thought you’d have to have you’re period for that? Maybe not. I hope it not. Good luck. :[

  22. QUESTION:
    Are these signs of enlarged ovarian cyst and how to help it?
    I suffered from ovarian cysts in the past. I had one burst (I ended up in emergency room with severe abdominal pain a sweating) and the other burst during my second pregnancy (I ended up in ER thinking I am miscarrying). all the other times I had them come and go not noticing (random ultrasounds showed them, otherwise I wouldn’t know). 5 years after my last burst I am experiencing weird symptoms, which led me think I have UTI. But now I realized it might be another cyst – either enlarged or burst).
    Symptoms are: Abdominal cramping (like menstrual but a bit stronger), bloated (feels like swollen) belly, constant urge to go to the bathroom, slight diarrhea. I don’t feel like eating, and warm blanket or bath helps me cope. I took Ibuprofen for the pain but that helped for a short time.
    I know you will tell me to go to doctor and I am planning on it for Monday, because they are out of the office till then. If you think this sounds like ovarian cyst that is enlarged how can I help it to go down? And how can I tell it burst? It seems like I don’t remember how I felt the other 2 times this happened. Also I just had my yearly check up and test and the results came normal. I would appreciate any input, thank you.

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, these are signs of enlarged ovarian cyst. It can be treated surgically…

  23. QUESTION:
    Whats the difference between an ovarian cyst and ovarian cancer?
    My sister has an ‘ovarian cyst’ 15 cm i n width….. The average cyst rarely exceeds 5 cm…… can a cyst turn into cancer?

    • ANSWER:
      Ovarian cyst is:

      An ovarian cyst is a fluid-filled sac in the ovary. Many cysts are completely normal. These are called functional cysts. They occur as a result of ovulation (the release of an egg from the ovary). Functional cysts normally shrink over time, usually in about 1 to 3 months. If you have a functional cyst, your doctor may want to check you again in 1 to 3 months to make sure the cyst has gotten smaller. In certain cases, your doctor may want you to take birth control pills so you won’t ovulate. If you don’t ovulate, you won’t form cysts.

      If you are menopausal and are not having periods, you shouldn’t form functional cysts. If you do have a cyst, your doctor will probably want you to have a sonogram so he or she can look at the cyst. What your doctor decides to do after that depends on your age, the way the cyst looks on the sonogram and if you’re having symptoms such as pain, bloating, feeling full after eating just a little, and constipation.

      Ovarian Cancer:

      Recognizing ovarian cancer symptoms

      Ovarian cancer often shows no obvious signs or symptoms until late in its development. Signs and symptoms of ovarian cancer may include:

      General abdominal discomfort and/or pain (gas, indigestion, pressure, swelling, bloating, cramps)

      Nausea, diarrhea, constipation, or frequent urination

      Loss of appetite

      Feeling of fullness even after a light meal

      Weight gain or loss with no known reason

      Abnormal bleeding from the vagina

      These symptoms may be caused by ovarian cancer or by other, less serious conditions. It is important to check with a doctor about any of these symptoms.

      To help find the cause of symptoms, a doctor evaluates a woman’s medical history. The doctor also performs a physical exam and orders diagnostic tests. Some exams and tests that may be useful are described below:

      Pelvic exam includes feeling the uterus, vagina, ovaries, fallopian tubes, bladder, and rectum to find any abnormality in their shape or size. (A Pap test, a good test for cancer of the cervix, is often done along with the pelvic exam, but it is not a reliable way to find or diagnose ovarian cancer.)

      Ultrasound refers to the use of high-frequency sound waves. These waves, which cannot be heard by humans, are aimed at the ovaries. The pattern of the echoes they produce creates a picture called a sonogram.

      CA-125 assay is a blood test used to measure the level of CA-125, a tumor marker that is often found in higher-than-normal amounts in the blood of women with ovarian cancer.

      Lower GI series, or barium enema, is a series of x-rays of the colon and rectum. The pictures are taken after the patient is given an enema with a white, chalky solution containing barium. The barium outlines the colon and rectum on the x-ray, making tumors or other abnormal areas easier to see.

      CT (or CAT) scan is a series of detailed pictures of areas inside the body created by a computer linked to an x-ray machine.

      Biopsy is the removal of tissue for examination under a microscope. A pathologist studies the tissue to make a diagnosis. To obtain the tissue, the surgeon performs a laparotomy (an operation to open the abdomen). If cancer is suspected, the surgeon performs an oophorectomy (removal of the entire ovary). This is important because, if cancer is present, removing just a sample of tissue by cutting through the outer layer of the ovary could allow cancer cells to escape and cause the disease to spread.

      If the diagnosis is ovarian cancer, the doctor will want to learn the stage (or extent) of disease. Staging is a careful attempt to find out whether the cancer has spread and, if so, to what parts of the body. Staging may involve surgery, x-rays and other imaging procedures, and lab tests. Knowing the stage of the disease helps the doctor plan treatment.

  24. QUESTION:
    Can you be on birth control and have an ovarian cyst?
    I’ve been having pain in the lower right side of my abs, beside my pelvic bone. It’s a dull pain with sudden sharp pains. But I’ve been on BC for a year and I heard that BC can treat ovarian cysts. So what could it be? Could it still be a cyst? I am not having any trouble peeing so I don’t think it’s a bladder infection?
    You said that you had a cyst the size of a lemon? Are you able to feel that when pushing down on your side?

    • ANSWER:
      ovarian cyst is still possible regardless of birth control. if the pain is continuous, you should be seen by your doc as soon as possible. cyst can rupture and cause a lot of complications. i had one the size of a lemon. had emergency surgery to have it removed. my only symptom was a constant dull pain in the abdominal left side. see a doc, better safe than sorry!!

  25. QUESTION:
    What does it feel like to have an ovarian cyst?
    I keep getting this mild pain in my lower left abdominal area. It is nothing excruciating and I don’t have it every day. But I don’t know how to describe it. My doctor thinks it might be an ovarian cyst but I’d like to hear what other say it feels like before I take her word for it.

    • ANSWER:
      It’s not very pleasant. =/

      What happened to me was different from what you’re describing, but it’s different from what other people describe too. =p
      I’ll just say what it was like and you can make a judgement from that.-

      I didn’t really notice it before it started hurting really badly, although I suppose I did have some of the symptoms before. I just had this weird dull pain in my right side. Like there was someone twisting my insides in that spot. I just went to bed, and when I woke up the next day, I still had this unpleasant pain in my side. I thought nothing of it, but I didn’t feel like going anywhere so the rest of my family and my cousins that I was staying with at the time, went out for a walk or something without me. Then around midday it started hurting LOADS, I couldn’t concentrate on anything, and nothing would improve it. It was quite horrible actually, because I was all by myself in an unfamiliar house in the middle of nowhere with no phone signal or internet. When my parents came back, they drove me to the local doctors, who said it was ‘definitely’ my appendix. ¬¬

      We drove an hour to get to the hospital while I was in agony, and then had to wait for over 7 hours in the hospital until they even tried to figure out what was wrong with me. After numerous blood samples and random patronizing doctors poking at my stomach, they sent me for an ultrasound. That took flippin’ ages, but eventually they said that there were ‘several small cysts’ and ‘fluid’ and similar disgusting descriptions, and gave me painkillers and sent me home. It stopped hurting while I was in the hospital waiting room though, and hasn’t hurt since, so I dunno.

      Anyway, ask for an ultrasound. You can find out for definite. I’m guessing a cyst ruptured or something and that was the excruciating pain I ended up with, so I hope you don’t have to suffer the same thing. =(


ovarian cyst symptoms back pain

Ovarian Cyst Rupture Discharge

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Can an ovarian cyst cause vaginal itching and discharge?
    I recently discovered that i have an ovarian cyst that ruptured. I have had itching and a little bit of discharge that is either milky or has a slight yellowish tint to it. Could this be caused by the cyst?

    • ANSWER:
      It could be your cyst or it is the same syptoms of a std “bacteria vaginosis. i would go get checked out and have a pap.

  2. QUESTION:
    What are the symptoms of a ruptured ovarian cyst?
    For the past three days, I have been having a dark brown almost black discharge. My period isn’t supposed to start for another week. Is this a symptom of a ruptured ovarian cyst? If not, what is it? I missed my birth control the 1 day before my most fertile day which was the 19th of this month, and my boyfriend and I did have sex on that day. So what is it?
    Also, 4 years ago I had ovarian cysts, I don’t know if I have them again.

    • ANSWER:
      Short and simple, go to the ER , stop reading short novels for answers and have your only body checked out before you die in bed from bleeding out in your sleep.

  3. QUESTION:
    Is this a symptom of an ovarian cyst?
    I had a Huge ovarian cyst rupture last month. Holy cow, was that intense! I’m feeling all the pain again right now. Instead of having a period (which I was due a few days ago), I had clear discharge. I wonder if I should get it checked out. I’ve never had that symptom before. Also, last month and right now I have this severe headache that’s keeping me from being able to do just about anything. The pain’s into my neck and everything. Why would an ovarian cyst cause a headache?

    • ANSWER:
      I had a huge ovarian cyst a couple of months ago as well. The pain is intense- you’re right. :(

      Right before mine I had discharge, too but it may be for different reasons- everyone is different.
      Headaches are pretty much common whenever you have stress, so maybe you are stressed because you are thinking you might be having another cyst.
      Either that, or you could just be having another one. :/
      I didn’t have any headaches, though.

      Hope you end up okay,
      -me(:

  4. QUESTION:
    Is it normal to have streaks of blood in discharge when you have an ovarian cyst?
    i’m 15 yrs old, i recently just went the the hospital due to stomach pains. They found that i have a small ovarian cyst. I went to the bathroom last night and found little streaks of blood in my discharge when i wiped. I had my period two weeks ago, i’m really scared i don’t no what the problem is… please help me!

    • ANSWER:
      I had two I didn’t know about and they ruptured. It was the most horrible pain I have ever felt. The slight bleeding may be a sign of it about to rupture. I’d check with your doctor. I had another one that wouldn’t go away, and had to be removed through surgery. That was no picnic either…

  5. QUESTION:
    Is it normal to have brown discharge with ovarian cyst?
    I recently went to the ER for abdominal pain, I had other GI issues but the cause of my lower abdominal pain was a cyst on my ovary about 2.5cm in size. I have had this pain for about 2 1/2 weeks and for the past 5 days Ive had brown discharge and some tissue passing. The cyst was spotted 1 day ago so it hasnt ruptured but the pain is slowly getting worse. Is this normal? I also do not have periods because I am on depo injections and never have had any spotting.

    • ANSWER:

  6. QUESTION:
    Worth going to the doctor for a ruptured ovarian cyst?
    Yesterday I went to the clinic with intense right side abdominal pain. They sent me to the ER and a CT showed signs of a ruptured ovarian cyst. They gave me IV pain and anti-nausea meds but nothing to take home. They barely said two words to me when I was discharged and weren’t particularly helpful. I was still in a lot of pain today, so I took a Vicodin (which were prescribed for me to take when my migraines get really severe) which helped considerably. My question: is it worth making an appointment with my primary physician (who was closed yesterday)? I’m 17 and I’ve never been to a gynecologist before so I don’t have one, and I know first appointments ares harder to schedule. From what I understand the only thing that can be done is meds to help the pain and birth control as a preventative measure for future cysts. However, I already have Vicodin and was told that birth control is potentially dangerous due to the fact that I have a clotting disorder. Is it even worth making an appointment?

    • ANSWER:
      Make the appointment with your primary as an E/R follow-up visit. S/he would be the one to determine if you need to see a GYN about this right now as well and would probably call around to get an appointment for you. Having worked in doctors’ offices in the past, I can tell you that when your doctor calls another doctor on your behalf for a referral appointment, you will get in to be seen A LOT quicker than if you were to make a new patient appointment on your own.

      Given the history of a clotting disorder, a GYN would be the best doctor to advise on options to control the cysts.

      Good luck & hope you feel better.

  7. QUESTION:
    What causes infection in a ovarian cyst?
    Ive recently had a ovary and tube removed on my left side as i had big cyst which was growing and causing abdominal pain, sometimes very sharp, and up until near surgery was decided, thats when the pain was unbearable. Before surgery, i had suspected tubo ovarian abscess after an ultrasound showed fluid within my pouch of douglas, i had high white cell count and fever and i responded to antibiotics apart from the pain and swollen abdomen. 2 weeks later after discharge when i got the surgery wen ultrasound revealed it was bigger and i wasdoubled up in pain, it was revealed it was a dermoid cyst . I never get a straight answer when i ask, what caused the previous infection, as far as i know the cyst wasnt ruptured or twisted, so what caused theinitial infection?

    • ANSWER:
      When you have something growing inside your that shouldn’t be there, the body reacts in several ways. One way is inflammation. Swelling, white blood cell increase, pain, all can be a response to a dermoid cyst. This cyst is growing body parts inside it that are not yours. Your body wants it gone. Your body did a good job fighting it. Your doctor did a good job removing it. Everything went the way it should. It will take a bit of time for you to feel back to yourself, but you will. Having only one ovary and tube should not effect your fertility.

  8. QUESTION:
    Brown vaginal discharge and lower abdominal pain?
    Hello, I’m a 15 year old girl and have been on birth control for 7 months. I’ve been experiencing lower abdominal pain for the past few days, and today after using the restroom i noticed dark brown discharge when wiping. I am not sexually active, and never have been. I’ve had hemorrhagic ovarian cysts in the past. My next period isn’t until March 5th. Does anyone know what this could be? Thank you for your time!

    • ANSWER:
      Could be your period starting early. I have pcos so i know what that is like. If the pain worsens or you start a fever you may have had a cyst rupture. Hope you feel beter :)

  9. QUESTION:
    How to stop getting ovarian cysts?
    im 16 and have gotten 6 ovarian cysts in the last three years which have all ruptured which is very uncommon for my age. I have tried birth control to stop them from forming and when that didnt work my doctor upped my estrogen levels with nuvaring but I got anoyher one last week. How do I get them to stop from coming back? I dont want to deal with this my whole life

    • ANSWER:
      1. Menses irregularities.
      2. Indiscriminate consumption of steroids in the absence of supervision by a super-specialist, endocrinologist.
      3. Stress & Strain.

      MENSES*
      1. Every young girl/spinster/woman must know the significance of Menses cycles, regularity of maintenance with the aid of acupressure techniques & to maintain ‘the best of woman’s health’ for life. The success depends up on the extent of compliance of all stipulated instructions.
      Menses——- is nothing but the God’s Special gift given to the female. It is one of the routes of excretion of toxins, pus cells, dead cells running to millions produced during Catabolism [part of metabolism on daily basis], bad blood, bacteria, viruses, hormonal discharges, etc.
      So long as a female passes through regular menses right from puberty to menopause, she will be well balanced, pretty with natural and healthy glow, good moods of love and affection, excellent immunity/disease resistance power, excellent growth in height up to 21st birthday, etc.
      Irregular periods/heavy periods may be an offshoot of hormonal imbalance, psychological disturbances, indiscriminate consumption of birth control pills, steroids for other causes like allergy, thyroid problems, asthma/bronchitis, etc.
      By and large, the menses cycle ranges from 3 weeks to 5 weeks as and when it is regular. In certain ladies, it is not regular. It can be regulated just in 5 days. During menses, it is advisable to take maximum rest.
      [a]. Ur [Menses related gonads]-remote control-Acupressure points are located in Ur wrists and ankles on both sides to be activated for regulating Ur menses cycle.
      Remote control Acupressure points given by the God. For Treatment, hard-pressure is to be applied on & around these points with Ur thumb and middle finger.
      To activate Ur gonads—13 [vagina], No.14 [uterus]. No.15 [Testes & Ovaries] All these points are located in both wrists and ankles.
      Palms/Soles:

      http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.2304961665160.2103840.1282822997&type=1&l=0a6bb63dd0

      By virtue of regular menses cycles, girls may grow in height up to 21st birth day with aesthetically designed boobs, the study says
      [b]. Eat dry/raw coconut + jaggery, sweets and Laddu made of dry fruits daily one or two. They ensure good strength to the boobs vis-a-vis big size with aesthetic shapes. Hence, most of the Indian women don’t have the problem of small boobs.
      Detection, prevention & cure for lumps/abscesses in the breast.
      Dorsal side of Palms & soles:
      In the middle of dorsal side of Ur palm, the remote control point for the breast is given, in the maps with links published hereunder. On hard pressing by Ur thumb and middle finger, if it hurts, U may feel that U/she have/has blocked energy + toxins in the breast. If U press the surrounding area on both palms regularly three times a day and then breast cancer shall not grow further and any abscess/boil/infection gets dissolved automatically. Acupressure & Indian Natural Remedies can cure breast cancer safely & totally.

      http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a…

      Cure is available by Acupressure Techniques & Indian Natural Remedies.

      3. Regular menses with the best of Health for life? Yes, Acupressure & Natural Remedies may solve Ur problem of irregular Menses.
      ACUPRESSURE TECHNIQUES:

      Utility—Blocked energy + toxins shall be moved from all Ur internal organs to purge in the normal drainage system, i.e., urine, feces, sweat, cough, menses[ladies], vomiting and all the organs shall function upto optimal levels.

      With Ur thumb, press Ur/his/her palms and soles, wrists and ankles on both sides. Suppose pain is felt while pressing a particular point in the palm/sole, u have to press the surrounding area—just like u r pumping out air from that painful point. The blocked energy in any internal organ, be it lungs, heart, stomach, kidneys, pancreas, liver, etc., shall be released along with toxins if any. As a last point u must press middle part of each palm/sole; so that toxins, if any, shall be excreted through urine without affecting the kidneys.
      It should be done in an empty stomach or 2 hours after meals. With this, all the endocrine glands and their hormonal secretions shall be regulated. All internal organs shall function up to optimal levels. Ur entire immune system gets invigorated to produce antibodies.

      PS. If satisfied/benefited with, inform others to join ‘Yahoo Answers’ on any health problem.
      Source: ‘HEALTH IN UR HANDS’ [Vol.I & II] available in all Indian Languages all over the globe] by Dr.Devendra Vora, DSc.,MD.,FRCP.,—an octogenarian & the pioneer in Acupressure in India.

  10. QUESTION:
    Trying to conceive after miscarriage,baby, and cyst any info on bettering chances?
    In Oct. 2003 I had a miscarriage with my 1st at 3 months pregnant. It took me 1 yr 5 months to conceive again with my now healthy 13 month old. I want another baby and have tried for 8 months without luck. I expereinced an ovarian cyst rupture in Oct. 2006 plus I have 35 day cycles and sometimes 36 day ones what could improve my chances of conceiving? Or what might be the problem? Thanks for the time. Also I track my ovulation and period.

    • ANSWER:
      OK, this may be a little gross, but I swear by it and it worked for my friend who actually told me about it. She said the 2 days you first begin ovulating are your most fertile. So about 14 days after the start of your period, you’ll notice a change in the discharge and it looks very mucusy. That day is the day to try!

      Took me 2 months to get pregnant. And I have irregular cycles.

  11. QUESTION:
    i have pain in my lower right side just above my hip bone. it started 2 days ago and it hurts while just sit?
    i have not been drinking any soda’s, only drinking water, and juice and have been taking vitamins. it is discomfort. i need to know should i go to the doctor. i have been have discharge from time to time. what is your suggestion to me.

    • ANSWER:
      Hello there! I know exactly what you are going through. I have been there. It sounds as if you have an ovarian cyst. These can make it feel as if your insides are bruised. I would have pain and discomfort if I sat, stood, urinated. It is no fun at all. The bright side is that they usually resolve on their own within a week or so. If you should begin to bleed or the pain worsens, you need to seek medical care. In some cases, these cysts if large enough, rupture. There can be quite a bit of bleeding when this happens. Most likely, you will not have any complications and you will feel better very soon. I hope that this has been helpful in some way. Feel better!

  12. QUESTION:
    Vaginal bleeding in between periods that only lasts a few hours?
    Im 25 and usually have semi-normal cycles. Had unprotected sex the day after my period ended. Now I bled for like 3 hours filling 2 tampons and then stopped completely. My period isnt due for another 2 weeks.

    What do you think?

    • ANSWER:
      Brown Spotting Between Periods: Causes

      There are many reasons why a woman may notice dark brown discharge. Ovulation spotting can be one of the reasons for noticing vaginal discharge. During the process of ovulation, a mature egg is released, from the ovary, into the uterus for fertilization. This mature egg bursts forth from the ovarian follicle, which may cause slight bleeding. This bleeding can be noticed as being brownish in color, due to oxidization.

      Pregnancy is another reason for observing a brownish discharge. When the fertilized embryo embeds into the uterine wall, it can cause bleeding due to a rupture in the wall of the uterus. This is otherwise known as implantation bleeding and is experienced by women during the first trimester. So if you haven’t got your periods but notice slight spotting, followed by a mild cramping sensation, then there are chances that you may have conceived.

      Being stressed is also one of the reasons for experiencing brownish vaginal discharge. The hormonal levels in the body may be altered due to extreme stress. Sudden changes in body weight can also result in brown spotting between the menstrual cycle. Women who are on a new exercise regimen, may experience vaginal spotting due to a change in the physical activity. However, there is no need to panic as this is natural and may go away once the body adjusts itself to the new regimen.

      Experiencing brown spotting after period while on birth control can be due to the artificial hormones present in the birth control pills. Oral contraceptives contain certain hormones that mimic the function of estrogen and progesterone. This is one of the reasons why some women experience irregular bleeding cycles between periods and spotting after period. The presence of intrauterine devices (IUD), as a method of contraception, can also make women more susceptible to vaginal spotting on birth control.

      Now coming to the serious causes of brown discharge between periods. The presence of infections or sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) can also be one of the causes of menstrual spotting. If these infections like endometriosis, cervicitis or vaginitis do not receive timely medical treatment, then they can become severe and lead to pelvic inflammatory disease (PID). The presence of cysts or fibroids in the uterus or fallopian tubes is also one of the reasons why some women may have a vaginal discharge. Brown spotting before period or even after that can be a sign of cervical or ovarian cancer. According to doctors, vaginal bleeding between the menstrual cycle can be of serious nature. If pain in the pelvis region is also noticed, then it must be brought to the immediate notice of the physician.

      This was about brown spotting between periods. However, if you notice that the discharge is darker in color or has a foul smell, then consult your gynecologist who may diagnose the exact reason and prescribe appropriate medications to treat this condition.

  13. QUESTION:
    Ive been haveing really bad pains on the left side of my stomach, what can this be?
    It’s been accuring every other day or so, and its painfull. What could it be and how do i prevent it?

    • ANSWER:
      Ovarian Cysts

      Doctor’s PCOS Healthy Diet eBook
      ——————————————————————————–

      An ovarian cyst is a fluid-filled sac usually found on the surface of an ovary. There are many types of ovarian cysts, each with a different underlying cause. Many women will have them at some point during their childbearing years. Most are completely without symptoms. However, some types can cause serious health problems.

      You have two walnut-sized ovaries. These are located on either side of the uterus, nestled under the fringed ends of the fallopian or uterine tubes. These tubes create a pathway for a released egg to reach the center of the uterus. During the menstrual cycle, one ovary will develop and mature an egg. The egg is encased in a sac called a follicle. About day 14 of the menstrual cycle, ovulation occurs and the egg is released from the ovary.

      Are They Dangerous?
      Symptoms
      Types of Ovarian Cysts
      How They Are Diagnosed
      How They Are Treated
      Can They Be Prevented?
      Diet and Ovarian Cysts

      Picture of Ovarian Cyst

      Are Ovarian Cysts Dangerous?
      Most are harmless “functional” or “physiologic” cysts. Between 4% and 10% of women of childbearing age develop a potentially serious metabolic dysfunction, known as polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). Multiple cysts are one hallmark of PCOS. PCOS also includes hormonal disruptions that can result in persistent acne, excessive body hair, thinning scalp hair, infertility, obesity, and increased risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and uterine or breast cancer.

      Ovarian cysts can cause discomfort during intercourse. They may bleed, rupture, or twist the ovary, causing significant pelvic pain. Sudden or severe pelvic pain, especially with vomiting or a fever, should be treated as a medical emergency.

      Some ovarian cysts can become cancerous. These are all rare cancers and are most common in women in their fifties. Cancerous ovaries are usually not painful unless they grow very large before they are discovered. Annual pelvic exams are the best preventative method for detecting gynecologic cancers in the early, most treatable stages.

      Top

      Ovarian Cyst Symptoms
      It’s not easy to know whether you have ovarian cysts. You can have cysts without any symptoms at all, or you may have vague abdominal symptoms that could suggest a number of health problems that are completely unrelated to ovarian cysts.

      Some abdominal conditions with symptoms similar to painful ovarian cysts are: appendicitis, diverticulitis, intestinal inflammation or obstruction, gall bladder disease, kidney stone, or bladder infection. Gynecologic problems with symptoms similar to ovarian cysts are: pelvic inflammatory disease, endometriosis, ectopic or tubal pregnancy, or mittleschmirtz, the pain some women feel at mid-cycle, after normal ovulation.

      In general, one or more of the following symptoms could be related to ovarian cysts:

      Menstrual irregularities.
      Pelvic pain – a dull ache, either constant or intermittent, possibly radiating to the low back or thighs.
      Pelvic pain during intercourse.
      Pelvic pain just before your period begins or just after it ends.
      A fullness or heaviness in your abdomen.
      Feeling of pressure on your bladder or rectum.
      Nausea or breast tenderness similar to when you’re pregnant.
      Continuous, creamy or clear-like-eggwhite vaginal discharge that persists unchanged for a month or more.
      Any of these symptoms are sufficient cause to consult with your health professional.

      If you have sudden, severe or spasmodic pain in your lower abdomen, especially if accompanied by fever, vomiting, or signs of shock (cold, clammy skin, rapid breathing, weakness), go immediately to the emergency room of the nearest hospital.

      Top
      Types of Benign Ovarian Cysts
      1) Functional (physiologic) cysts. The most common type of ovarian cyst is the functional cyst, also called a physiologic cyst. “Physiologic” means the cyst is non-pathogenic. It develops from tissue that changes during the process of ovulation. Your ovaries normally grow cystic structures called follicles each month. Typically, these resolve back to normal ovarian tissue after ovulation. But sometimes there is a glitch and the fluid-filled cyst stays on for a while.

      Functional cysts fall into two categories; follicular cyst, and corpus luteum cyst.

      Follicular cyst. The pituitary gland in your brain sends a message, by increasing luteinizing hormone (LH), to the follicle holding the ripening egg. This is called a “LH surge”. Normally, the egg is released from the follicle and starts down the fallopian tube where it may then become fertilized by a sperm cell. If the LH surge does not occur, the follicle doesn’t rupture or release its egg. Instead, it grows until it becomes a cyst. These cysts seldom cause pain, are usually harmless, and may disappear within two or three menstrual cycles.

      Corpus luteum cyst. When there is a successful LH surge and the egg is released, the follicle responds by becoming a new, temporarily little secretory gland called the corpus luteum. The corpus luteum produces large amounts of progesterone and a little bit of estrogen, to prepare the uterus for conception.
      But occasionally, after the egg is released, the escape hatch seals off prematurely and tissue accumulates inside, causing the corpus luteum to enlarge. This type of cyst will usually disappear after a few weeks. Rarely, a corpus luteum cyst can grow to 3″-4″ in diameter and potentially bleed into itself, or twist your ovary, thus causing pelvic or abdominal pain.

      2) Dermoid cyst. A dermoid cyst is mainly fat but can also contain a mix of different tissues. They are often small and usually don’t cause symptoms. Very rarely, they become large and rupture, causing bleeding into the abdomen, which is a medical emergency.

      3) Endometrioma or “chocolate cyst”. These are cysts that form when endometrial tissue (the type that lines the inside of the uterus) invades an ovary. It is responsive to monthly hormonal changes, which causes the cyst to fill with blood. It’s called a “chocolate cyst” because the blood is a dark, reddish-brown color. Multiple endometriomas are found in the condition called “endometriosis”. Although often asymptomatic, chocolate cysts can be painful, especially during your period or during intercourse.

      4) Cystadenoma. Cystadenomas are cysts that develop from cells on the surface of your ovary. They are usually benign. Occasionally, they can become quite large and thus interfere with abdominal organs and cause pain.

      5) Multiple cysts – the polycystic ovary. Women who don’t ovulate on a regular basis can develop multiple cysts. The ovaries are often enlarged and contain many small cysts clustered under a thickened, outer capsule. There are many factors causing a woman to not ovulate and develop polycystic ovaries. Polycystic ovarian syndrome is a complex condition that involves multiple hormonal and organ system dysfunction. Multiple ovarian cysts are just one facet of this disorder.

      Top

      How Ovarian Cysts are Diagnosed
      Pelvic Exam. An ovarian cyst may be discovered by your doctor during a pelvic exam, while she is palpating your ovaries. If a cyst is suspected, an ultrasound is usually the next step.

      Pelvic Ultrasound. Ultrasound is a painless procedure where sound waves are transmitted through your pelvic area and an image of your ovaries and uterus is shown on a video screen. The image is analyzed to determine the nature of the cyst.

      Laparoscopy. Laparoscopy is a surgical procedure performed when your doctor wants to see the cyst. A thin, lighted telescope, called a laparoscope, is inserted through a small incision into your abdomen. Laparoscopy may be used for treatment as well as diagnosis.

      Top

      How Ovarian Cysts are Usually Treated
      Watchful Waiting. If you have no symptoms and ultrasound shows a small, fluid-filled cyst, your doctor may simply schedule another pelvic exam and ultrasound in six weeks. The concept behind watchful waiting is to not actively treat the cyst until does not go away as your hormones change. An unchanging or growing cystic ovary needs further investigation.

      Birth Control Pills. If you have a functional cyst that is larger in size and causing some symptoms, birth control pills may be prescribed. The purpose of birth control pills is to alter your hormone levels so the cyst will shrink. Birth control pills will reduce the probability of other cysts growing.

      Surgery. Your cyst may be surgically removed if it is large, solid or filled with debris, persistently growing, irregularly shaped, or causing pain or other symptoms. If the cyst is not cancerous, it can be surgically removed without also removing the ovary. This is called a cystectomy. In some cases, the doctor may want to remove the affected ovary, while leaving the other intact in order to maintain your ability to have a normal hormone cycle.

      Top

      Can Ovarian Cysts Be Prevented?
      It may not be possible to completely eliminate ovarian cysts. However, you can minimize the probability that they will form and grow.

      You can do this in several fundamental ways:

      Improve the quality of your diet.
      Increase your exercise.
      Control chronic stress.
      Use bio-identical hormones, supplements and herbs to help balance your hormonal system.
      Improve your overall health.

      Top

      Diet and Ovarian Cysts
      A recent study from the Institute of Research Pharmacology in Italy analyzed the diet over a ten-year span of 225 women with benign ovarian cysts and 450 women who did not have ovarian cysts.

      The researchers discovered that the type of food eaten influenced the development of cysts. For example, they said that women who consumed the most beef and cheese developed the most ovarian cysts. In contrast, consumption of green vegetables provided a strong protective effect. This study makes it clear that what you eat will influence whether or not you develop ovarian cysts.

      We have written an in-depth diet ebook for women with PCOS. But the dietary recommendations in the ebook are the same for ovarian cysts. If you have this problem, consider purchasing The Natural Diet Solution to PCOS and Infertility ebook.

      Source: Chiaffarino F et al, Diet and risk of seromucinous benign ovarian cysts, Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol. 2003 Oct 10;110(2):196-200.

  14. QUESTION:
    Can you distinguish if a ovarian cyst dissolves?
    I have on and i am waiting on another ultrasound to see if it will dissolve.
    I have had brownish discharge spotting and was wondering if that was a sign of dissolving.
    I still have bloating, breast tenderness, peeing ALL the time, etc.

    But i was wondering how i would now if it passed at all.
    Anyone have this experience and know if the brown spotting means it has dissolved? or is it bleeding out? or ruptured?

    please no “go to the doctor” answers :)

    • ANSWER:
      Ovarian cysts are not “passed” vaginally. Anatomically impossible, sorry.

  15. QUESTION:
    what is the brown stuff coming out of my vagina?
    its possible that i’m pregnant. Im not suppose to get my period for about 1 1/2 to 2 weeks though. What’s this brown stuff mean?

    • ANSWER:
      Brown discharge usually indicates old blood…if you are a younger teen, it could just be your cycle trying to regulate itself. The first few periods a girl has tend to be “old” blood, meaning the tissue that sloughs off your uterus probably took some time to do so. What you are experiencing is called “spotting”…

      If the discharge is accompanied by fever, cramping or severe pain, go to the Emergency Department. You might have an ovarian cyst. When they rupture, it feels as painful as a miscarriage. (I am speaking from experience.)

      I hope you are not having unprotected sex–if so, it’s only a matter of time until you DO turn up pregnant….of course, if that is your goal, that’s another story.

  16. QUESTION:
    i have a pomeranian who is about 8 yrs old and has never gone into heat. is this possible?
    i believe she is in heat now because the other male dog will not leave her alone. not familiar with female dogs. much.

    • ANSWER:
      You are asking the wrong question. You should be more concerned about getting her spayed ASAP.

      Why you have not before this age is beyond me.

      You are asking for trouble at this age. If you do not spay her be prepared to spend several thousand dollars to save her when she develops a pyometa. Your dog is at the age where it becomes more common.

      Pyometra in the dog is a very serious condition! Before we look at what pyometra is, let’s review the best way to avoid pyometra… and that is spaying. Pyometra means pus in the uterine cavity; if a pet is spayed the uterus and ovaries are removed so there no chance of pyometra developing.

      Usually the procedure is done prior to the first estrus (heat) cycle and having it done at this time greatly lessens the dog’s chances for later development of mammary gland cancer. Some dog owners, for various reasons, want their dog to have one estrus cycle or even one litter of pups before she’s spayed. And some pet owners do not want their pet to undergo any surgery. Personal choices do come with responsibility, too, so it is best to be sure there are homes waiting for any planned pregnancies.

      Probably 80% of dog spays are done prior to the first heat cycle. The other 20% will go into their first heat around 9 -12 months of age and then about every 6 to 7 months thereafter until about 9 or 10 years of age. An unspayed dog does incur some special health risks throughout her life. Mammary cancer, unwanted pregnancies, ovarian cysts and cancer, difficult pregnancies… and fights with wandering male dogs who seem to appear from nowhere during the three week estrus cycle are a few troubles that readily come to mind. Cats generally go into their first heat cycle at 6 to 7 months of age. It seems like they go back into heat whenever they feel like it after that! Technically, cats are seasonally polyestrous… which means they go in and out of heat a few times during certain seasons of the year.

      Here’s a real nasty problem . . . pyometra. The term means pus in the uterus. Any time a veterinarian is presented with a dog or cat suffering from pyometra the condition is considered serious and immediate surgery is nearly always indicated. This pus formation in the uterus results from infection, hormone imbalance or mucous buildup inside the uterus. Most dogs and cats suffering from pyometra are presented because of loss of energy, increased thirst and poor appetite. Plus a good tip-off would be a foul smelling, purulent (means pus) vaginal discharge. Most of the cases of pyometra I’ve seen in dogs occurred about six weeks after the bitch’s last heat cycle. They may not look it on the outside, but on the inside these dogs are really sick! If that swollen, enlarged uterus happens to rupture internally, the dog will rapidly go into endotoxic shock and whatever the veterinarian does may not be enough to save the dog.

      Normally, even in a large dog, the uterine horns aren’t much thicker than a pencil. See the photo on the right for normal anatomy… click it to enlarge. When pyometra is present the uterus looks and feels more like a stuffed venison sausage. I’ve removed eight-pound uteruses that should have weighed no more than eight ounces!

      For whatever reason, if your female dog or cat hasn’t been spayed be alert for pyometra. The condition is more probable in females eight years or older and who experience infrequent or irregular heat cycles or episodes of false pregnancy. Poor appetite, increased thirst, poor stamina and vaginal discharge are cardinal signs. And some patients’ white blood cell count can go from a normal of 9,000 all the way up to 75,000. X-rays often reveal two large sausage-like structures in the abdomen. It’s time for surgery! These patients should almost always be operated on right now, not after work, not in the morning, not after a few days of antibiotics “to build her up.”

      The surgery is not a minor procedure. A patient with a uterus swollen with a foul and putrid soup, is simply carrying a bucket of poison that would eventually kill the cat or dog. Many of these patients require I.V. fluid therapy, antibiotics and nutritional support post-operatively. These pyometra patients, once recovered, act like puppies once their near death experience is over!

      It is not too late to go from being a negligent pet owner to a caring responsible one. Call your vet and make an appointment to get this dog fixed. It will save her life.

  17. QUESTION:
    Is it a ruptured ovarian cyst?
    I have abdominal pain, recently diagnosed with PCOS, nausea, bilateral lower quadrant pain, “hot” belly, and brown discharge with some dark bloody fluid. Is it possible that I have ruptured a cyst? If so must I go to the ER? I don’t have a fever so I am not too worried.

    • ANSWER:
      Hi Kirsten

      Important stuff first. It does sound as if you may have a ruptured ovarian cyst, though often they are accompanied by fever as well as the symptoms you mention. I would certainly recommend that see your doctor soonest (explain to the receptionist, she will fit you in quickly), and IF you develop a fever, then yes, go straight to ER.

      Less urgent. The cysts in PCOS are generally small, they do not rupture and they don’t give these symptoms. If you were diagnosed with PCOS just on the basis of having more than one cyst in your ovary (by ultrasound), then you may want to revisit or challenge that diagnosis. Seeing multiple cysts on ultrasound does NOT necessarily mean PCOS. If, on the other hand, you have been properly diagnosed with PCOS (at least 3 of the classic symptoms, and blood tests to back it up), then ignore this paragraph.

  18. QUESTION:
    Cramping without an actual menstrual cycle?
    Every few months or so I cramp while I’m supposed to be having my cycle, but I don’t actually bleed. Sometimes I’ll come up with a little bit of black discharge later, but I don’t always have an actual period. I’m going to the doctor on Monday, but I assume I should have blood if I’m hurting like I do. I also have been known to have ovarian cysts…but they went away and my doctor said they were normal. Any ideas?

    • ANSWER:
      Ovarian cysts can prevent a period. They can also cause pain. The discharge that you have could be coming from old blood that sometimes occurs after a cyst ruptures. Each month cysts can come and go. However, it is not normal to not have a period every month. This is easily diagnosed and easily treated, providing that the symptoms are only what you have described. You have done the right thing by making an appointment with your doctor.

  19. QUESTION:
    Sharp pain in my lower left quadrant of abdomen?
    Last night, I was on the computer at around 2am when I shifted and had a sharp pain in my lower left side, like the ovary area, and I dismissed it as a possible pinched nerve, as I get those frequently in my heart area for a minute or so. Well, it didn’t go away, and I was beginning to get paranoid of it being a ruptured appendix or something, so I went to go finish my homework, and it continued to ache horribly. I eventually laid down and fell asleep, and this all lasted for about 30 minutes.

    The pain was awful, and it was sharp, like a mass of pinched nerves, and I could barely breathe because the slightest pressure hurt, and I was almost incapable of moving. I would have went to the ER but I dismissed it and hoped to sleep it off. I woke up this morning to feel okay, but I’d have small occasions of pain.. bearable, but I became paranoid and went home early. It’s been a little more sharp now in the lower midsection, and I went to the bathroom and seem a bit constipated, and no other symptoms.

    I’m a 16 year old female, and I have no serious medical history, and I just got over my period yesterday, which lasted 6-8 days; I’ve also had a bit more discharge than usual, but no infection. I heard it can be an ovarian cyst, but I have no idea.

    I know this is long, but.. Any help?

    • ANSWER:

  20. QUESTION:
    I felt and heard a pop in my pelvis then sharp pain what is it?
    I was sitting on the floor playing a board game with my children last week when I felt and heard a pop in my pelvis where my ovaries are. The pain was so intense I could hardly breath, but it only lasted for a few minutes. I sometimes get sharp pain in my pelvis when I stand up quick but I have had this for years so it can’t be anything serious but I am curious what the ‘pop’ in my pelvis could have been. Tracie

    • ANSWER:
      Sounds like you had an ovarian cyst. I have had them for years and normally they really hurt right before and during rupture then almost immediately the pain will subside. Unfortunately they usually are recurring but then again almost always they aren’t serious. I had them for about 20 years and it wasn’t until a few weeks ago when one became infected which led to an infection but my ob/gyn said that is very rare. I wouldn’t worry too much but you should make an appointment and just have it checked out. P. S. Normally you would have some sort of clear discharge after it ruptures too

  21. QUESTION:
    Spotting for abnormally long time, no actual period?
    My periods are always irregular, usually about six per year because of ovulation problems. Ive never really had spotting before, though, ive always had really long, heavy periods. Dec 7, i started spotting, and it continued until Jan 7. Yes, a full month. It stopped, then on Jan 27 i started spotting again, and it stopped yesterday. There was no actual period though, no discharge or cramps or fatigue. What’s up with the spotting? My last actual period was in August. There is no possible way i can be pregnant. Any serious answers will be helpful!
    Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      if you’re sexually active you could have miscarried. you might have had an ovarian cyst that ruptured. I would go to the doctor

  22. QUESTION:
    Should the fluid of a ruptured Ovarian Cyst be a light murky Green colour?

    • ANSWER:
      No, it shouldn’t be visible to you at all. The fluid from a ruptured ovarian cyst is absorbed into your abdomen, it doesn’t come out at all. Whatever you are seeing, which is green and murky, its not that. I would suggest that you see your doc if you have a green discharge from any part of your body.

  23. QUESTION:
    I have just discovered I have a 2-3cm latual cyst on right ovary and multiple cysts on left.?
    I have been refer ed to a specialist, I have been trying to get pregnant since my 1st child was born nearly 10 years ago. Poly cystic ovary was mentioned. What can be done? Anyone been in the same situation? Any advice would be appreciated x

    • ANSWER:
      with my first pregnancy i hade a ovarian cyst that i was not aware of how ever it did rupture and it caused me to lose the baby. I had to have a minor surgery to get rid of the discharge and to check the ovaries and tubes to make sure there was no more or that none of them had been damaged i was told if it happened again they would have to keep doing the surgery. it was very basic 2 cuts and a scope threw the belly button. You should ask your doctor whats the best option though. when mine ruptured he told me if i hadnt gone to the hospital i would have died i passed out couldnt walk was pale not eating and in lots of pain so please go get it fixed.

  24. QUESTION:
    Ovarian Cysts & Pinkish Discharge for a few days?
    Last sunday i had an ovarian cyst that ruptured a few days later i was supposed to start my period instead i got a pinkish discharge that went away in a few days. I have no clue if its related to the cyst or that I might be pregnant…i dont feel like it and “ppl” say you would know after your 1st one…guess im still nieave or in denial in that area…Any clue to what it could be? Serious answers only please.

    • ANSWER:
      when i had a cyst well two of them they did not rupture but sure hurt i didnt have any discharge. idk u need to call your doc.

  25. QUESTION:
    What does brown discharge mean?
    I first got my period when I was 11. It was on a steady cycle for awhile then it got all out of whack. Sometimes I wouldn’t get it for months at a time. Now, I’m 15 and I have almost gone a whole year without it (9-ish months.) Now for some reason I’ve been having this thick brownish discharge but not blood. Its not a lot either. I’m scared it might be an ruptured ovarian cyst.

    • ANSWER:


ovarian cyst rupture discharge

Ovarian Cyst Rupture And Loss Of Appetite

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Would these be considered normal side effects from a morphine injection?
    Yesterday I was in the hospital for a burst ovarian cyst and they gave me morphine for the pain, I also received anti-nausea medication, as well as IV fluids. But now even yesterday when I came home I’ve been having pure liquid diarrhea, severe stomach cramps, nausea (no vomiting), no appetite, and all around feeling crappy. Is this normal or should I go back to the hospital?
    note: The morphine was given by IV

    • ANSWER:
      I would go back to the hospital. Everything sounds like normal side effects of morphine except for the diarrhea. Morphine can cause upset stomach, nausea, vomiting, and *constipation* is the usual main side effect of any type of opiate such as morphine.

      Also, if they gave you something like ondansetron for nausea, that can cause constipation as well.

      Also, I just looked up the GI symptoms of a ruptured ovarian cyst, and this is what it said:

      Digestive Symptoms
      A ruptured ovarian cyst may bring about uncomfortable digestive symptoms that may include frequent bouts with gas or alternating cases of diarrhea and constipation. You may begin to experience indigestion, and you may also have a perpetual feeling of being full regardless of how much you have eaten. You might begin to experience a loss of appetite that could lead to a noticeable weight loss. You may also experience nausea followed by vomiting.

      I would go back ASAP. Hope this helped.

  2. QUESTION:
    i have a pomeranian who is about 8 yrs old and has never gone into heat. is this possible?
    i believe she is in heat now because the other male dog will not leave her alone. not familiar with female dogs. much.

    • ANSWER:
      You are asking the wrong question. You should be more concerned about getting her spayed ASAP.

      Why you have not before this age is beyond me.

      You are asking for trouble at this age. If you do not spay her be prepared to spend several thousand dollars to save her when she develops a pyometa. Your dog is at the age where it becomes more common.

      Pyometra in the dog is a very serious condition! Before we look at what pyometra is, let’s review the best way to avoid pyometra… and that is spaying. Pyometra means pus in the uterine cavity; if a pet is spayed the uterus and ovaries are removed so there no chance of pyometra developing.

      Usually the procedure is done prior to the first estrus (heat) cycle and having it done at this time greatly lessens the dog’s chances for later development of mammary gland cancer. Some dog owners, for various reasons, want their dog to have one estrus cycle or even one litter of pups before she’s spayed. And some pet owners do not want their pet to undergo any surgery. Personal choices do come with responsibility, too, so it is best to be sure there are homes waiting for any planned pregnancies.

      Probably 80% of dog spays are done prior to the first heat cycle. The other 20% will go into their first heat around 9 -12 months of age and then about every 6 to 7 months thereafter until about 9 or 10 years of age. An unspayed dog does incur some special health risks throughout her life. Mammary cancer, unwanted pregnancies, ovarian cysts and cancer, difficult pregnancies… and fights with wandering male dogs who seem to appear from nowhere during the three week estrus cycle are a few troubles that readily come to mind. Cats generally go into their first heat cycle at 6 to 7 months of age. It seems like they go back into heat whenever they feel like it after that! Technically, cats are seasonally polyestrous… which means they go in and out of heat a few times during certain seasons of the year.

      Here’s a real nasty problem . . . pyometra. The term means pus in the uterus. Any time a veterinarian is presented with a dog or cat suffering from pyometra the condition is considered serious and immediate surgery is nearly always indicated. This pus formation in the uterus results from infection, hormone imbalance or mucous buildup inside the uterus. Most dogs and cats suffering from pyometra are presented because of loss of energy, increased thirst and poor appetite. Plus a good tip-off would be a foul smelling, purulent (means pus) vaginal discharge. Most of the cases of pyometra I’ve seen in dogs occurred about six weeks after the bitch’s last heat cycle. They may not look it on the outside, but on the inside these dogs are really sick! If that swollen, enlarged uterus happens to rupture internally, the dog will rapidly go into endotoxic shock and whatever the veterinarian does may not be enough to save the dog.

      Normally, even in a large dog, the uterine horns aren’t much thicker than a pencil. See the photo on the right for normal anatomy… click it to enlarge. When pyometra is present the uterus looks and feels more like a stuffed venison sausage. I’ve removed eight-pound uteruses that should have weighed no more than eight ounces!

      For whatever reason, if your female dog or cat hasn’t been spayed be alert for pyometra. The condition is more probable in females eight years or older and who experience infrequent or irregular heat cycles or episodes of false pregnancy. Poor appetite, increased thirst, poor stamina and vaginal discharge are cardinal signs. And some patients’ white blood cell count can go from a normal of 9,000 all the way up to 75,000. X-rays often reveal two large sausage-like structures in the abdomen. It’s time for surgery! These patients should almost always be operated on right now, not after work, not in the morning, not after a few days of antibiotics “to build her up.”

      The surgery is not a minor procedure. A patient with a uterus swollen with a foul and putrid soup, is simply carrying a bucket of poison that would eventually kill the cat or dog. Many of these patients require I.V. fluid therapy, antibiotics and nutritional support post-operatively. These pyometra patients, once recovered, act like puppies once their near death experience is over!

      It is not too late to go from being a negligent pet owner to a caring responsible one. Call your vet and make an appointment to get this dog fixed. It will save her life.

  3. QUESTION:
    Sharp pain on the right side of my body. Anything serious?
    The pain started a few days ago. At first it was very sporadic but has gradually increased. Today its been happening every 10 minutes or so.

    The pain starts at my waist and shoots down to my hip. It is only on the right side of my body and it shoots directly down my side in only those areas.

    It doesn’t matter the position of my body, nothing helps. Laying, sitting, standing: doesn’t matter.

    Should I be seen by a doctor or is it nothing to worry about?

    • ANSWER:
      I suggest seeing to a doctor right away. I have a similar problem, intense pain in my right side, including my hip. Nothing helps.. I’ve had this since yesterday, and it too is certainly getting more intense pain wise.

      Is the area swollen, or tender to the touch? Does it relieve to press it, but have a sharp pain after releasing pressure? Do you have any other symptoms; nausea and/or vomiting, a temperature and/or chills, loss of appetite – does it hurt to eat/drink, does it hurt to move?

      If you have any more of these symptoms, there is a possibility it could be appendicitis – possibly from the various body positions that lack to relieve the pain.

      However, there is more than the possibility of appendicitis. In the lower right abdomen.

      There are many factors it could be:
      Appendicitis
      Constipation
      Crohn’s Disease
      Diverticulitis
      Ectopic Pregnancy
      Hernia
      Intussusception
      Kidney Stones
      Lymphoma
      Merkels Diverticulum
      Mesenteric Lymphadenitis
      Pelvic Inflammatory Disease
      Psoas Abscess
      Pylonephritis
      Ruptured Ovarian Cyst (if female)
      Twisted Ovarian Cyst (if female)
      Torsion of the Testis (if male)
      Salpingitis
      Sickle Cell Disease
      Ulcerative Colitis
      Ureteric Stone
      Volvolus of the Caecum
      Bowel Cancer

      These are just some serious things it could be.
      However if your female, it could may well be in relation to your menstrual cycle. If your due for a period, it could be pre-menstrual cramps, in prep. Or it could be an ovarian cyst, or something to do with them ovaries and fallopian tubes themselves. However, trapped wind, or constipation could also be questioned.

      Any case of abdominal pain is definitely worth checking out. There are too many vital organs in this area, to wait until a serious cause happens, if that’s the case. If may be something simple, or something rather serious. Only a doctor would know, I’m only going on with what you decribed. It’s worth checking out, you never know!

      Good luck. :)

  4. QUESTION:
    Lower abdominal pain question?
    Recently, I have been having an lower right abdominal pain. I don’t know what is really wrong. However, I have researched appendicitis. I don’t have many of the symptoms though. The only real symptoms I have is pain in my stomach and sometimes a loss of appetite. Is this pain something to worry about? Could I have appendicitis even though I don’t have most of the symptoms? Thanks in advance.

    • ANSWER:
      Some people don’t have symptoms at all if your a women it could be an ovarian cyst but you should go to the doctors to get check out have them do test because you don’t want the appendicitis to rupture if it is the problem if you don’t have insurance just go to the E.R.

  5. QUESTION:
    Possibly PMDD?
    Symptoms:
    Stressed EASILY, crying a good 75% of the time, can’t have fun even in “fun” situations, can’t focus in school, loss of appetite, worried constantly, mildly depressed…

    Also, it was thought that I had an ovarian cyst rupture in August and since then things have gotten MUCH worse.
    It doesn’t seem specifically worse before my period. It’s really anytime around it, more-so after. But for the most part – all the time.

    • ANSWER:
      Twenty to fifty percent of women between the ages of 30 to 40 with regular menstrual cycles experience premenstrual syndrome (PMS) as a regular physiological occurrence every month. In more severe cases, affecting three to five percent of menstruating women, this syndrome is labeled as premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD).

      Patients with severe PMDD are at risk for developing postpartum depression. Furthermore, women successfully treated with antidepressants often show breakthrough symptoms of depression in the premenstrual phase of their menstrual cycle. All that is needed is a small increase in the dosage of the antidepressant premenstrually.

      Women with PMDD complain of irritability, anger, tension, marked depressed mood, and mood lability (crying spells for no reason, verbal outbursts, or tantrums ) to such a severity that quality of life is seriously compromised. In addition to these symptoms, some women complain of lethargy, sleep disturbance, limited concentration and a host of physical symptoms such as breast tenderness, headaches, joint and muscle pain, bloating and weight gain.

      The primary symptoms that distinguish premenstrual dysphoric disorder from other mood disorders (i.e., major depression) or menstrual conditions is the onset and duration of PMDD symptoms with symptoms appearing during the week or so before and disappearing within a few days after the onset of menses and the level by which these symptoms disrupt daily living tasks. (This diminished level of functioning is generally in great contrast with the same woman’s interactions and abilities at other times during the month.)

      The symptoms of PMDD may resemble other conditions or medical problems, such as a thyroid condition, depression, or an anxiety disorder.

      I would recommend consulting with your doctor for diagnosis if you think you are suffering from PMDD.

      Good luck :)

  6. QUESTION:
    RUPTURED OVARIAN CYST?
    i was 12 days late on my period, cramping, nausea, loss of appetite but had 3 negative pregnancy tests.i saw the doctor yesterday, she always seems like you are troubling her and doesn’t seem like she ever listens completely to you. i went in for blood work which came back a negative on the pregnancy test. i went in for an ultrasound this morning and they called me back to tell me it was a ruptured ovarian cyst. and not to worry. don’t worry?! the pains in my lower abdomin hurt so bad, i was reading up on it and it says i may need antibotics and possible pain medication, but why is my doctor acting like its no big deal?

    • ANSWER:
      i would switch and find a new doctor quickly. any doctor who doesn’t give you the time of day to listen isn’t worth taking care of you. i would recommend going on a birth control pill because these can help ease and get rid of cyst.

  7. QUESTION:
    Help! I don’t know what’s causing this pain… ?
    At the moment I’m experiencing a pain in my lower right abdomen, I’ve had this pain before and it was an ovarian cyst. I’m trying to determine if it’s my appendix or an ovarian cyst like last time. I wanted to know if the pain of appendicitis so unbearable that I would not be able to tolerate it? If it’s merely the abdominal pain is it unlikely it’s my appendix? And any ideas to help the pain?

    • ANSWER:
      Abdominal pain can be many things, you should get it checked by a doctor. I found the following under prevention.com symptom checker. However as I said it can be other things, and the best thing to do is go to a doctor.

      Good Luck and Get Well

      The symptoms of appendicitis vary. It can be hard to diagnose appendicitis in young children, the elderly, and women of childbearing age.

      Typically, the first symptom is pain around your belly button. (See: abdominal pain.) The pain may be vague at first, but becomes increasingly sharp and severe. You may have reduced appetite, nausea, vomiting, and a low-grade fever.

      As the inflammation in the appendix increases, the pain tends to move into your right lower abdomen and focuses directly above the appendix at a place called McBurney’s point.

      If the appendix ruptures, the pain may lessen briefly and you may feel better. However, once the lining of the abdominal cavity becomes inflammed and infected (a condition called peritonitis), the pain worsens and you become sicker.

      Abdominal pain may be worse when walking or coughing. You may prefer to lie still because sudden movement causes pain.

      Later symptoms include:

      * Chills
      * Constipation
      * Diarrhea
      * Fever
      * Loss of appetite
      * Nausea
      * Shaking
      * Vomiting

  8. QUESTION:
    Is this normal with a ruptured ovarian cyst?
    I started having lower right side abdominal pain on Monday. By Tuesday it started to hurt badly. On Wednesday I had an acupuncture appointment and he told me he was worried I had a kidney infection so he scheduled me an appointment with the nurse practitioner 45 minutes later. She told me I needed to rush to the hospital because she was sure I had appendicitis. After an ultra sound and CT scan they told me they thought I had a ruptured ovarian cyst. They gave me vicodin and anti nausea pills. I was taking 2 vicodins every 4 hours and the nausea pills every 8 hours. I still felt awful and crying in pain. We went back to the hospital last night and they confirmed what the other hospital said after doing another ultra sound. But my pain was supposed to have gotten better by today, but I still feel awful… Maybe even worse. I think it’s something else because it hurts horribly when I eat or drink ANYTHING. Even water and simple foods.
    My symtoms are:
    Lower right abdominal pain
    Middle/ upper middle abdominal pain
    Entire abdomen tender to the touch
    Low fever (99.9-102F)
    Loss of appetite
    Pain eating
    Nausea
    Bloating
    Loud grumbly stomach
    Constipation
    Cramps throughout stomach
    Pain behind right breast bone at times

    Pain has been pretty constant.

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, all these symptoms are normal with a ruptured ovarian cyst.

  9. QUESTION:
    Real sudden loss of appetite and I’m shivering?
    Starting yesterday I have had a VERY sudden loss of appetite that leaves me sick to my stomach when I think about food.
    Usually I pig out on food when I’m bored, but it all upsets my stomach.
    I ate today, but had to force myself to finish it because I got too sick.
    I was on pain meds a few days ago for severe stomach pains brought on by a ruptured ovarian cyst, so idk if thats why.
    Then again I have also been real stressed out for the past few days, so idk…
    Also, I’m FREEZING to death! The heat is on in my house (It’s on 85!) and I’m usually VERY sensitive to heat, but I’m just so cold :(

    can anyone explain these two things?

    • ANSWER:
      Freezing, shivering, not hungry…
      This probably isn’t the answer you’re looking for, but it sounds a bit like you might have a fever. Have you taken your temperature?

  10. QUESTION:
    Hemorrhagic ovarian cyst or UTI?
    Sudden sharp pain in my lower right abdomen, it was clearly localized to that area and pain is almost 8 out of 10 in pain scale. I thought I have appendicitis but after a while the pain lessened and is diffused throughout my lower abdomen with my lower right still more painful. The next day I also have painful lower back. I’ve also been suffering from nausea, dizziness, loss of appetite and low-grade fever. Sometimes I get cold sweats. We went to the hospital for urinalysis. But I’m not having trouble peeing, it’s not painful, urgent or anything. It’s still clear and doesn’t have foul smell. The result of urinalysis showed elevated pus and RBC. I also had CBC and showed elevated WBC in my blood indicating infection. When I had pelvic ultrasound, my kidney, ureters, urethra and bladder are all normal. But they found out I have 4.2 x 3.7 hemorrhagic ovarian cyst which is probably what’s causing pain in my lower right abdomen. Is this size something I should worry about? My OB says its nothing but I’m feeling pain even if I’m already taking antibiotics and pain meds. Does ‘hemorrhagic’ means it has already ruptured and thus causing the infection? Or do I really have UTI?

    • ANSWER:

  11. QUESTION:
    Please read and answer! does this sound like Herpes or HPV???? Thanks?
    my 3 month History

    *Had protected sex the first time on February 16 then again (12 days later same guy still protected) on February 31.
    *March 3 (three days later) I got my period during that time I had a yeast infection. treated it with miconazole went away by the end of my period
    *period ended on march 10. From the end of my period I began to have abdominal pains up until march 21 I sucked it up until I started to get cramps in my upper right thigh.
    *I went to the emergency room on March 21. The doc said I had a ruptured ovarian cyst. (No meds for that Just ibuprofen) On March 26 I went back to the ER because I still had pain. They just found I had a UTI coming on (e coli in urine) so they gave me Nitrofurant (100mg) *Woke up March 30 around 5am and I was vomiting followed by a loss of appetite, dizziness, chest pains, etc. so that morning I wen to a different ER. they couldn’t find anything but they look me off of the UTI medicine and put me on Levaquin (250mg).
    *They called me back on March 31 and told me they found that my Liver may be swollen and maybe a little fluid around my heart. (one doc found it normal, the other didn’t)… they still didn’t find any source of infection (they did tons of blood work 13 different samples that day!)
    *I went to the GYN on April 2. she put me on birth control to stop ovulation so my ovarian cyst wouldn’t be irritated) this was followed by brown discharge. *I went to my primary care doctor on April 3 she took me off of the birth control my period came on April 5 came off April 9 (short for me). April 9 I had an Ultrasound done on my chest (for liver), right Leg (still waiting for results) and blood work. the blood work read that my White blood count is slightly low and my liver reading came back normal.
    *april 19 I had an HIV test it was negative. I will get tested again but I’m pretty sure that’s not it’s because people who experience early HIV symptoms should test positive at the point of showing symptoms.
    *went to primary care doctor again she set me up to go to the gyn again and also an ultrasound on my chest. They drew my blood (CPK) for the leg pains and everything was normal.
    Wondering if I could have anxiety. Right now I’m still feeling cramps & sharp pains in my chest (left & right). I also hear noises in my abdomen, it rises then goes down, and feel cramping (not as much).
    Had another HIV test after 3 months since I last had sex (Negative)
    I am getting vaginal discharge. So I went to the GYN on May 16 for a pap smear still waiting for the results and the doctor said I had no yeast… I have also gotten some more blood work for HIV, HSV, and HPV (still waiting for these results) as of now its been 3 months since Ive had sex and I am feeling vaginal discomfort inside.
    Recently I have been feeling a tingling sensation in my right buttocks (same side I was feeling the leg pain, after sitting too long (I’ve found that my tailbone isn’t exactly even back there)
    And i have felt tenderness where my vagina joins with my leg (also right)

    Does any of these symptoms sound like an STD… please give some detail… I have been trying to figure this out for month!

    Thank You

    • ANSWER:
      Doesn’t sound at all like any STD. Sounds to me like the effects of a ruptured cyst, and then starting birth control. The tingly feeling sounds like a touch of sciatica, which is irritation of a nerve, but nothing to do with sex. Sounds like anxiety for everything else.

  12. QUESTION:
    What is wrong with me? Please read.. Thanks!?
    *Had protected sex the first time on February 16 then again (12 days later same guy still protected) on February 31.
    *March 3 (three days later) I got my period during that time I had a yeast infection. treated it with miconazole went away by the end of my period
    *period ended on march 10. From the end of my period I began to have abdominal pains up until march 21 I sucked it up until I started to get cramps in my upper right thigh.
    *I went to the emergency room on March 21. The doc said I had a ruptured ovarian cyst. (No meds for that Just ibuprofen) On March 26 I went back to the ER because I still had pain. They just found I had a UTI coming on (e coli in urine) so they gave me Nitrofurant (100mg) *Woke up March 30 around 5am and I was vomiting followed by a loss of appetite, dizziness, chest pains, etc. so that morning I wen to a different ER. they couldn’t find anything but they look me off of the UTI medicine and put me on Levaquin (250mg).
    *They called me back on March 31 and told me they found that my Liver may be swollen and maybe a little fluid around my heart. (one doc found it normal, the other didn’t)… they still didn’t find any source of infection (they did tons of blood work 13 different samples that day!)
    *I went to the GYN on April 2. she put me on birth control to stop ovulation so my ovarian cyst wouldn’t be irritated) this was followed by brown discharge. *I went to my primary care doctor on April 3 she took me off of the birth control my period came on April 5 came off April 9 (short for me). April 9 I had an Ultrasound done on my chest (for liver), right Leg (still waiting for results) and blood work. the blood work read that my White blood count is slightly low and my liver reading came back normal.
    *april 19 I had an HIV test it was negative. I will get tested again but I’m pretty sure that’s not it’s because people who experience early HIV symptoms should test positive at the point of showing symptoms.
    *went to primary care doctor again she set me up to go to the gyn again and also an ultrasound on my chest. They drew my blood (CPK) for the leg pains and everything was normal.
    Wondering if I could have anxiety. Right now I’m still feeling cramps & sharp pains in my chest (left & right). I also hear noises in my abdomen, it rises then goes down, and feel cramping (not as much).
    Had another HIV test after 3 months since I last had sex (Negative)
    I am getting vaginal discharge. So I went to the GYN on May 16 for a pap smear still waiting for the results and the doctor said I had no yeast… I have also gotten some more blood work for HIV, HSV, and HPV (still waiting for these results) as of now its been 3 months since Ive had sex and I am feeling vaginal discomfort inside.
    Recently I have been feeling a tingling sensation in my right buttocks (same side I was feeling the leg pain, after sitting too long (I’ve found that my tailbone isn’t exactly even back there)
    And i have felt tenderness where my vagina joins with my leg (also right)

    Does any of these symptoms sound like an STD… please give some detail… I have been trying to figure this out for month!

    Thank You

    • ANSWER:
      I felt really sorry for your problem ! I think you are married and had sex with your partner ! That’s according to laws of God and i appreciate it ! If you didn’t try to live according to 10 laws of God upto now don’t worry ! Jesus is finding lost sheeps in this world.Be a good girl now on !

      Please pray to Jesus(God) to help to cure your illness ! You must only have faith and believe him from your heart ! He will take care rest of your problem.There are miracles happening all around the world.He is the doctor for any illness.I will pray for you ! Take medicines from a good doctor too.Many doctors doing their carrier as a business.They don’t love to cure people. So better to change your doctor or (blood or urine) testing place if you are not confident of the results.

  13. QUESTION:
    I last had sex 3 months ago now I’m experiencing vaginal itch… Dr. said there was no yeast … what is it?
    my 3 month History

    *Had protected sex the first time on February 16 then again (12 days later same guy still protected) on February 31.
    *March 3 (three days later) I got my period during that time I had a yeast infection. treated it with miconazole went away by the end of my period
    *period ended on march 10. From the end of my period I began to have abdominal pains up until march 21 I sucked it up until I started to get cramps in my upper right thigh.
    *I went to the emergency room on March 21. The doc said I had a ruptured ovarian cyst. (No meds for that Just ibuprofen) On March 26 I went back to the ER because I still had pain. They just found I had a UTI coming on (e coli in urine) so they gave me Nitrofurant (100mg) *Woke up March 30 around 5am and I was vomiting followed by a loss of appetite, dizziness, chest pains, etc. so that morning I wen to a different ER. they couldn’t find anything but they look me off of the UTI medicine and put me on Levaquin (250mg).
    *They called me back on March 31 and told me they found that my Liver may be swollen and maybe a little fluid around my heart. (one doc found it normal, the other didn’t)… they still didn’t find any source of infection (they did tons of blood work 13 different samples that day!)
    *I went to the GYN on April 2. she put me on birth control to stop ovulation so my ovarian cyst wouldn’t be irritated) this was followed by brown discharge. *I went to my primary care doctor on April 3 she took me off of the birth control my period came on April 5 came off April 9 (short for me). April 9 I had an Ultrasound done on my chest (for liver), right Leg (still waiting for results) and blood work. the blood work read that my White blood count is slightly low and my liver reading came back normal.
    *april 19 I had an HIV test it was negative. I will get tested again but I’m pretty sure that’s not it’s because people who experience early HIV symptoms should test positive at the point of showing symptoms.
    *went to primary care doctor again she set me up to go to the gyn again and also an ultrasound on my chest. They drew my blood (CPK) for the leg pains and everything was normal.
    Wondering if I could have anxiety. Right now I’m still feeling cramps & sharp pains in my chest (left & right). I also hear noises in my abdomen, it rises then goes down, and feel cramping (not as much).
    Had another HIV test after 3 months since I last had sex (Negative)
    I am getting vaginal discharge. So I went to the GYN on May 16 for a pap smear still waiting for the results and the doctor said I had no yeast… I have also gotten some more blood work for HIV, HSV, and HPV (still waiting for these results) as of now its been 3 months since Ive had sex and I am feeling vaginal discomfort inside.
    Recently I have been feeling a tingling sensation in my right buttocks (same side I was feeling the leg pain, after sitting too long (I’ve found that my tailbone isn’t exactly even back there)
    And i have felt tenderness where my vagina joins with my leg (also right)

    Does any of these symptoms sound like an STD… please give some detail… I have been trying to figure this out for month!

    Thank You
    jeanb … what symptoms were similar to HPV? I couldn’t find any information about symptoms except the warts itself.

    • ANSWER:

  14. QUESTION:
    Is this an STD?! If so why didn’t the doctors acknowledge that it possibly was?
    *Had protected sex the first time on February 16 then again (12 days later same guy still protected) on February 31. *March 3 (three days later) I got my period during that time I had a yeast infection. treated it with miconazole went away by the end of my period *period ended on march 10. From the end of my period I began to have abdominal pains up until march 21 I sucked it up until I started to get cramps in my upper right thigh. *I went to the emergency room on March 21. The doc said I had a ruptured ovarian cyst. (No meds for that Just ibuprofen) On March 26 I went back to the ER because I still had pain. They just found I had a UTI coming on (e coli in urine) so they gave me Nitrofurant (100mg) *Woke up March 30 around 5am and I was vomiting followed by a loss of appetite, dizziness, chest pains, etc. so that morning I wen to a different ER. they couldn’t find anything but they look me off of the UTI medicine and put me on Levaquin (250mg). *They called me back on March 31 and told me they found that my Liver may be swollen and maybe a little fluid around my heart. (one doc found it normal, the other didn’t)… they still didn’t find any source of infection (they did tons of blood work 13 different samples that day!) *I went to the GYN on April 2. she put me on birth control to stop ovulation so my ovarian cyst wouldn’t be irritated) this was followed by brown discharge. *I went to my primary care doctor on April 3 she took me off of the birth control my period came on April 5 came off April 9 (short for me). April 9 I had an Ultrasound done on my chest (for liver), right Leg (still waiting for results) and blood work. the blood work read that my White blood count is slightly low and my liver reading came back normal. *april 19 I had an HIV test it was negative. I will get tested again but I’m pretty sure that’s not it’s because people who experience early HIV symptoms should test positive at the point of showing symptoms. *went to primary care doctor again sh

    • ANSWER:
      None of your symptoms suggest an STD.

  15. QUESTION:
    REALLY NEED MEDICAL ADVICE. 10 points!!!?
    I started having lower right side abdominal pain on Monday. By Tuesday it started to hurt badly. On Wednesday I had an acupuncture appointment and he told me he was worried I had a kidney infection so he scheduled me an appointment with the nurse practitioner 45 minutes later. She told me I needed to rush to the hospital because she was sure I had appendicitis. After an ultra sound and CT scan they told me they thought I had a ruptured ovarian cyst. They gave me vicodin and anti nausea pills. I was taking 2 vicodins every 4 hours and the nausea pills every 8 hours. I still felt awful and crying in pain. We went back to the hospital last night and they confirmed what the other hospital said after doing another ultra sound. But my pain was supposed to have gotten better by today, but I still feel awful… Maybe even worse. I think it’s something else because it hurts horribly when I eat or drink ANYTHING. Even water and simple foods.
    My symtoms are:
    Lower right abdominal pain
    Middle/ upper middle abdominal pain
    Entire abdomen tender to the touch
    Low fever (99.9-102F)
    Loss of appetite
    Pain eating
    Nausea
    Bloating
    Loud grumbly stomach
    Constipation
    Cramps throughout stomach
    Pain behind right breast bone at times

    Pain has been pretty constant.

    • ANSWER:
      The ruptured ovarian cyst is probably the main source of pain. Have you had blood work to rule out appendicitis? If not, it might be wise. You could have two things causing the pain. With respect to the constipation, it could very easily have been brought on by the Vicodin. An enema is contraindicated given the pain on your right side. I would suggest that you ask your doctor if you could use a glycerin suppository to get relief.
      I certainly hope that the doctors get to the bottom of your situation and get you some relief.

  16. QUESTION:
    Please help, really really sick?
    I started having lower right side abdominal pain on Monday. By Tuesday it started to hurt badly. On Wednesday I had an acupuncture appointment and he told me he was worried I had a kidney infection so he scheduled me an appointment with the nurse practitioner 45 minutes later. She told me I needed to rush to the hospital because she was sure I had appendicitis. After an ultra sound and CT scan they told me they thought I had a ruptured ovarian cyst. They gave me vicodin and anti nausea pills. I was taking 2 vicodins every 4 hours and the nausea pills every 8 hours. I still felt awful and crying in pain. We went back to the hospital last night and they confirmed what the other hospital said after doing another ultra sound. But my pain was supposed to have gotten better by today, but I still feel awful… Maybe even worse. I think it’s something else because it hurts horribly when I eat or drink ANYTHING. Even water and simple foods.
    My symtoms are:
    Lower right abdominal pain
    Middle/ upper middle abdominal pain
    Entire abdomen tender to the touch
    Low fever (99.9-102F)
    Loss of appetite
    Pain eating
    Nausea
    Bloating
    Loud grumbly stomach
    Constipation
    Cramps throughout stomach
    Pain behind right breast bone at times

    Pain has been pretty constant.

    • ANSWER:
      Hi Keziah. You need to go back to the doctor.

  17. QUESTION:
    Ovarian cancer, ob/gyn in no rush!!!?
    So I literally have all of the symptoms of OvCa and have for a while. All year I’ve been describing different issues to my dr. All of which he says are caused by “normal ” common causes none related and all he’s dismissed very passively. Ok well now my symptoms ( bloating, constant pain/pressure, back pain, loss of appetite, painful sex, noticeable change in waistline at least 2 inches in past month, feels like I’m 4 months pregnant, urination is off the charts frequent & never feels completely emptied, several episodes of such severe pain nearly caused me to pass out, so much pressure it feels like my stomach will explode & my insides cool fall straight out my butt!!!))) Have gotten worse and are constant every single day!

    I tried to get an emergency ultrasound done, thinking I was having another cyst rupture – didn’t happen… called asked that laporoscopy be scheduled, they agreed to schedule but it’s been 2 days no appointment set nor returned calls….. called again today to request ca-125 blood test in meantime they “give it to the nurse” never heard anything at all.

    I’m freaking out bc I know for a fact something is very wrong!! What do I do????

    How can I make the dr’s office understand the urgency and/or start taking action immediately? ??

    • ANSWER:
      Chill out! Be patient, your doctor knows what to do. You likely don’t have OvCa, but even if you did, it is not an emergency like a heart attack or respiratory failure. If you don’t like this doctor or the way you have been treated, find another one.

  18. QUESTION:
    how common are the side effects of alesse-28?
    okay, recently i wen to the gyno for an ultra sound due to severe pelvic pain. they found that i had a ovarian cyst rupture and perscribed Aless-28 to help reduce my risk of getting another one. I think im getting the generic form, im only 15 and ive read alot of really bad reviews. i heard it causes acne and weight gain. i already have a problem with acne and i really dont want to gain any weight because ive been trying to lose some. im already 141 pounds and 5/7 so i look fine but still. im really worried because of all the bad side effects. just wondering how it could possibly effect a 15 year old girl (who is not active by the way, just need it so my sticking ovary dosent rupture).

    • ANSWER:
      The sid effects that i list will effect in some part anyone that takes–alesse-28
      The following side effects are associated with Alesse-28 Oral:

      Common side effects:
      Breast Tenderness Less Severe
      Breast Fullness due to Milk Production Less Severe
      Acne Less Severe
      Dizzy Less Severe
      Low Energy Less Severe
      Visible Water Retention Less Severe
      Feel Like Throwing Up Less Severe
      Throwing Up Less Severe
      Bloating Less Severe
      Stomach Cramps Less Severe
      Feeling Weak Less Severe
      Water Retention Less Severe

      Infrequent side effects:
      Migraine Headache Severe
      High Blood Pressure Severe
      Frequent Headaches Severe
      Yeast Infection of Vagina and Vulva Severe
      Abnormal Test Result for the Body’s Sugar Tolerance Severe
      Sun-Sensitive Skin Less Severe
      Hair Loss Less Severe
      Abnormal Hair Growth on Body or Face Less Severe
      Yellow-Brown Patches on Skin Less Severe
      Weight Gain Less Severe
      Weight Loss Less Severe
      Altered Interest in Having Sexual Intercourse Less Severe

      Rare side effects:
      Depression Severe
      Sudden Blindness and Pain Upon Moving the Eye Severe
      Pancreatitis Severe
      Heart Attack Severe
      Stroke Severe
      Obstruction of a Blood Vessel by a Blood Clot Severe
      Blood Clot Severe
      Hepatitis Severe
      Disease of the Gallbladder Severe
      Inflammation or Infection of Vagina Severe
      Absence of Menstrual Periods Severe
      Irregular Periods Severe
      Bleeding Not Related to Menstrual Period Severe
      Benign Tumor of Liver Cells Severe
      Liver Cancer Severe
      Breast Tumor Severe
      High Amount of Triglyceride in the Blood Severe
      Cervical Discharge Less Severe
      Focal Nodular Hyperplasia of Liver Less Severe
      Change in Appetite Less Severe

  19. QUESTION:
    Strange stomach symptoms….pregnant?
    I have not had a period since the first wk of May. My cycle has been irregular since around February or March. I took a test in June but it was negative. I was thinking that maybe I had ovarian cysts or something because I have had a soreness-like feeling in my lower abdomen for awhile now. (Can’t get into gyn until Sept). It feels almost like a mild cramp, but more like muscle soreness. My boobs have been a little sore for the past week. Since last Thursday, I have had a lot of nausea, loss of appetite, and heartburn from the time I get up until around 2 or 3 in the afternoon. I already have a 2 year old, and the nausea resembles how I felt when I was pregnant with him, but I didn’t have any of the soreness in my abdomen and my boobs were a lot more sore. My husband is supposed to bring home a pregnancy test when he gets off work. I’m really worried that it’s a more serious health problem. But does it sound like I could be pregnant?
    I took a test this morning and it was positive…faint plus sign, but definitely there. So now I am very worried about the abdominal pain I’ve been having. Do you really think it could be cysts and not a pregnancy?

    • ANSWER:
      Many women experience no symptoms when they have an ovarian cyst, particularly if it’s small. Certain cysts grow large and may cause the abdomen to swell. Depending on where the cyst is and its size, it may put pressure on the bladder or bowels, making you need to go to the toilet more often. You may also notice abdominal discomfort and sex may be uncomfortable or painful. Your periods may be affected; they may become irregular or the bleeding may be heavier or lighter than usual.

      I had cysts last year, they caused three positive tests. Doctor confirmed a pregnancy. I was then told that I had miscarried. After waiting six weeks for a period to come and having nothing I went in for a scan and they confirmed that I was never pregnant and that the cysts had caused the positive results. A couple of weeks later my stomach started cramping, it was the worst pain in the world, sort of like having your insides ripped out through your belly button. I couldn’t do anything to ease the pain and was taken into hospital. Turns out the cysts had ruptured. This was the only symptom I had to indicate them.

      I really hope that you get the positive result. If it comes back negative make an appointment with your doctor as you may need a blood test to detect the pregnancy or at least to find out why you are having these symptoms.

      Good luck. X

  20. QUESTION:
    Sudden left abdominal pain, vaginal bleeding, nausea, headaches. What’s wrong with me?
    udden left abdominal pain, vaginal bleeding, nausea, headaches. What’s wrong with me?

    this year i have had all sorts of problems, chlamydia infection, uti, tursh x2, vaginosis, two days ago i started feeling bloated and experienced extremely painful headaches, they lasted for a few seconds and felt like someone hit me on the head with extreme force. that night i was sitting by the computer and suddenly experienced the following symtoms:
    – nausea
    – severe stabbing pain on the left side of my abdomen (radiating from my ribs to my groin)
    i was unable to move for hours and finally forced myself to bed. the next morning i woke to no pain and had a shower. after my shower i felt discharge flood out of my vagina, it was dark brown with some red blood in it, it smelt like blood too. i am on the depo injection and have not had my period in 2 months. the left sided abdominal pain returned also, this time more apparent in my lower abdomen.
    i am still feeling the same pain, very bloated, and the vaginal bleeding only happened once. i have also seen 3 doctors all of which diagnosed me with different things
    – kidney stones
    – pelvic inflammatory disease
    -ruptured ovarian cyst
    -constipation
    i had an ultrasound and it found that my left ovary was larger than my right and there was fluid in the pouch of douglas. i am 22 years old, sexually active with my boyfriend and have done one pregnancy test which was negative.
    i have also experience other symptoms over the past few years:
    - irregular periods, excessive sweating, constipation, sciatica, back pain, poor hearing/vision, increased appetite, hair loss.
    could somebody please help me, i have never felt pain like this before!!

    i just had a pregnancy test, the bleeding was yesterday morning
    i thought the pain was due to constipation but after having a poo i still have the pain
    i also have very painful breasts

    • ANSWER:
      I’d say your just young and very unlucky. All 3 doctors seemed to have found a different yet correct diagnosis of multiple ails due to your prior health concerns. The brownish red discharge would also be typical from contracting ongoing STD related problems or even from implantation bleeding or using the pill and so on. I take it you’ve had a cervical screen by now which found the cyst which means you could be at risk of a cancer. I would ask for a referral to be admitted to hospital so you can get specialised care immediately for the pain and the numerous health issues your facing.

      Good luck and take care.

  21. QUESTION:
    Sudden left abdominal pain, vaginal bleeding, nausea, headaches. What’s wrong with me?
    this year i have had all sorts of problems, chlamydia infection, uti, tursh x2, vaginosis, two days ago i started feeling bloated and experienced extremely painful headaches, they lasted for a few seconds and felt like someone hit me on the head with extreme force. that night i was sitting by the computer and suddenly experienced the following symtoms:
    – nausea
    – severe stabbing pain on the left side of my abdomen (radiating from my ribs to my groin)
    i was unable to move for hours and finally forced myself to bed. the next morning i woke to no pain and had a shower. after my shower i felt discharge flood out of my vagina, it was dark brown with some red blood in it, it smelt like blood too. i am on the depo injection and have not had my period in 2 months. the left sided abdominal pain returned also, this time more apparent in my lower abdomen.
    i am still feeling the same pain, very bloated, and the vaginal bleeding only happened once. i have also seen 3 doctors all of which diagnosed me with different things
    – kidney stones
    – pelvic inflammatory disease
    -ruptured ovarian cyst
    -constipation
    i had an ultrasound and it found that my left ovary was larger than my right and there was fluid in the pouch of douglas. i am 22 years old, sexually active with my boyfriend and have done one pregnancy test which was negative.
    i have also experience other symptoms over the past few years:
    - irregular periods, excessive sweating, constipation, sciatica, back pain, poor hearing/vision, increased appetite, hair loss.
    could somebody please help me, i have never felt pain like this before!!

    i just had the pregnancy test, the bleeding was yesterday morning
    i thought the pain was due to constipation but after having a poo i still have the pain
    i also have very painful breasts

    • ANSWER:
      I’m no doctor and no one yahoo answers is! What you are dealing with sounds really serious as you have a lot of past symptoms that could directly cause other issues that can be very threatening to your health, my suggestion is that you go to a doctor and tell them what you just told us! Don’t believe what any of the online symptom checkers say, they usually go straight to the worst and most rare possibly. Please, see a real doctor.

  22. QUESTION:
    Sudden left abdominal pain, vaginal bleeding, nausea, headaches. What’s wrong with me?
    this year i have had all sorts of problems, chlamydia infection, uti, tursh x2, vaginosis, two days ago i started feeling bloated and experienced extremely painful headaches, they lasted for a few seconds and felt like someone hit me on the head with extreme force. that night i was sitting by the computer and suddenly experienced the following symtoms:
    - nausea
    - severe stabbing pain on the left side of my abdomen (radiating from my ribs to my groin)
    i was unable to move for hours and finally forced myself to bed. the next morning i woke to no pain and had a shower. after my shower i felt discharge flood out of my vagina, it was dark brown with some red blood in it, it smelt like blood too. i am on the depo injection and have not had my period in 2 months. the left sided abdominal pain returned also, this time more apparent in my lower abdomen.
    i am still feeling the same pain, very bloated, and the vaginal bleeding only happened once. i have also seen 3 doctors all of which diagnosed me with different things
    - kidney stones
    - pelvic inflammatory disease
    -ruptured ovarian cyst
    -constipation
    i had an ultrasound and it found that my left ovary was larger than my right and there was fluid in the pouch of douglas. i am 22 years old, sexually active with my boyfriend and have done one pregnancy test which was negative.
    i have also experience other symptoms over the past few years:
    - irregular periods, excessive sweating, constipation, sciatica, back pain, poor hearing/vision, increased appetite, hair loss.
    could somebody please help me, i have never felt pain like this before!!
    i just had the pregnancy test, the bleeding was yesterday morning

    • ANSWER:

  23. QUESTION:
    Ovarian cyst worries…. Help?
    For a loooong time I have had really bad pain in my lower left pelvis. It comes and goes for a week or so at a time. I have other symptoms too, fatigue, weakness, pain during sex and feeling full all the time with loss of appetite. After almost a year of the doctor telling me nothing was wrong with me I finally got them to do an ultrasound today. They found a 3cm cyst on my ovary that has caused my ovary to swell to twice its normal size. The ultrasound tech showed me this but the results won’t be to my doctor for 3-5 days.

    I am just wondering what to expect. I’ve done a lot of reading and it seems that anything over 2 cm that lasts more than 3 menstrual cycles and causes pain requires surgery. Anybody have any further knowledge or personal experience with this? I’m kinda terrified of surgery. And my grandmother died from ovarian cancer so I’m a little nervous, although I’m trying not to worry until I know more.

    • ANSWER:
      Ovarian cysts are actually pretty common. It’s likely that since the pain comes and goes, you may have had other cysts that persist but then rupture, which can cause pain. If it is large and causing great discomfort, they may choose to remove it. Or they may try a less drastic approach first like birth control pills to see if that helps it regress at all. Either way, I wouldn’t let it worry you too much. :)

  24. QUESTION:
    Ovarian cyst advice please?
    I have a cyst on my right ovary, it was the size of a large grape when I was diagnosed. I have a lot of pain, mostly around my hip, but does come up to near the bottom of my ribs. my belly is really tender near my hip. I have a slightly raised temp [101.3/38.5] & I feel really sick. I have no loss of appetite. I keep getting really lightheaded with the pain. does it sound like I need to be checked out today or can it wait till I can see my doctor?

    • ANSWER:
      These are typical symptoms of cysts I actually just had surgery to remove one on each ovary so I know what u are going thought but with u having a fever I would differently get checked out and have a ultra sound done to see if it ruptured grape size isn’t that big and really shouldnt be a concern of rupture have u tried anti inflammatory pills like Advil theses helped me a lot with my pain

  25. QUESTION:
    Pain in lower left abdomen, not sure if it could be an ovarian cyst or part of constipation?
    two nights ago I developed a pain in my left ovary area. Yesterday it lasted for 10 hours, but it was dull at some moments then a stabbing pain frequently that hurt so bad it had me in tears. today it has been just dull and not bad. I have been suffering from first diarrhea, now constipation. ive tried everything! now no stool even comes out, its just flesh colored mucus and a tiny bit of blood. I also have some dizziness, nausea, hot flashes, and loss of appetite. I was wondering if it could be due to my horrible constipation, but then was thinking a possible cyst because it happened to start right when my period started and it feels a lot like a menstrual cramp, just way worse. I want to see a doctor, but I have no health insurance at the moment, so i’m waiting it out as long as I can. Any ideas? (also, I first was alarmed because I felt like some of these were pregnancy symptoms, but I am on my 3rd regular period since intercourse and I took a home pregnancy test just in case and that was negative). I’m getting worried about my condition

    • ANSWER:
      Signs and Symptoms of an Ovarian Cyst

      Ovarian cyst is a common occurrence in women. In fact, it is said that most women get ovarian cyst at least once during their childbearing years. However, all of them do not get symptoms. The first ovarian cyst sign is pain and discomfort in the lower abdomen region. It mostly occurs intermittently. Ovarian cyst pain is different for individual cases. It can be an acute pain that lasts for just few minutes or it could be a dull pain that continues for few days. It is either felt in one or both sides of the abdomen. In some cases, pain may be accompanied by fever. Sometimes, the pain may get extended to the lower back and the thighs. Some of the other general complaints of women with ovarian cyst are as follows:

      •Swelling in the abdomen which is often accompanied by a bloated feeling.
      •Irregularities in menstrual cycles that causes delay in period. Some women experience severe pain before or during the periods. Heavy bleeding is likely to occur in many cases.
      •Frequent urge to urinate. This happens when the cyst exerts pressure on bladder. In this condition, acute pain is often experienced while urinating. As a result, emptying bladder becomes difficult.
      •Pain experienced during bowel movement because of pressure put on the bowels by the cyst.
      •Intense pelvic pain after or during sexual intercourse.
      •Nausea, vomiting, and bloating.
      •Breast tenderness and increase in growth of body hair which are triggered by abnormality in hormonal production.
      •Increase in body weight and frequent acne outbreaks may occur when multiple number of ovaries are formed in the ovary. This condition is also known as polycystic ovarian syndrome.

      An ovarian cyst can lead to a lot of health complications. If it gets twisted, blood supply to the cyst stops which badly aggravates the pain. When the cyst becomes large, then there are chances that it may burst.

      Ruptured ovarian cyst symptoms are much more severe than a normal cyst. Here, an intense pain starts all of a sudden and it comes along with lightheadedness, cold hand and feet, breathing difficulty, etc. If ovarian cysts are formed during pregnancy, it can lead to several complications. The symptoms of an ovarian cyst in pregnancy are visible when size of the cyst is quite large or it bursts. The unbearable pain in this condition may cause miscarriage or pre-term labor.

      Ovarian Cyst Treatment

      The treatment for ovarian cyst is based upon a number of factors including its size, location and symptoms. When the symptoms show up occasionally and are not much bothersome, then doctors monitor the cyst with ultrasound after regular interval of time to check any change in size or characteristics of the cyst. For a temporary ovarian cyst pain relief, doctors suggest application of heat and use of vitamin D supplements. To control formation of any new cysts, doctors recommend use of birth control pills. In case the cyst is big enough and is growing further, surgical option is availed. Surgery is also required to treat symptoms of an ovarian cyst rupture. There are a number of techniques available for this kind of surgery. If a woman is in her childbearing years, then the cyst is removed without the removal of ovary. Painful ovarian cyst in pregnant women is closely monitored without any treatment as long as it is not interfering with the pregnancy. If there are any signs of complications, then it is removed by means of surgery without causing any harm to the unborn baby.


ovarian cyst rupture and loss of appetite

Ovarian Cyst Rupture Treatment

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    How dangerous is an infected ruptured ovarian cyst?
    My mom was having pain for a few days so she went to the doctor yesterday and they immediately took her to a hospital in a bigger city where she has to stay for a few days. I can’t go see her until 3 pm today. Apparently she had a few ovarian cysts on one ovary and they all ruptured except for one that is 2 cm big. And now there is an infection. If she doesn’t get better by tomorrow, they will have to do surgery. I am sooooo worried! How dangerous is it?

    • ANSWER:
      it is very dangerous and very painful if left untreated. But your mum is in hospital and with a course of antibiotics to clear up the infection, she will be fine. The cyst that didn’t rupture will be the one they are worried about. If that doesn’t respond to treatment and start reducing in size, then they will need to operate. It isn’t as bad as it sounds. It is a keyhole surgery with a tiny incision and a tiny camera to guide the doctor to remove it.
      Ovarian cysts often occur in other female family members and you would be wise to learn from this. When a cyst ruptures is when this is dangerous. Keep a check on your health and see a doctor sooner rather than later if something doesn’t feel quite right.

  2. QUESTION:
    Can having multiple ruptured ovarian cysts prevent me from having children in the future?
    Im 16 and i have had 3 or 4 ruptured ovarian cysts. I don’t want to go on the pill but if it i continue to have them rupture can it prevent me from having children in the future?

    • ANSWER:
      Hi…
      If you haven’t already you may eventually be diagnosed with pcos (poly cystic ovarian syndrome). Generally 1 out of 15 women will have some form of it. If you have any problems with fertility there are numerous medications and fertility treatments to help you in the future.

      The very best of luck and i hope your ok. x

  3. QUESTION:
    Natural ways of shrinking uterine fibroids and ovarian cysts?
    Today I was diagnosed with three uterine fibroids (3 cm each) and a small ovarian cyst. I don’t want to get surgery as it could be dangerous for other organs. Are there any natural ways of shrinking them?

    Thank you.

    • ANSWER:
      Fibroids are benign uterine growths. Many women have no symptoms while others experience bleeding, increased urination, bladder displacement, urine retention, constipation, infertility, miscarriage, pain during intercourse and anemia. Ovarian cysts are enlarged follicles that fail to rupture and release an egg. Women may experience general pain, disrupted periods, pain in the back and abdomen and painful intercourse. Both of these conditions are caused by imbalances in estrogen production. There are many natural treatments to deal with both of these conditions. Talk to your doctor about any natural supplements you are using.

      Herbal Treatments for Fibroids

      Herbal treatments that address bleeding often work quite quickly, but supplements that control hormone levels take about three months of use before bringing about noticeable results.

      Black cohosh controls bleeding and relieves pain; take 500 milligrams daily. Cinnamon oil has a long history of use in traditional American medicine to control bleeding fibroids. Use 10-to-15 drops every 15 minutes until the bleeding stops. Dan shen, which should only be used under professional supervision, treats congealed blood, dark red clots during menstruation, and relieves pelvic congestion. Reishi tincture alleviates pelvic inflammation. Take one tablespoon in ¼ cup of water three times daily.

      There are three traditional Chinese formulas that are commonly used to treat uterine fibroids. Take as directed on the product label.

      Augmented Rambling powder lowers estrogen levels and is most useful for women who are also suffering from painful or difficult urination. Cinnamon Twig and Poria Pill lowers estrogen levels without interfering with the menstrual cycle or causing weight gain. Four Substance Decoction treats fibroids and is especially useful for women who eat a poor diet.
      Herbal Treatments for Ovarian Cysts

      Dioscorea tincture, also known as wild yam, alleviates cramping caused by ovarian cysts. Take as directed on the label. Dong quai relieves pain resulting from this condition. Take 1,000 milligrams daily during the two-week period after menstruation and then discontinue for two weeks.

      There are several Chinese formulas used to treat ovarian cysts. Use as directed on the product label.

      Dong Quai and Peony Powder reduces estrogen levels and the formation of inflammatory substances in the tissues that line the uterus. Two Cured Decoction reduces estrogen levels. Augmented Rambling Powder and Cinnamon Twig and Poria pill, which are listed above, can also be used for ovarian cysts

      Estrogen is produced from body fat. Excess weight increases the amount of estrogen in the body, so make an effort to maintain a normal weight. Do your best to exercise regularly and reduce stress levels. Avoid the following herbs that stimulate estrogen production: Coleus, Cordyceps, fennel seed, licorice, and moutan.
      What Are Uterine Fibroid Cysts?
      Uterine fibroid cysts are noncancerous tumors that grow in or around the uterus. Uterine fibroids are a common medical complaint, occurring in up to 80 percent of …
      Uterine Cysts
      Uterine cysts are tumors that can vary in size from less than 1 inch to as large as a melon. Also referred to as uterine fibroids, or simply fibroids, these growths …
      Dong Quai Benefits

      Dong quai (Angelica sinensis) is a plant found at high altitudes in the mountain regions of China, Korea and Japan. It has been used for thousands of years to treat a …
      How to Cure Ovarian Cysts & Uterine Fibroids

      Ovarian cysts and uterine fibroids are two problems that commonly affect women. In many cases, they go away on their own, without requiring treatment. However, they …
      Uterine Fibroid Laser Treatment

      Uterine fibroids are quite common, and usually go away on their own. Even when this does not occur, these fibroids are usually benign. However, when they result in …
      How to Treat Uterine Fibroids With Natural Medicine

      Uterine fibroids are hard growths that occur in the muscle tissue of the uterus, particularly in women between the ages of 35 and 45. Often fibroids cause little or …
      Herbs to Take for Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

      Polycystic ovary syndrome is a disorder of the ovaries that causes multiple follicles to develop and form into clumps. Rather than disintegrate during menstruation …
      Ovarian Fibroid Procedures

      According to the University of Pennsylvania, fibroids are a common abnormal growth within the uterus and are the No. 1 reason U.S. women have a hysterectomy. Fibroids …
      Homeopathic Treatment Help for Shrinking a Uterus Fibroid

      In some cases, homeopathic medicine can be extremely helpful in shrinking uterine fibroids. A fibroid is a muscle tumor that can produce heavy menstrual bleeding …

  4. QUESTION:
    How to intentionally pop an ovarian cyst?
    Is there a way to actually pop an ovarian cyst?
    My doctor already surgically removed one that grew to the size of a golf ball (had to take almost the whole ovary with it due to damage) and they found another cyst on the remaining ovary recently.
    They refuse to give me any sort of treatment, even if it grows to a dangerous size, they said they don’t want to do anything about it because they think I gave it to myself. Plus they think I’m too young (almost 22) to have these kinds of issues and that’s another reason why they are refusing any treatment.

    To answer any questions; my body doesn’t react to birth control, which I know sounds odd or even fake, but it doesn’t effect me. I’ve also researched it and I don’t think I want to risk myself for cancer.

    How can I pop it since I don’t seem to have the legal right to get it removed no matter what kinds of problems it can bring me? Would giving myself PID help or a lot of physical exercise do anything to make it rupture? Popping it myself is the only way I can get medical treatment for this thing and it’s already past the size of a grape.
    My doctors encouraged it but didn’t tell me how I could force it.

    • ANSWER:

  5. QUESTION:
    What are some treatments for ruptured ovarian cysts?
    I’m thinking oral contraceptives and hysterectomy. (Have tried oral contraceptives and even the new-generation ones cause my blood pressure to shoot up from a very normal 114/64 to a very dangerous 155/100.) At any rate, are those the only two treatments available?

    • ANSWER:
      Chronic Ovarian Cyst Sufferer Discovers Scientifically Proven Way To Reverse And Eliminate All Ovarian Cysts And PCOS Within 2 Months Naturally, And Finally Reveals The Unbelievably Easy, Step-By-Step Actions You Could Already Be Taking To Say Goodbye to Ovarian Cysts And PCOS Forever.

  6. QUESTION:
    Does Fibrocystic Breat Disease and ovarian cysts have any kind of relation to each other?
    I have had FBD since my early teens, and now I am 18 and I have had two ovarian cysts(that I know of within the last 3 months) rupture. Is there any kind of relation between these two conditions? and could this effect my fertility?

    • ANSWER:
      No not in relations…Bra Cancer is much different and it is a cancer as far as I know cancer is malignant and damage is done on normal cells as Cancer feeds off the body to be a over growth of cells and the cells are accepted by the body not as foe but as friend yet the cancer feeds until is uses up the good of the body and rots…
      So far in my recent diagnosis of fibroids…It is not cancerous and at any time fibrois appear..due to being obese as a feature in Black Women more…durring 40′s and women who have not had children and are close to menopausal stages the fibroids will dry up…The body is making one last big bang…stage is set to give yourself a chance or one last call before closing time the fibroids can be treated with drugs or removed by lazer and healing time is 2 to 3 days on a treatment…Total removal of the lining by historectomy will remove the area only responsible for the growth and rinder you unable to have children…even the treatment says no children stage…It can be avoided the idea is to prolong your female hormones nature given and not rush into menopause
      A Pause for the Men…I understand that The Big S is still on and Poppin…Either Way…You are quite young for this so look to speed up having your children …Tell the doctor children are a option in your future…You can still have a baby soon…Cover the basis legal…Marrage if the Guy agrees is a better option than child support or welfare or with your parents help….for you it is possible..option.
      Take care to be here for a long time unless you bleed heavy and unless you are in pain You can live with fibroids for a long time and not have a problem and they grow slow so you have plenty of time to see how you are going to proceed
      Not many doctors will tell you anything you have to be a big vigulanty on the web and look up sources.
      Web MD and Fibroids section of Yahoo was a big brace for me.
      Details even the National NDCC will send you a book for free
      booklet…
      I would read about MS and Fibroids and as I turn 40..I go for a checkup and the doctor finds things and I thought I was the picture of health to me … Overly healthy in a way the fibroids do not hurt me until they started ultrasounding and picking with them in test…I am looking at option of hystorectomy..I want this as a last resort…Kind of thanking God I have options
      Lazar…Emoblization…Therapy Support Groups…I am not going to give up and give in without a fight…While I still have God and a great fight in me to try to live…
      I heard on the radio One woman said it is common and she can feel hers being fed if she drinked sweet tea or fried chicken…I too feel to cut of the source of it being fed and it will need to die or fall out or burn out or cut out …Idea it is genetics and it will come back and case out other areas…
      I have a big choice to make even with the doctors I feel I got to answer to God for myself…I lay on MRI tables thinking of the people before me and after me….The times in church when they said to prepare for times like these in your health with your faith …I am not going to give up on God and I wonder about what must I face to be saved…What must I give up to be saved…A man on the Radio said You do not know what you must give up to be saved in this race for life.. Or how what you are going to face will be a great help to others going through on the journey…So I made a decision to follow Christ example…and I figure he gave up his life ….for us and many of us can not face what he faced for us. He ask for so little to live right and some of us can not even face living right and following the so called rules and staying off Jerry and Maurry…It seems like nothing happens to them…They just mess up a poor innocent baby…and have to work harder to make a great life come for the child…

  7. QUESTION:
    Do Fibrocystic Breast Disease and ovarian cysts have any kind of relation to each other?
    I have had FBD since my early teens, and now I am 18 and I have had two ovarian cysts(that I know of within the last 3 months) rupture. Is there any kind of relation between these two conditions? and could this effect my fertility?

    • ANSWER:
      I have fibrocystic breast disease and have had it since my early teens. I also have polycystic ovarian syndrome. My mother also has FBD and had a hysterectomy due to cysts so it also runs in families. The cycts on your ovaries could just be random cysts or it could be PCOS (polycystic ovarian syndrome) and many women who have PCOS suffer from fertility issues but there are treatments to help with these issues but you first need to see a specialist and be properly diagnosed and do it soon before damage is done.

  8. QUESTION:
    Do ovarian cysts usually need to be surgically removed?
    I was told today after getting MRI results that I need to see an oncologist. I always thought that most ovarian cysts and fibroids are not cancer. I have no symptoms, no pain, no bleeding.
    Do you think I’ll have to have that godd-awful test called a ‘Hysterosonography?’
    the report mentioned that I should go for a transvaginal sonogram for more information.

    • ANSWER:
      Typically, ovarian cysts are functional (not disease or cancer related) and occur as a normal process of ovulation. During the days before ovulation, a follicle grows. But at the time of expected ovulation, the follicle fails to break open and release an egg, as it is supposed to. Instead, the fluid within the follicle remains and forms a cyst.

      Functional, or physiological, ovarian cysts usually disappear within 8-12 weeks without treatment. They are relatively common, and are more common during a woman’s childbearing years (puberty to menopause). Ovarian cysts are rare after menopause.

      Functional ovarian cysts are not the same as ovarian tumors (including ovarian cancer) or cysts due to hormone-related conditions such as polycystic ovarian disease. Some non-functional ovarian cysts must be treated to go away.

      An ovarian cyst can cause pain if it pushes on nearby structures, ruptures or bleeds. Pain may also occur if the cyst is twisted or causes twisting (torsion) of the fallopian tube.

      Symptoms of ovarian cysts can include:

      * Pelvic pain – constant, dull aching
      * Pain with intercourse or pelvic pain during movement
      * Pain during bowel movements
      * Pelvic pain shortly after beginning or ending a menstrual period
      * Abnormal uterine bleeding (change from normal menstrual pattern)
      * Longer than usual menstrual cycle
      * Shorter than usual menstrual cycle
      * Absent menstruation
      * Irregular menstruation
      * Abdominal bloating or swelling

      Often no symptoms are noted and ovarian cysts are found only be routine examinations. Usually birth control pills may be prescribed to help establish normal cycles and decrease the development of functional ovarian cysts.

      Simple ovarian cysts that are larger than 5-10 centimetres and complex ovarian cysts that persist should and will usually be surgically removed via laparoscopy (minimal invasive surgery).

      I would recommend that you discuss all the details such as the type of cyst, size of cyst etc with your doctor/gyno and ask them to answer any questions or concerns you may have.

      I have suffered from many bilateral ovarian cysts over the past 10 years and have had to have surgery 2 times to the cysts removed (it wasn’t anything too serious).

      I hope this helps to answer your question. Good luck :)

  9. QUESTION:
    How much do CT scans of the lower abdomen and pelvis cost?
    I’m getting a CT scan on thursday of the lower abdomen and pelvis because of the possibility of an ovarian cyst. My mom says they can be more than 00, but I just wanted to know if it was cheaper if it’s only for a small part of the body. Our insurance probably won’t cover much of it and we do not have a lot of money right now, so I am a little worried about the cost.

    • ANSWER:
      about 1200 up to 7000 dollars if done with contrast dye and depends which facility that you use. Health One system will clean out your insurance and you will still have to pay a portion of the bill, what ever insurance doesn’t cover…
      Why do you need an abdominal CT scan. Ovarian cyst can be checked with vag ultrasound. They usually rupture on their own, but, if they are extremely large that’s different..
      Call your insurance company and ask them or review your book on insurance xrays and CT and MRI scans… Ask your doc if there is another way to diagnose this. Do you have alot of pain and unusual bleeding. check internet on ovarian cysts. that’s all you need in your address bar. and see what the treatment is.

  10. QUESTION:
    Anyone ever had an ovarian cyst?
    I’ve been in horrible pain the past week and finally went to the ER, they did a CT scan and told me that my right ovary is inflammed, that it is an ovarian cyst. My WBC was high which presents infection. Could this be cancer?

    • ANSWER:
      No, its nothing to worry about unless they rupture..i have a cyst in my righy ovary no big deal…now tell me if it was cancer dont you think they would had send you to a cancer center for earlier treatment…for the guy who said yes that its cancer, he just wanted those 2 points.

  11. QUESTION:
    How to treat an ovarian cyst?
    I just found out I have a little ovarian cyst. I’ve already been in pain for two weeks. I can’t take anymore. What’s gonna happen?? Supposebly they go away on their own, how long till it goes awayy? Help

    • ANSWER:
      Hi,
      You can’t depend on symptoms alone to tell you if you have an ovarian cyst. In fact, you’ll likely have no symptoms at all. Or if you do, the symptoms may be similar to those of other conditions, such as endometriosis, pelvic inflammatory disease, ectopic pregnancy or ovarian cancer. Even appendicitis and diverticulitis can produce signs and symptoms that mimic a ruptured ovarian cyst.

      Still, it’s important to be watchful of any symptoms or changes in your body and to know which symptoms are serious. If you have an ovarian cyst, you may experience one or more of the following signs and symptoms:

      ■Menstrual irregularities
      ■Pelvic pain — a constant or intermittent dull ache that may radiate to your lower back and thighs
      ■Pelvic pain shortly before your period begins or just before it ends
      ■Pelvic pain during intercourse (dyspareunia)
      ■Pain during bowel movements or pressure on your bowels
      ■Nausea, vomiting or breast tenderness similar to that experienced during pregnancy
      ■Fullness or heaviness in your abdomen
      ■Pressure on your rectum or bladder — difficulty emptying your bladder completely
      When to see a doctor
      Seek immediate medical attention if you have:

      ■Sudden, severe abdominal or pelvic pain
      ■Pain accompanied by fever or vomiting
      These signs and symptoms — or those of shock, such as cold, clammy skin, rapid breathing, and lightheadedness or weakness — indicate an emergency and mean that you need to see a doctor right away.
      Treatment depends on your age, the type and size of your cyst, and your symptoms. Your doctor may suggest:

      ■Watchful waiting. You can wait and be re-examined in one to three months if you’re in your reproductive years, you have no symptoms and an ultrasound shows you have a simple, fluid-filled cyst. Your doctor will likely recommend that you get follow-up pelvic ultrasounds at periodic intervals to see if your cyst has changed in size.

      Watchful waiting, including regular monitoring with ultrasound, is also a common treatment option recommended for postmenopausal women if a cyst is filled with fluid and is less than 2 centimeters in diameter.

      ■Birth control pills. Your doctor may recommend birth control pills to reduce the chance of new cysts developing in future menstrual cycles. Oral contraceptives offer the added benefit of significantly reducing your risk of ovarian cancer — the risk decreases the longer you take birth control pills.
      ■Surgery. Your doctor may suggest removal of a cyst if it is large, doesn’t look like a functional cyst, is growing or persists through two or three menstrual cycles. Cysts that cause pain or other symptoms may be removed.

      Some cysts can be removed without removing the ovary in a procedure known as a cystectomy. Your doctor may also suggest removing the affected ovary and leaving the other intact in a procedure known as oophorectomy. Both procedures may allow you to maintain your fertility if you’re still in your childbearing years. Leaving at least one ovary intact also has the benefit of maintaining a source of estrogen production.

      If a cystic mass is cancerous, however, your doctor will advise a hysterectomy to remove both ovaries and your uterus. After menopause, the risk of a newly found cystic ovarian mass being cancerous increases. As a result, doctors more commonly recommend surgery when a cystic mass develops on the ovaries after menopause.

  12. QUESTION:
    Does a ruptured ovarian cyst cause high glucose levels?
    Hey guys,
    I’ve been a type 1 diabetic for nearly 11 years. I’ve recently been in hospital, the doctors found a ruptured and bleeding cyst in my body. They then sent me home with painkillers and said the problem would come right.

    My glucose levels in my blood have been abnormally high though, do you think it could be from the ruptured cyst?

    I really need to know, because Im giving myself much more insulin for food than I used to?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes. Obesity and infrequent or lack of ovulation are common findings in women with polycystic ovarian syndrome. The cause of PCOS isn’t completely known, however there are some issues that have been implicated:

      Insulin resistance. If a person’s body is less sensitive to insulin or is unable to use it to effectively import glucose (sugars from food) into the cells of the body, the person has to make more insulin than usual to get the same amount of glucose into the cell. Increased insulin stimulates the ovaries to produce more androgens (male hormones).
      Increased inflammation may cause insulin resistance. Certain foods are thought to increase inflammation.
      hereditary factors
      Having polycystic ovarian syndrome increases the risk of type 2 diabetes, heart disease, stroke, infertility, high cholesterol, sleep apnea, abnormal uterine bleeding, endometrial cancer, gestational diabetes, high blood pressure during pregnancy, ruptured ovarian cysts with related bleeding, and possibly even nonalcoholic hepatitis.

      Check with your doctor for possible polycystic ovarian syndrome. You should consult with an endocrinologist, if you haven’t already, in order to get a more specialized feedback on your diabetic treatment.

      Hope this helps.

  13. QUESTION:
    Can exercise rupture an ovarian cyst?
    I got an ultrasound done today and the lab tech saw a cyst on my left ovary that appears to be twice the size of my uterus. Would it be dangerous to exercise? I need to start loosing weight and I plan on using the new Wii Fit that uses hula hooping and abdominal twists.

    • ANSWER:
      OVARIAN CYSTS

      About Your Diagnosis

      Ovarian cysts are fluid filled structures that develop in the ovary. Ovarian cysts develop with every menstrual cycle. Fluid collects around developing eggs; one egg becomes “dominant” and that egg ovulates (leaves the ovary and goes into the fallopian tube). The ovulated egg leaves a cyst behind in the ovary. This cyst is usually 2—3 centimeters (1—2 inches) in diameter. This type of cyst is called a “physiologic cyst,” “follicular cyst,” or “simple cyst.” If the cyst remains a normal size, it does not cause any symptoms. If the cyst grows larger, 4 centimeters or larger, it can cause pain. Symptomatic cysts are very common; in most cases, the cyst and symptoms will resolve without any treatment.

      Occasionally, cysts can bleed into themselves. A very small blood vessel in the wall of the cyst breaks, and the blood goes into the cyst. These are called “hemorrhagic cysts” and sometimes are more painful. Hemorrhagic cysts are common as well. Occasionally, hemorrhagic cysts can rupture, and the blood goes into the abdominal cavity. No blood is seen out of the vagina. If a cyst ruptures, it is usually very painful. Hemorrhagic cysts that rupture are less common. Most hemorrhagic cysts are self-limiting; some need surgical intervention (see below). Even if the hemorrhagic cyst ruptures, in many cases it will resolve without surgery. Sometimes surgery is necessary.
      READ MORE..

      http://apma-nc.com/PatientEducation/ovarian_cysts.htm

  14. QUESTION:
    what is the treatment of ruptured graafian follicle before the time of menstruation?
    my wife has suffered from ruptured ovarian cyst and a surgical exploration had been done the last month and this month also issuffering from an ovarian cyst that does not rupture and she is on the time of ovulation

    • ANSWER:
      There is no real treatment for a ruptured ovarian cyst. The doctors will usually do blood work to make sure there is no internal bleeding or infection. They may also give pain meds. If there are signs of bleeding than surgery may be required. I have had a ton of ovarian cysts rupture but I have not had to have surgery. Thank goodness. Good luck to you both

  15. QUESTION:
    I have a large ovarian cyst on my right side I NEED SOME ADVISE?
    Basically I only found out about this mid October of 08. They discovered it by a simple ultra sound. It’s quite large. I’ve been booked in for surgery on the 14 Jan but am worried that I haven’t been given any other treatment options before surgery. Has anyone out there decided not to have surgery, but choose another treatment option to see if it will shrink?

    • ANSWER:
      I don’t know of any other options besides surgery. If the cyst ruptures it is VERY painful. You don’t want that to happen.

  16. QUESTION:
    What does a gynecologist do about an ovarian cyst?
    I have to go to to the gynecologist tomorrow and I’m really really scared. What are they going to do to me?

    • ANSWER:
      Ovarian cysts are small fluid-filled sacs that develop in a woman’s ovaries. Most cysts are harmless, but some may cause problems such as rupturing, bleeding, or pain; and surgery may be required to remove the cyst(s).

      Functional ovarian cysts are the most common type of ovarian cyst. They usually disappear by themselves and seldom require treatment. Growths that become abnormally large or last longer than a few months should be removed or examined to determine if they are a sign of a more serious condition.

      Before an OB can perform any procedure, they will to determine first what type of cyst is present. Some might need just medical treatment and medications, while some would require surgeries.

      In any case, you should not be scared. Bear in mind that by immediately seeking for medical help would reduce anymore possible risk, and that it could be easily prevented as early as possible.

      Hope everything turns out okay. :)

  17. QUESTION:
    What is cyst? How can i protect the other ovary from this cyst?
    As i was refering for my problem in my ovary i found that it is cyst so i need to know what this cyst is and how to prevent it?

    • ANSWER:
      A cyst is a fluid-filled sac that is either in or on an ovary (the female organ where eggs are stored). There are different types of cysts that occur for different reasons. Most cysts are small and do not cause a problem. They may even go away on their own without you ever noticing that you had them.

      Most ovarian cysts are not cancerous. If you have a cyst, it is important to find out whether yours is cancerous or not. Some cysts may grow large enough to become twisted, which causes pain.

      Some cysts may bleed or rupture (break open), which are problems that needs to be treated immediately. If you have been told that you have an ovarian cyst, follow your doctor’s recommendations for treatment and follow-up.

      Your BeingGirl Experts

  18. QUESTION:
    What information about OVARIAN CYSTS have any of you found useful?
    Do any of you people have preety much constant annoyance from one or the other?? do you have to modify sexual positions? I do. I was wondering if anyone else does, and what they did about it, and if the doctors can do anything about it? Mine hurts when there is a lack of pressure on it, or during sex, it hurts when penetrations are too hard/wrong position. Thank you for your time!
    I was really wanting to know about other people’s experiences with them, and what they did! thanks

    • ANSWER:
      I have had heaps of cysts on my ovaries (mostly on the left side) but have had a couple on the right side too. My doctor sends me for an ultrasound usually every 3 months to check because I get them so often.

      Most of the time my doctor has just made me wait a few cycles to see whether the cysts go away on their own and they usually did, however I had a really big simple cyst (fluid only) on my left ovary in 2005 that was 7.7cm. It ruptured and spilled it’s fluid all over my insides and I had to have an emergency laparoscopy to clean it all out. Most recently in April this year I had a complex cyst (hemorrhagic – meaning a blood cyst that bleeds into itself) that was 4.6cm and it was causing me a lot of pain. This one also ruptured and although I had pretty bad pain, I was lucky not to have to have emergency surgery again.

      Usually what doctors do when you have a cyst, they will decide either to wait and see whether the cyst resolves on it’s own over a few cycles and if it continues to grow to a certain size then they may decide to remove the cyst by doing a laparoscopy. They will usually remove the cyst if it’s causing you a lot of pain too, no matter the size. The may also prescribe the birth control pill, which is what my doctor did for me this year.

      My doctor has put me on a low dose birth control pill as he thinks the pill prevents cysts from forming as women don’t ovulate while on the pill and because most cysts form due to ovulation and releasing of the egg. I must add though that my doctor has said that you can still get cysts even if you are on the pill. So far so good as I haven’t yet had another cyst (that I know of anyways) but I’m having other problems that are giving me similar symptoms like those I felt every single time I’ve had a cyst. I have pain with intercourse, really intense and painful periods, acute pelvic pain and I’m waiting to find out when I will have my laparoscopy to find out whether or not I might have endometriosis.

      If you think you have a cyst, please go see your doctor and discuss treatment options with them. Don’t delay getting something done about it or at least discussing it with a health professional. Everyone is different and there could be other problems that one can have too, like endometriosis causing cysts on your ovaries too.

      I hope this helped you out a bit. If you have any further questions, please feel free to email me anytime. The link to my email should be in my profile.

      Good luck :)

  19. QUESTION:
    How large does an ovarian cyst have to get before it becomes bothersome?
    By bothersome, I mean causing lower abdominal discomfort and pressure.

    • ANSWER:
      Many women have ovarian cysts at some time during their lives. Most ovarian cysts present little or no discomfort and are harmless. The majority of ovarian cysts disappear without treatment within a few months.
      However, ovarian cysts — especially those that have ruptured — sometimes produce serious symptoms. The best way to protect your health is to know the symptoms and types of ovarian cysts that may signal a more significant problem, and to schedule regular pelvic examinations.
      You can’t depend on symptoms alone to tell you if you have an ovarian cyst. In fact, you’ll likely have no symptoms at all. Or if you do, the symptoms may be similar to those of other conditions, such as endometriosis, pelvic inflammatory disease, ectopic pregnancy or ovarian cancer. Even appendicitis and diverticulitis can produce signs and symptoms that mimic a ruptured ovarian cyst.

      Still, it’s important to be watchful of any symptoms or changes in your body and to know which symptoms are serious. If you have an ovarian cyst, you may experience one or more of the following signs and symptoms:

      * Menstrual irregularities
      * Pelvic pain — a constant or intermittent dull ache that may radiate to your lower back and thighs
      * Pelvic pain shortly before your period begins or just before it ends
      * Pelvic pain during intercourse (dyspareunia)
      * Pain during bowel movements or pressure on your bowels
      * Nausea, vomiting or breast tenderness similar to that experienced during pregnancy
      * Fullness or heaviness in your abdomen
      * Pressure on your rectum or bladder — difficulty emptying your bladder completely

      When to see a doctor
      Seek immediate medical attention if you have:

      * Sudden, severe abdominal or pelvic pain
      * Pain accompanied by fever or vomiting

      These signs and symptoms — or those of shock, such as cold, clammy skin, rapid breathing, and lightheadedness or weakness — indicate an emergency and mean that you need to see a doctor right away.

  20. QUESTION:
    How do I know if I have an Ovarian Cyst or if i’m Pregnant?
    Is there anyway to know if I have an Ovarian Cyst or if i’m Pregnant without going to a doctor?

    Can I have any ides? I’ve just found out that they have the same symptoms….
    ideas* sorry type
    I also did some research, and I may even have an Ectopic Pregnancy?

    • ANSWER:
      Typically, ovarian cysts are functional (not disease or cancer related) and occur as a normal process of ovulation. During the days before ovulation, a follicle grows. But at the time of expected ovulation, the follicle fails to break open and release an egg, as it is supposed to. Instead, the fluid within the follicle remains and forms a cyst.

      Functional, or physiological, ovarian cysts usually disappear within 8-12 weeks without treatment. They are relatively common, and are more common during a woman’s childbearing years (puberty to menopause). Ovarian cysts are rare after menopause.

      Functional ovarian cysts are not the same as ovarian tumors (including ovarian cancer) or cysts due to hormone-related conditions such as polycystic ovarian disease. Some non-functional ovarian cysts must be treated to go away.

      An ovarian cyst can cause pain if it pushes on nearby structures, ruptures or bleeds. Pain may also occur if the cyst is twisted or causes twisting (torsion) of the fallopian tube.

      Symptoms of ovarian cysts can include:

      * Pelvic pain – constant, dull aching
      * Pain with intercourse or pelvic pain during movement
      * Pain during bowel movements
      * Pelvic pain shortly after beginning or ending a menstrual period
      * Abnormal uterine bleeding (change from normal menstrual pattern)
      * Longer than usual menstrual cycle
      * Shorter than usual menstrual cycle
      * Absent menstruation
      * Irregular menstruation
      * Abdominal bloating or swelling

      Often no symptoms are noted and ovarian cysts are found only be routine examinations. Usually birth control pills may be prescribed to help establish normal cycles and decrease the development of functional ovarian cysts.

      Simple ovarian cysts that are larger than 5-10 centimetres and complex ovarian cysts that persist should and will usually be surgically removed via laparoscopy (minimal invasive surgery).

      I would recommend that if you think you have an ovarian cyst that you consult with your doctor/gyno about this and ask them to answer any questions or concerns you may have.

      I have suffered from many bilateral ovarian cysts over the past 11 years and have surgery 2 times to have them removed (it wasn’t anything too serious).

      I hope this helps to answer your question. Good luck :)

  21. QUESTION:
    My girfriend just told me she has an Ovarian Cyst. Should i be worried?
    Well my girlfriend just told me she got diagnosed with an Ovarian Cyst. My question is should i be worried?

    • ANSWER:
      A cyst is a fluid-filled sac that is either in or on an ovary (the female organ where eggs are stored). There are different types of cysts that occur for different reasons. Most cysts are small and do not cause a problem. They may even go away on their own without you ever noticing that you had them.

      Most ovarian cysts are not cancerous. If you have a cyst, it is important to find out whether yours is cancerous or not.

      Some cysts may grow large enough to become twisted, which causes pain. Some cysts may bleed or rupture (break open), which are problems that needs to be treated immediately. If you have been told that you have an ovarian cyst, follow your doctor’s recommendations for treatment and follow-up.

      Your Beinggirl Expert Panel

  22. QUESTION:
    Will this pain go from my stomach from an ovarian cyst?
    I have recently been admitted to hospital and found i had a cyst on my overy which had ruptured. They told me that there was bleeding in my overy and stomach. They sent me out of hospital without treatment but i still feel in extreme pain. Will this pain stop or do i need treatment?

    • ANSWER:
      they should have done something to stop the bleeding. you need to go back there or find another place and have them stop the bleeding(you could bleed to death on the inside). this is something that cant wait.

  23. QUESTION:
    What’s the difference between Mittelschmerz and an Ovarian Cyst?

    • ANSWER:
      Ovarian cysts are small fluid-filled sacs that develop in a woman’s ovaries. Most cysts are harmless, but some may cause problems such as rupturing, bleeding, or pain; and surgery may be required to remove the cyst(s). Ovarian cysts can be categorized as noncancerous or cancerous growths. While cysts may be found in ovarian cancer, ovarian cysts typically represent a harmless (benign) condition.

      Mittelschmerz is one-sided, lower abdominal pain that occurs in women at or around the time of an egg is released from the ovaries (ovulation). It is not caused by cysts, and no treatment is usually necessary. About 20% of women experience mittelschmerz, or pain associated with ovulation. (I’m one of them, lucky me… haha.) The pain may occur just before, during, or after ovulation. There are several explanations for the cause of this pain. Just prior to ovulation, follicle growth may stretch the surface of the ovary, causing pain. At the time of ovulation, fluid or blood is released from the ruptured egg follicle and may cause irritation of the abdominal lining. Mittelschmerz may be felt on one side one month, then switch to the opposite side the next month, or it may be felt on the same side for several months in succession.

      I hope that helped clear things up for you.

      If you think you might have one of these conditions, but you’re still not sure which one you have, see your gynecologist so you can get checked out. If it turns out that you do have a cyst, it’s best to get it looked at as soon as possible in order to determine whether or not you’ll have to get it removed.

      Hope that helped! :)

  24. QUESTION:
    How would a doctor get rid of my cysts?
    I have an apt. tomorow, Ultrasound today, I think I have some cysts (side pains, light period) I had them when I was younger but they always seemed to fix themselves, so I’m not sure what the doctor will do….Anybody have any experience?

    • ANSWER:
      Typically, ovarian cysts are functional (not disease related) and disappear on their own. During the days preceding ovulation, a follicle grows. At the time of expected ovulation, the follicle fails to rupture and release an egg. Instead of being reabsorbed, the fluid within the follicle persists and forms a cyst. Functional cysts usually disappear within 60 days without treatment and are relatively common. They occur most often during childbearing years (puberty to menopause), but may occur at any time. You can read more about ovarian cysts here

      http://www.4woman.gov/faq/ovarian_cysts.htm

      If it is a functional cyst, these usually disappear within 60 days without treatment and are relatively common.

  25. QUESTION:
    What is an ovarian cyst and what treatments are available?

    • ANSWER:

      http://www.medicinenet.com/ovarian_cysts/article.htm

      What are ovarian cysts?

      Ovarian cysts are fluid-filled, sac-like structures within an ovary. The term cyst refers to a fluid-filled structure. Therefore, all ovarian cysts contain at least some fluid.

      What symptoms are caused by ovarian cysts?

      Most cysts are never noticed and resolve without women ever realizing that they are there. When a cyst causes symptoms, pain in the belly or pelvis is by far the most common one. The pain can be caused from rupture of the cyst, rapid growth and stretching, bleeding into the cyst, or twisting of the cyst around its blood supply.

      Your Doctor would have to determine what treatment you would need, most Ovarian cysts will re-absorb into the body although it is possible they can become painful or harmful depending on your situation. The link above should give you the information you need. Good luck!


ovarian cyst rupture treatment